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Full text of "Publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/publicationsofcov15colo 



PUBLICATIONS 



OF 



Clje Colonial ^>orietv of Slpasigad&ugettis 



COLLECTIONS 



Committee of publication 



FRED NORMS ROBINSON 
ALBERT MATTHEWS 
GEORGE LYMAN KITTREDGE 
CHESTER NOYES GREENOUGH 
ALFRED JOHNSON 



Coitor of publications; 

ALBERT MATTHEWS 



PUBLICATIONS 



OF 



Cije Colonial Society of spassaclmsetts 



Volume XV 



COLLECTIONS 



Printed in JHemorp of Jrefcertcfc ietois ££ap 






6c , 

J73-S.0'' 




H&vvJi Co//' 



f e fee orJs 



I 



BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 

I9 2 5 



John Wilson and Son, Cambridge, U.S.A. 



1160350. 

HARVARD COLLEGE RECORDS 
Part I 

CORPORATION RECORDS 

1636- i 750 
I 



PREFACE 



VOLUMES XV and XVI, now completed, contain those 
portions of the early records of Harvard College 
known as College Books I, III, and IV. College Book II 
was destroyed when the second Harvard College was 
burned in January, 1764. Though, strictly speaking, 
there could have been no records of the Corporation 
before 1650 and no records of the Overseers before 1637, 
and though as a matter of fact there is no record of a 
Corporation meeting until December 10, 1654, or of an 
Overseers' meeting until December 27, 1643, and though 
the three College Books in question contain some Over- 
seers' meetings and many records of a miscellaneous 
character, yet the Corporation meetings predominate 
and College Book IV is almost wholly devoted to them: 
hence " Corporation Records, 1636-1750/' has been 
selected as a sub-title. 

In its early records, Harvard College possesses a 
unique mass of material which is of value alike to the 
historian, the genealogist, the economist, and the student 
of education, manners, and customs. As long as this 
material remained in manuscript, so long was it inac- 
cessible to searchers; for many of the books have no 
indexes, and the few that have are inadequately indexed. 
Moreover, some books of great value have already been 
lost, either through fire or vandalism or carelessness, 
while others are rapidly going to destruction through 
handling or the ravages of time. Hence it has long been 



Vlll PREFACE 

felt that at least the most important of the early records 
should be printed in full. The present volumes mark 
the beginning of this undertaking, and that the task was 
possible is due to the generosity of a late member to 
whom the Society has always been under deep obliga- 
tions and to whom, moreover, by reason of the rare 
books and pamphlets he had collected and the tran- 
scripts of important historical manuscripts he had 
caused to be made, all students of New England are 
indebted. In 1902 Mr. Frederick Lewis Gay offered 
to pay for the copying of College Books I, III, and IV, 
and to contribute $2000 towards the cost of printing. 
At that time it was supposed that the three Books 
would fill only a single volume. Later it was found 
that two volumes would be required, and Mrs. Gay, 
who had already shown her interest in the Society by 
the gift of valuable manuscripts and rare pamphlets, 
placed it further under heavy obligation by contribut- 
ing $2000 towards the additional cost of printing. Hence 
these volumes are issued as a memorial to Mr. Gay. 

The Committee expresses the Society's gratitude to 
the Corporation of Harvard College for permission to 
print these records. For help of various kinds, the 
Editor is greatly indebted to his colleagues on the Com- 
mittee of Publication, especially Mr. George Lyman 
Kittredge, to the late Mr. Gay, and to Mr. William 
Coolidge Lane, Librarian of the Harvard College Library. 

For the Committee of Publication, 

Fred Norris Robinson, 

Chairman. 

Boston, December 1, 1924. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Preface vii 

List of Illustrations xi 

Introduction: 

Preliminary xiii 

College Book I xiv 

College Book II xvii 

College Book III xxiii 

College Book IV xxiv 

College Book V in Folio (Treasurer Brattle's Book) .... xxvii 
College Book V in Quarto (President Leverett's Diary) . . . xxix 

College Book VI in Folio (Hollis Book) xxx 

President Wadsworth's Diary xxxi 

Hopkins Book xxxi 

Overseers xxxii 

Corporation and College Charters xxxvi 

College Buildings, 1637-1750: 

First Harvard College (1642-1679) Ixvii 

Goffe's College (1651-1660) lxxvii 

Indian College (1655-1698) Ixxxii 

Second Harvard College (1677-1764) Ixxxv 

Third Harvard College or Hall (built 1764-1766) . . . xciv 

Stoughton College (1699-1781) xciv 

Massachusetts Hall (1720) ci 

President's Houses: 

First: Peyntree House (1637-1641) civ 

Second: Dunster's House (1645-1680) civ 

Third (1680-1719) cvi 

Fourth: Wadsworth House (1726) cxv 

Holden Chapel (1744) cxxi 

The Words "College" and "Hall" cxxviii 

The Word "Fellow" cxxxii 

Identifications cxxxv 



X TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Attendance at Corporation Meetings, 1674-1707 cxlv 

Chronological List of College Officers, 1637-1750: 

Presidents clii 

Acting Presidents cliii 

Fellows cliv 

Treasurers clvi 

Professors: 

Theology clvii 

Mathematics clvii 

Tutors clviii 

Instructors clix 

Librarians clx 

Stewards clxi 

Chronological List of Massachusetts Officials, 1636-1774: 

Governors clxiv 

Deputy- or Lieutenant-Governors clxv 

Secretaries clxvi 

Treasurers clxvi 

List of Commencement Days, 1042-1750 clxvii 

Chronological List of Meetings, 1643-1750 clxix 

Officers of this Society, December 1, 1924 clxxvii 

Resident Members clxxviii 

Honorary Members clxxx 

Corresponding Members clxxx 

Harvard College Records, 1636-1750: 

College Book I 1 

College Book III 169 

College Book IV 333 



Glossary 865 

Index 871 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



PAGE 

A Prospect of the Colledges in Cambridge in New Eng- 
land, 1726 Frontispiece 

From an original owned by the Massachusetts Historical Society 

Plan of the College Yard Ixviii 

Governors' Meeting of December 27, 1643, and Drawing of 

Seal of Harvard College 16 

From College Book I. 27. In an unknown hand 

Seal of Harvard College 176 

From College Book III. 6 

Plan A. Salt Marsh lying in Dorchester 190 

From College Book III. 102. In the hand of President Edward Holyoke. 
See page 279 

Plan B. College Farm at Lunenburg 200 

From College Book III. 112. In the hand of President Benjamin 
Wadsworth. See page 290 

Plan C. College Farm at Townsend 210 

From College Book III. 113. In the hand of President Benjamin 
Wadsworth. See page 291 

Plan D. Rutland 220 

From College Book III. 120-121. In the hand of President Edward 
Holyoke. See page 297 

Plan E. College Farm in the West Wing of the Town of 

Rutland 230 

From College Book III. 122. In the hand of President Edward Holyoke. 
See page 209 

Plan F. Tract of Land lying in Billerica at a Place called 

Shawshin 240 

From College Book III. 123. In the hand of President Edward Holyoke. 
See page 299 



Xll LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

Plan G. Rogers's Farm in Waltham 250 

From College Book III. 125. In the hand of President Edward Holyoke. 
See page 301 

Plan H. Plan of the Sink from the Kitchen of Harvard 
Hall and of the Drains from Stoughton and Massa- 
chusetts 260 

From College Book III. 12G. In the hand of President Edward Holyoke. 
See page 302 

Plan I. College Land in the President's Improvement . 270 

From College Book III. 127. In the hand of President Samuel Langdon. 
See page 302 

Plan J. College Lot on the West of Cambridge Common. 280 

From College Book III. 128. In the hand of President Samuel Langdon. 
See page 304 

Plan K. Brownfield 290 

From College Book III. 129. In the hand of President Samuel Langdon. 
See page 304 

Plan L. Township of Fryeburg 300 

From College Book III. 131. In the hand of President Samuel Langdon. 
See page 305 

Seal of Marischal College, Aberdeen, Scotland 322 

From College Book III. 150. In the hand of President Edward Holyoke 



INTRODUCTION 



THE general character of the contents of College Books I and 
III has long been known, since portions were printed in 1833 
in Benjamin Peirce's History of Harvard University and in 1840 
by President Josiah Quincy in his History of Harvard University, 
and the exact contents were indicated page by page in 1895 by the 
late Andrew McFarland Davis. 1 But Quincy's transcripts, besides 
being incomplete, are sometimes inaccurate; 2 Mr. Davis's Analysis, 
though useful, is merely a calendar, is extremely brief, and makes 
reference to the original Books necessary; and large portions of 
those Books are here printed for the first time. Quincy printed 
little from College Book IV, and Mr. Davis's Analysis merely indi- 
cates its contents in a general way: hence the contents of that Book 
are now made known practically for the first time. 

The material here printed covers a period of one hundred and 
fourteen years, 3 and, as one would naturally expect, contains many 
references to various College records. Presidents Leverett, Wads- 
worth, Holyoke, and Quincy were diligent students of these records, 
and inserted many marginal entries which were not only useful in 
their day as indicating the nature of the matter recorded, but which 
also throw important light on the College records themselves. Pre- 
vious to the time of President Wadsworth (1725-1737), the early 
volumes of records were known only by title, and were always so 
cited by President Leverett (1708-1724) in the numerous marginal 



1 An Analysis of the Early Records of Harvard College, 1636-1750 (Library 
of Harvard University, Bibliographical Contributions, No. 50, 1895). In 1888 
Mr. Davis compiled A Few Notes on the Records of Harvard College (id., No. 27). 

2 An instance, where "synopsis of arts" was deprived of meaning by being 
printed "synopsis of acts," is given in our Publications, xviii. 318 note. Cf. 
pp. lix note 2, Ixxi note 3, below. 

3 That is, the main material, which ends with 1750: but occasional entries of 
a later period are found. 



XIV INTRODUCTION 

entries made by him. Six of these volumes were not only numbered 
by Wadsworth 1 to G, 1 but he also compiled an Index to their con- 
tents which is still extant. A detailed description of these Books 
follows. 

College Book I 

This Book contains 354 pages, of which 217 are blank. 2 The 
leaves measure 6% inches in width by 16J/2 m height. It contains 
Corporation meetings, Overseers' meetings, a list of graduates from 
1C42 to 1795, 3 the College Laws of 1734, the Library Laws of 1736, 
and some miscellaneous records, extending from 1643 to 1687. 

Previous to 1725, this Book was known as "Long College Book" 
and "Old College Book." As already stated, President Wadsworth, 
no doubt finding such designations cumbersome, numbered certain 
volumes 1 to 6. On the first page of the Book in question is written 
in his hand: 

College Book N°. 1. 

When bound, presumably in President Quincy's day (1829-1845), 4 
the back of the cover was labelled "College Book No. 1. & 2." For 
an explanation of this mistake, see p. xix, below. 

The pagination of this book is both puzzling and confusing, many 
pages having two, and some three, numbers. 5 About thirty-five 
years ago Mr. Davis paged the Book consecutively in lead pencil. 
In these printed volumes, Mr. Davis's notation is followed, his page 
numbers being given in heavy face type within square brackets. In 
the collation which follows, A represents Mr. Davis's notation. 
B represents the pagination which begins with the first page and can 
be easily identified as far as 47. It would seem as if the Book had 



1 That these six Books were so numbered by Wadsworth is proved negatively 
by the fact that until his day they were always cited by title, and positively by 
the fact that the numbers to the five Books extant (College Book II having been 
destroyed in 1764: see p. xviii, below) are in Wadsworth's handwriting. 

2 The following pages are blank: 2, 4, 7, 8, 12, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 29, 32, 
36; 38, 40, 42, 47, 48, 54, 56, 58, 62, 71-74, 86-88, 90, 92, 100, 134-163, 167-181, 
207-249, 251-258, 265-267, 269-271, 273-353. 

3 Pp. 82-129, below. The names in this list are not included in the index to 
the present volumes. 

4 See Sibley's note, p. 171 note 2, below. 

5 This fact makes cross references difficult to identify. 



DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE BOOK I 



XV 



been made up by binding together several quires, each quire having 
originally been used for a separate purpose. However that may have 
been, it is certain that the first quire was intended to be paged from 
1 to 24, but through inadvertence the leaf containing pages 8-9 
was overlooked and the numbers run from 1 to 22, instead of from 
1 to 24. This notation, with the consequent error, is continued 
through pages 23-47, which ought to have been numbered 25-49. 
These numbers are found on the outer corner of the leaves, except 
on pages 14, 16, 18, and 20, where they are in the middle. By whom 
these figures were inserted is unknown, but apparently they were 
not inserted very early. C represents a third series, which begins 
on the 23rd page of B, but the 25th page of the Book, the figures 
running from 1 to 227, though page [29] was not numbered at all, 
pages [31-32] were numbered 1 and 2, and the page numbers 199- 
202 and 219-222 were inadvertently omitted. The figures of series 
C are mostly, if not wholly, in the hand of President Wadsworth. 1 
Finally, D gives the pages of Volume XV — that is, the present 
volume. 

Collation of Paginations 



A 


B 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


5 


6 


6 


7 


7 


8 




9 




10 


8 


11 


9 


12 


10 


13 


11 


14 


12 


15 


13 


16 


14 


17 


15 


18 


16 


19 


17 



D 


A 


B 


C 


D 


3 


20 


18 








21 


19 




12 


4 


22 


20 








23 


21 




13-14 


5 


24 


22 






5 


25 


23 


1 


14-15 




26 


24 


2 






27 


25 


3 


16 


5-7 


28 


26 


4 




7 


29 


27 






8 


30 


28 


5 


17-19 




31 


29 


1 


19 


8-9 


32 


30 


2 




10 


33 


31 


7 


20 


10-11 


34 


32 


8 


20-21 




35 


33 


9 


21 


11-12 


36 


34 


10 






37 


35 


11 


22 


12 


38 


36 


12 





1 Still another series was begun on page 182 of A, but as it was continued 
through three pages only, it need not be included in the collation: see p. 134 
note 2, below. 



m 






INTRODUCTION 


A 


B 


C 


D 


A 


39 


37 


13 


23 


89 


40 


38 


14 




90 


41 


39 


15 


24 


91 


42 


40 


16 




92 


43 


41 


17 


24-27 


93 


44 


42 


18 


27-29 


94 


45 


43 


19 


29-31 


95 


46 


44 


20 


31 


96 


47 


45 


21 




97 


48 


46 


22 




98 


49 


47 


23 


32-33 


99 


50 




21 


33-35 


100 


51 




25 


35-36 


101 


52 




26 


36 


102 


53 




27 


36-38 


103 


54 




28 




104 


55 




29 


38-39 


105 


56 




30 




106 


57 




31 


39-40 


107 


58 




32 




108 


59 




33 


40-42 


109 


60 




34 


42-43 


110 


61 




35 


43-44 


111 


62 




36 




112 


63 




37 


45-47 


113 


64 




38 


47-48 


114 


65 




39 


49-51 


115 


66 




40 


51 


116 


67 




41 


51-52 


117 


68 




42 


52-53 


118 


69 




43 


53-55 


119 


70 




44 


55 


120 


71-74 




45-48 




121 


75 




49 


55-50 


122 


76 




50 


56-58 


123 


77 




51 


58-SO 


124 


78 




52 


60-61 


125 


79 




53 


61-62 


126 


80 




54 


62-64 


127 


81 




55 


65-66 


128 


82 




56 


66-68 


129 


S3 




57 


68-70 


130 


84 




58 


70-72 


131 


85 




59 


72-74 


132 


86-S8 




60-62 




133 



C 


D 


63 


74-75 


64 




65 


75-76 


66 




67 


76-77 


68 


78-79 


69 


79-80 


70 


80-81 


71 


81 


72 


81 


73 


81 


74 




75 


82-83 


76 


84-85 


77 


85-87 


78 


87-88 


79 » 


88-90 


80 


90-92 


81 


92-94 


82 


94-95 


83 


96-97 


84 


97-98 


85 


99-100 


86 


100-101 


87 


101-102 


88 


103-104 


89 


104-105 


90 


105-107 


91 


107-108 


92 


108-110 


93 


110-111 


94 


111-113 


95 


113-114 


98 


114-116 


97 


116-117 


98 


117-118 


99 


118-120 


100 


120-121 


101 


121-123 


102 


123-124 


103 


124-125 


104 


125-126 


105 


126-127 


106 


128-129 


107 


129 



1 This page was by mistake numbered "83," then that figure was crossed out 
and "79" written above it, the top of the leaf having been trimmed off. 



DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE BOOK II 



XV11 



A 3 


3 C 


D 


A B 


C 


D 


134^163 


108-137 




201 


175 


150-151 


164 


138 


129-131 


202 


176 


151-152 


165 


139 


131-132 


203 


177 


152-153 


166 


140 


132-134 


204 


178 


153-154 


167-181 


141-155 




205 


179 


154 


182 


156 


134-135 


206 


180 


154-155 


183 


157 


135-136 


207-224 


181-198 




184 


158 


136-137 


225-240 


203 x -218 




185 


159 


137 


241-245 


223 2 -227 3 




186 


160 


137-138 


246-249 






187 


161 


138-139 


250 




167-168 


188 


162 


139-140 


251-258 






189 


163 


140-141 


259 




166-167 


190 


164 


141-142 


260 




165-166 


191 


165 


142-143 


261 




163-165 


192 


166 


143-144 


262 




162-163 


193 


167 


144-145 


263 




160-162 


194 


168 


145 


264 




158-160 


195 


169 


145-146 


265-267 






196 


170 


146-147 


268 




157-158 


197 


171 


147-148 


269-271 






198 


172 


148-149 


272 




156 


199 


173 


149-150 


273-353 






200 


174 


150 


354 




155-156 



College Book II 

This Book was originally known as "Old Overseers' Book." That 
it was numbered College Book 2 by President Wadsworth is cer- 
tain, though the fact cannot be demonstrated by the Book itself, 
since that is no longer extant. But that it must have been so num- 
bered is proved by the entries in President Wadsworth's Index and 
by numerous references to it under that title scattered through 
College Books I, III, and IV. 4 Since 1764 there has been some un- 
certainty about College Book II and some confusion between it and 
College Book I. "The early Records of the College," wrote Presi- 
dent Quincy, "which embrace the occurrences of the first century 

1 At this point President Wadsworth apparently made a mistake, for he num- 
bered this page not "199" but "203," thus dropping out four figures. 

2 At this point President Wadsworth again apparently made an error, as he 
numbered this page "223" instead of "219," thus once more dropping out four 
figures. 

3 At this point President Wadsworth stopped his notation, and thereafter no 
page is numbered, except in Mr. Davis's notation. 

4 For these references, see the index to the present volumes. 



XV111 INTRODUCTION 

after its foundation, are contained in three books, denominated 
College Books, Xos. I., III., and IV. There is none extant denomi- 
nated Xo. II.; but that which is now called Xo. I., and by President 
Wadsworth is referred to as such, is sometimes in later College Books 
referred to as Xo. II." 1 If by "later College Books" President 
Quincy meant those compiled after 1764, the statement may be cor- 
rect ; but the present Editor has found no instance in any records com- 
piled before 17G4 where College Book I was "referred to as Xo. II." 
In 1773 the Rev. Dr. Andrew Eliot 2 compiled the early portion 
of Donation Book I. In the preface to the volume he says: 

This Account of the Benefactions to Harvard College is collected 
from the College Books of Records; and such other Helps as could be 
obtained. . . . 

Other Inaccuracies & mistakes will doubtless be found. Imperfect 
as it is, this work hath been attended with no small labor and difficulty, 
owing in a great measure, to the loss of several Books of record, when 
Harvard Hall was consumed among which were the first or 3 most an- 
cient — and the Book that contained the particular Donations to the 

Librar ^ A: Eliot * 

At page 51 of the same book we read: 

An Account of the Burning of Harvard Hall. 
In the Night after the twenty fourth of Jan y 1764 Harvard Hall was 
entirely consumed by Fire, with the Library which the Freinds of the 
College had been collecting for more than a Century, and which by the 
Munificence of Benefactors was now become large and valuable, to- 
gether with the Apparatus, the Portraits of Duns-Scotus Keckerman, 
M r Baxter, M r Penoyer, The generous M r Hollis — many valuable 

1 History of Harvard University, i. 449. In one place an unfortunate mis- 
print occurs in Quincy's History, where (i. 451) College Book IV is called "Col- 
lege Book No. VI." 

8 Quincy says that Donation Book I was "prepared under the care of the 
Rev. Andrew Eliot, then a member of the Corporation" (History, i. 494). There 
were two Andrew Eliots, both at that time members of the Corporation: the Rev. 
Dr. Andrew Eliot (1737), and his son the Rev. Andrew Eliot (1762). It was the 
former who prepared Donation Book I. See p. lxix note, below. 

8 Written over "and," crossed out. 

4 This is an autograph signature. Among the College archives is a volume 
(marked UA. 13.10) labelled on the back of the cover: "Benefactors of Harvard 
College." Presumably this was the book prepared by Dr. Eliot himself, and later 
copied into Donation Book I by his son Josiah Eliot: see p. lxix note, below. 



ENTRIES IN WADSWORTH S INDEX ABOUT COLLEGE BOOK II XIX 

Curiosities, The first Book of the College records, and a Manuscript 
Catalogue of the Books in the Library, with the names of it's Bene- 
factors, and their particular Donations. 1 

By "the first or most ancient" Book and by "The first Book of the 
College records" was meant not the Book numbered I but the "most 
ancient" — that is, College Book II. When Quincy became Presi- 
dent in 1829, there was no one connected with the College who had 
seen College Book II, and when, presumably during his presidency, 2 
College Book I was bound, the back of the cover was erroneously 
labelled "College Book No. 1 & 2." 

But though destroyed in 1764, "the more valuable portions" of 
College Book II have, as Mr. Davis remarks, "probably been pre- 
served" through transcripts entered in College Books I and III. In 
addition to these transcripts, which can easily be found through the 
index to the present volumes, there are the following entries relating 
to College Book II in President Wadsworth's Index: 

Entries in Wadsworth's Index Relating to College Book II 3 

B 
Not board out of Coll. without leave. (B.2.p.21.) 

C 

Comencement. order'd Dec. 5. 1683. to be on y e first wenesday of July. . . . 
B.2.p.74. 



1 An account of the fire, taken from the Boston News Letter of February 2, 
1764, is reprinted in Quincy's History, ii. 480-483. Another account, written 
January 30 by Margaret Mascarene, a daughter of President Holyoke, to her 
husband John Mascarene in London, is printed in full in the Harvard Register 
(1881), iii. 294-297, and in part in our Publications, xiv. 3 note 5, 

2 See Sibley's note, p. 171 note 2, below. 

3 This Index consists of 28 unnumbered pages, measuring 6| inches in width 
by 14 in height. On the recto of the first leaf is written "Index" in the hand of 
President Wadsworth. The name of the compiler is nowhere given, but President 
Wadsworth's peculiarly characteristic handwriting is unmistakable. There are, 
however, a few additions (perhaps thirty) in the hand of President Holyoke. 

Owing to interlineations, erasures, the occasional omission of carets, and the 
underscoring of many words, the Index presents some difficulties. In most cases, 
only the references to College Book II are extracted here, but in a few instances 
references to other Books are included. 

The two following entries occur in the Index under " E " and " P," respectively: 

M r Nath 1 Eaton, chosen President or Professor. 1637. Put down by y e Court 
for severe usage of y e scholars. 1639. B.3.p.2.3. 

M r Nath 1 Eaton chosen President or Professor of y e Coll. An. 1637. B.3.p.2. 



XX INTRODUCTION 

Cofiions, not live out of, em w th out leave (B.2.p.21) a month, without penalty of 
excision. 

Common-placing, if numbers small, once a month. B.2.p.24. 

Commencers, not have more than one Gallon wine; methods to prevent disorders 
at Commencents. B.2.p.37.71. 3 gallons allow'd. p. 71. 

Comencement (see B.l.p.63.) 1 order'd to be on y e second wenesday in sept, & 
to continue so. 20.5.1682. B.2.p.73. 

Corporation & overseers, 2 sometimes B.2.p.26.29.31. 3 met at y e same time. 
B.l.p.56. 

The overseers directed commanded (An. 1674. B.l.p.51) 4 y e Corporation (An. 
1667) to take care about regulating Inconveniencies & disorders at Com- 
mencement. B. 2. p. 26. 71. 

Comencement, how manag'd, 1681, wn no President. B.2.p.70.71. 

D 

Dues to y e Coll. to be p d to y e steward. B.2.p.4. 5 B.l.p.23. B.2.p.21.30. 

Detriment, 5 s a quarter for those who live out of Coll. A.D. 1660. B.2.p.21. 

first 6 Degree (An. 1654) deni'd to those of 3. years standing. B.2.p.5. 7 

A scholar in debt above .20. days, to be turn'd out of his study. B.2.p.6. In 
debt above a month after Quarter Bill given in, to be look'd on as not belong- 
ing to y e Coll. B.2.p.21. See B.3.p.23.4. To pay a Quarter's due before 
hand, & yt from time to time. B.2.30. 

E 
Coll. Exercises as Coin, placing, disputing, declaiming 8 neglected, punishable 

by y e President not exceeding. 5 s . B.3.p.25. B.2.p.24. 
Coll. Estate. B.2.p.l8.19. B.3.p.41. 

F 
Fellows, their Instalment. B.l.p.27. See B.5.4to.p.34.53 &c. 9 must dwell, 

lodge, in Coll. be in y e Hall at meal times. 1666. B.2.p.25. B.3.p.25. 
Freshmen, not to be compelTd by sen rs B.3.p.27. 10 B.l.p.51. See p. 57. Webb's 

case. 11 See B.2.p.30. 
Fellows, in want of a President, to carry on Coll. affairs. B.2.p.39.70. B.3.p.39. 
Fellows, yr. chambers rent free. B.2.p.4. 



1 The words "(see B.l.p.63.)" are interlined. 

2 Here "once" is crossed out. 

3 The words "sometimes B.2. p. 26.29.31." are interlined. 

* The words "commanded (An. 1674. B.l.p.51)" are interlined. 
6 The words "to y e steward. B.2.p.4." are interlined. 

6 The word "first" is interlined. 

7 This entry appears to throw light on the obscure matter of the change in the 
course of study from three years to four years: see Mr. William C. Lane's article 
on "Harvard Broadsides," in Proceedings American Antiquarian Society, Oc- 
tober, 1914, xxiv. 275-279; and cf. our Publications, xviii. 324-325. 

8 The words "as Coiii. placing, disputing, declaiming" are interlined. 

8 The words "See B.5.4to.p.34.53 &c. " are interlined. See p.xxix note 2, below. 

10 The words "B.3.p.27." are interlined." 

u The words "See. p. 57. Webb's case." are interlined. 



ENTRIES IN WADSWORTH S INDEX ABOUT COLLEGE BOOK II XXI 

Fellows, difference of yr salaries, B.3-P.54. 1 why. B.4.p.l7.24.25.26.27. B.2.p.32. 
Fellows salary. . . . 12 11 An. 1654. B.2.p.3. chabers rent free. p. 4. 
Charlestown Ferry, let at. 40 11 1654. B.2.p.3. 

The Sen r Fellow, to be a Proctor, or visitor (suppos'd to be at corhencement 
time) to visit chambers, suppress disorders &c. B.2.p.37.71. 

G 
A gift to y e Coll. of .60 11 per An. for .7. years (An. 1669) from Gentlemen at 
Portsmouth, Pascataqua. B.2.p.32. 

I 

M r Chauncey Instali'd President. 27. of y e 9 th . 1654. B.2.p.l6. 

L 

Coll. Laws Latin, p. 19. 2 An. 1642-1646. B.l.p.17. &. 37. 3 &. An. 1650. p.18. 

p.23.24. B.2.p.21-23. 4 B.3.p.l9-22-25.36. 5 
Library, laws about it. Book 1. 138. 6 B.2.p.27. 
Lands belonging to y e Coll. B.2.p.38. 

O 
Overseers of y e Coll. . . . chose a Clark. B.2.p.3. An. 1654. 

P 

President's House & 7 fence mended by y e Treasurer. B.4.p.5. 8 BA.p.41.52. 

. . . B.2.p.48. 9 ... 2 s a quarter out of every Scholar's Tuition money, went 

to y e President's salary. B.2.p.3. house repair'd. 33. 10 His House & Land 

rent free. B.2.p.3.7. B.2.48. 
When y e President's place was offer'd to m r Chauncey. A.D. 1654. an. 100 11 

salary was offer'd at y e same time. B.2.p.l5. 
President, 10 n gratuity from y e Coll. to him; 10 11 more gratuity y e same year. 

1660. B.2.p.22. & twice in. 1667. p. 31. once. 1671. p. 35. 
Punishment, to y e sum of. 5 s may be Inflicted by the President may punish u for 

y e neglecting of Coll. exercises, disputing, declaiming &c. A.D. 1663. B.2.p.24. 
Punishment corporal, in case. B.2.p.30. 

Portsmouth Donation of 60 11 per An. for .7. year from 1669. B.2.p.32. 
President Chauncey, buried at College charge. B.2.p.39. 12 
When President's place vacant, Fellows to do y e work & have greater allowance 

for it. B.2.p.39.70. 



1 The words "B.3.p.54." are interlined. 

2 The words "Latin, p. 19." are interlined. 

3 "&.37" is interlined. 

4 The "3" in "23" is not certain, as the figure has been trimmed off. 
6 The words "B.3.p.l9-22-25.36." are interlined. 

6 The words "Book 1. 138." are interlined in the hand of President Holyoke. 

7 The words "House &" are interlined. 

8 The words "B.4.p.5." are interlined. 

9 The words "B.2.p.48." are interlined. 

10 The words "house repair'd. 33." are interlined. 

11 The words "may punish" are interlined. 

12 The same entry was made lower down on the page and then crossed out. 



XX11 INTRODUCTION 

President's Salary (An. 1654. B.2.p.3) l p. 7, Judg'd by y e overseers. 1672. 

sh d be. 150 11 at least y e General Court to be address'd about it. B.2.p.47.49. 
Coll. gave. 100 11 to defray y c Charge of D r Hoar's trasportation from Engl, he 

being chosen President. B.2.p.51. 
President's horse 2 B.4.p.85 3 repair'd B.2.p.33.35.48. 4 kept at Coll. charge, 

B.4.p.5. bought p. 11. a present. 70 11 to Pres. p. 11. 
Coll. Plate (An. 1654. wt. B.2.p.l9) 5 to be lodg'd w th y e President. B.3.p.64. 6 

B.l.p.52. wt there was. 1674. p. 53 7 
President had 2 9 per quarter of tuition money & House & Land rent-free. 8 B.2.p.3. 

Q 9 

Quarter's dues to be paid from time to time before hand. B.2.p. 30.62. 

R 

Repairs of publick Coll. Damages, to be at y e charge of all y e Undergraduates. 

A.D. 1663. B.2.p.23. 
M r Dunster resign'd his Presidentship. 24 of y 6 . 8 th . 1654. B.2.p.l5. 
D r Hoar resign'd his Presidentship. 15-1. 1675. B.2.p.63. 

S 
M r Sedgwick's gift of a shop to y e Coll. 1646. . . . B.2.p.l9. 
Scholars of y e House, their Duty. B.l.p.27.38. 4 Scholarships. B.2.p.l9. 
Coll. Stock. . . . 1654. B.2.p.l8.19. 

Coll. Stock, Incomes of it to maintain Coll. officers. B.2.p.30. 
Coll. steward to collect all college quarterly dues. B.2.p.4. 

T 

Tutors Salary. 4 11 per. An. B.l.p.3. & A.D. 1654. y e 3. Fellows had, y e first. 
12 n y e 2 nd n ii y e 3d 10 n per An (in 1654 B.2.p.3.4) besides w* yy had from 
their Pupils' Addition in different degrees to yr Salaries. B.2.p.32. B.4.p.24. 

Fellows had, chambers & studies rent free. B.2.p.4. 

For Tuition, some gave more some less. B.2.p.4. 

Tuition-money (as well as other College dues) to be paid to y e Coll. Steward. 
B.2.p.4. 

W 
M r Nath 1 Ward's conveyance 10 of .600. Acres to y e College. 1646. B.l.p.ll. 
B.2.p.l9. B.3.p.7. 



1 The words "(An. 1654. B.2.p.3)" are interlined. 

2 Altered from "house." 

3 The words " B.4.p.85 " are interlined. This reference is to the President's 
House (p. 485, below). 

4 The words "repair'd B.2.p.33.35.48." are interlined. 

6 The words " (An. 1654. wt. B.2.p.l9) " are interlined. 

6 The words "B.3.p.64." are interlined. 

7 The words "wt there was. 1674. p. 53" are interlined. 

8 The words "& House & Land rent-free" are interlined. 

9 In the original the entries under Q are placed after Z. 

10 Written above "gift," crossed out. 



DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE BOOK III Xxiii 

College Book III 

This Book contains one unnumbered leaf (the recto of which has 
only the inscription mentioned below, the verso being blank), 170 
numbered pages, and one unnumbered and blank leaf — or 174 
pages in all. Of the 170 numbered pages, 10 are blank. 1 The leaves 
measure 9 inches in width by 14 inches in height. It contains Cor- 
poration meetings, Overseers' meetings, descriptions and plans of 
College property, specimens of college diplomas, and some mis- 
cellaneous records. 

Previous to 1725, this Book was known as "Thin Parchment Book 
of Records. " At the top of the recto of the first leaf (which, as 
stated above, is unnumbered) is this inscription: 

The Colledge Book N° 3 

The words "The Colledge Book" are in an unknown hand; the 
words "N° 3" are in the hand of President Wadsworth. 

The pagination of this Book is, owing to errors, somewhat con- 
fusing. Beginning with the recto of the second leaf, page numbers 
were inserted by Thomas Danforth, 2 and later by President Wads- 
worth, 3 both of whom made mistakes; then by President Holyoke; 4 
and finally, in pencil, by Mr. Davis. 5 These numberings are shown 
in the table on the following page, where A, B, C, and D, represent 
respectively the notations of Mr. Davis, Danforth, Wadsworth, and 
Holyoke, while E gives the pages of Volume XV — that is, the 
present volume. 



1 The blank pages are 38, 89, 132-136, 159, 167. 

2 Danforth made two errors. After correctly numbering 39 pages, he in- 
advertently numbered the next page 30 instead of 40; and he numbered two 
pages 47. Hence his numbers after the first 39 should have been not 30-77, but 
40-88. 

8 Wadsworth altered Danforth's 30-77 to 40-87, but failed to note Dan- 
forth's error in assigning the number 47 to two pages. Hence Wadsworth's 
numbers after the first 57 should have been not 57-120, but 58-121. 

4 Holyoke failed to notice Wadsworth's error of one page, and so inserted 
numbers 121-124 instead of 122-125. 

5 As the first 57 pages were correctly numbered by Wadsworth, Mr. Davis's 
figures in pencil begin at page 58 and are given within square brackets in the text 
of this volume. 



XXIV 



INTRODUCTION 



Collation of Paginations 



A 


B 


C 


D E 

j 




1-37 




171-206 




38 










39 






206-207 




30 


40 




207 




31-46 


41-56 




208-221 




47 


57 > 




222 


5S 2 


47 


57 




222-223 


50-88 


48-77 3 


57-87 




223-262 


89 




88 






00-121 




89-120 4 




263-297 


122-125 






121-124 5 


298-301 


120-170 








301-332 



College Book IV 

This Book contains 352 numbered pages, of which 8 are blank. 6 
The leaves measure 9 inches in width by 14 in height. The first 
five leaves and the last leaf are unnumbered and blank, 7 except that 
at the top of the recto of the first leaf are the words : 

The Colledge Book, N°. 4. 

The words "The Colledge Book" are in an unknown hand; the words 
"N°. 4." are in the hand of President Wadsworth. When bound, 
in President Quincy's day, the back of the cover was labelled " Col- 
lege Book No. 4 & 5." For an explanation of this error, see page 
xxviii, below. 

The make-up of this Book has caused comment, but presents no 
difficulty. Though the Colony Charter of 1629 was vacated in 
1684, yet the government continued under it until May, 1686, the 
General Court meeting for the last time on the 21st of that month. 8 



1 To this point, Wadsworth's notation is given within square brackets in the 
text of this volume. 

8 See the last note but one. 

3 Here Danforth's numbering ends. 

* Here Wadsworth's numbering ends. 

5 Here Holyoke's numbering ends. 

6 The blank pages are 4, 321-326, 331. 

7 Cf. p. 335 note 1, below. 

8 Not May 20, 1686, as given in the Massachusetts Colony Records, v. 517: 
see our Publications, vi. 81-82. 



DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE BOOK IV XXV 

Meanwhile Edward Randolph had reached Boston on May 14, 
bringing with him an Exemplification of the Judgment against the 
Charter and a Commission (dated October 8, 1685) for Joseph 
Dudley as President of the Council for New England. The new 
government was inaugurated on May 25, and on July 20 the follow- 
ing proceedings took place : 

At a Councill held at Boston in New England July 20 th 1686. 

Present. 

Joseph Dudley Esquire President 

William Stoughton Esq r D.P. 

John Pincheon p re Peter Bulkley _ p and John Usher Esq re 

Wait Winthrop q Rich d Wharton ^ sq 

The Colledg of Cambridge being in an unsettled posture by the late 
alteration of the Government, and M r Increase Mather dismissing him- 
self from further care and service there, the Councill have agreed to 
meet there upon Fryday next 23 rd Inst* to consider of some form of 
settlement thereof; M r Mather to have notice given him of said Meet- 
ing, and be desired to be there present; likewise 

Ordered: That the rules and orders drawn up by said M r Mather 
referring to the Government of the Schollars there presented to the 
Councill for consideration be inclosed and directed unto M r John Leverett 
for his own, and the other Principall Schollars (now upon the place) 
their perusall and consideration of what may be needfull to be further 
added thereto respecting the Disputations and exercises of the Grad- 
uates, or any other thing. 1 

The proceedings at the meeting on July 23, when it was agreed 
that Increase Mather " be desired to accept of the Rectorship of the 
Colledge, & make his Usuall Visitations," and that John Leverett 
and William Brattle "be the Tut rs , & enter upon the Governm* of 
the Colledge, & manage the publick reading in the hall," were im- 
mediately recorded on the first page of what is now the back end of 



1 Council Records, ii. 52-53: cf. 2 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical 
Society, xiii. 257. One item relating to the College, as it is not entered in College 
Book IV, may be given from another source: "At a Meeting of the Councill at 
Cambridge in New England July 23 rd 1686. [Present those mentioned in the 
text and in addition Bartholomew Gedney.l Ordered. That . . . Major Richards, 
M r Simon Lynd and Capt n Hammond appointed a Committee to examine the 
accounts of M r Danforth as Steward of the Colledge" (Council Records, ii. 58: 
cf. 2 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, xiii. 260). 



XXVI INTRODUCTION 

College Book IV, 1 and the College Laws adopted on the same day 
were entered a few pages farther on. 2 Following the proceedings of 
the Council on July 23, come the records of the Rector and Tutors 
from October 1, 1G86, to April 22, 1G87, 3 and of the Corporation from 
June 2, 1690, to December 24, 1691. 4 

Joseph Dudley remained President of the Council for New Eng- 
land from May 25 to December 20, 1686, and was succeeded by Sir 
Edmund Andros as Governor of the Territory and Dominion of 
New England from December 20, 1686, to his overthrow on April 
18, 1689. On April 20, 1689, a Council for Safety of the People and 
Conservation of the Peace was appointed; the Representatives met 
on May 9 and 22; on May 24 the government was settled as of 
May, 1686, but no assumption of Charter government was intended; 
the Representatives met again on June 5, 1689; on June 7 govern- 
ment under the Charter of 1629 was resumed; and the Court met for 
the last time on May 6, 1692. Meanwhile the Province Charter 
had been granted by William and Mary on October 7, 1691, and Sir 
William Phips had been commissioned Governor on December 12, 
1691. He reached Boston May 14, 1692, and was inaugurated 
May 16. 5 

Though there was apparently little or no formal legislation about 
the College during the administration of Andros and perhaps none 
at all during the period between April 18, 1689, and May 16, 1692, 



1 Pp. 827-828, below. In a letter dated March 29, 1688, Randolph said: 
"(during my absence to seme a Quo Warr to ag* the Colony of Connecticott, 
M r Dudley Presid* M r Stoughton Dep ty presid* with 5 of the Members of the 
Councill take vpon them the Regulation of the Colledge (but no Order or direc- 
tion from his Ma tie for so doing) and in stead of a President and ffellowes make 
a Rector and Tutors: as by the Inclosed pretended order of Presid* and Councill 
doth appeare: so that now Increase Mather: to that day President of the Col- 
ledge was continued but by the name and office of Rector" (in Toppan's Edward 
Randolph, Prince Society, vi. 245). May not the change in title have been made 
merely to distinguish the head of the College from the head of the civil govern- 
ment, the latter then being "President of the Council for New England"? Dr. 
William Douglass made a similar suggestion: "When Mr. Dudley was President 
of New England, for distinction the President of the college was called Rector" 
(Summary, 1749, i. 540 note). 

2 Pp. 828-832, below. 
8 P. 828, below. 

4 Pp. 828-832, below. 

6 Cf. our Publications, vi. 81-82, xvii. 4, 5, 7, 14, 28, 44. 



DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE BOOK V IN FOLIO XXvii 

yet Andros and Randolph both took a very active interest in the 
affairs of the institution. 1 On June 27, 1692, a new College Charter 
was passed. Immediately the College authorities reversed College 
Book IV and caused the new Charter to be recorded, beginning on 
what is now page 1 of the volume. Following this come the Cor- 
poration meetings from July 26, 1692, to September 5, 1750, in- 
cluding a few Overseers' meetings. 2 The few pages between the 
Corporation records (1692-1750) and the records of the Rector and 
Tutors (1686-1687) and of the Corporation (1690-1691) are filled 
with some ceremonies connected with the inaugurations of Presi- 
dents Wadsworth and Holyoke, an account of bequests to the Col- 
lege, the College Laws of 1686, and a few miscellaneous matters. 

College Book V in Folio (Treasurer Brattle's Book) 

This Book is referred to indifferently as College Book V or as 
College Book V in Folio. It contains one unnumbered leaf and 134 
numbered pages, — or 136 pages in all. Pages 1-9 contain letters 
and petitions dating from October 16, 1693, to May 14, 1713; pages 
10-18 are blank; pages 19-22 contain a Corporation meeting of 
May 8, 1693, and various matters from 1693 to 1712; page 23 is 
blank; pages 24-122 contain Treasurer Brattle's accounts from 1693 



1 The only allusion to Andros in the records here printed, except a casual one, 
is to the effect that the "substance" of a certain donation account was delivered 
to him: see p. 256, below. Unfortunately, owing to the fact that the bottom of 
the page has been trimmed off, it is impossible to decipher the date; but this was 
doubtless between August 1 and 5, 1687: see our Publications, i. 206, and a letter 
from Randolph dated August 5, 1687, in which he says: "his Excellence calls 
to account the Managers of the publick money of the Colledge and finds M r 
Stoughton and M r Dudley haue lately altered the Security of some [of] it and 
made about 100 lb payable to them and their heires you may see what Justice his 
Ma tie may expect from such Judges" (in Toppan's Edward Randolph, Prince 
Society, vi. 225). The only allusions to Harvard College in the Dudley Records 
(2 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, xiii. 226-286) are those quoted 
in the text or footnote on p. xxv, above. The Andros Records (Proceedings 
American Antiquarian Society, 1899, xiii. 239-268) contain no allusions to Har- 
vard College. For Randolph's activities in regard to the College, see Toppan's 
Edward Randolph, i. 71-72, 222-223, 225, 293, 297, 302, 307, iii. 290, iv. 90, 95, 
96, vi. 29-30, 225, 244-247. 

2 The Corporation meetings after September 5, 1750, are recorded in College 
Book VII, showing that President Holyoke respected his predecessor's number- 
ings of College Books I-VI. 



XXY111 INTRODUCTION 

to May 11, 1713; pages 123-134 are blank. There are various 
marginal notes by President Wadsworth. 

Previous to 1725, this Book was known as Treasurer Brattle's 
Book. On the recto of the first leaf is written, in the hand of 
President Wadsworth: 

College Book N° 5. In Folio 
The verso of the first leaf is blank, but pasted to it is the following — ■ 

Note 

This volume, called College Book N° 5, in folio, was one of the books 
detained by John Hancock when he ceased to be Treasurer of the Col- 
lege. It was found and restored to the College some twenty years ago 
together with the old Treasurer's book of John Richards (1669- ) 
with which it was long tied up in one parcel. Being in much better 
condition than its companion it was finally removed to be repaired. It 
was kept by the Brattles. 

March 10 th 1887 



W. H. TlLLINGHAST l 



John Plancock was Treasurer from 1773 to 1777. When, more than 
fifty years later, College Book IV was bound in President Quincy's 
day, there could have been no one connected with the College who 
had seen Treasurer Brattle's Book, and all knowledge of it had 
doubtless disappeared: hence the error in labelling the cover of Col- 
lege Book IV as "College Book No. 4 & 5." 



1 While Treasurer, Hancock had sent to him in Philadelphia "all his books and 
papers " (Quincy, History, ii. 182-209). The papers were returned to the College, 
but at least three of the books remained in Hancock's possession and were not re- 
stored to the College until 1860-1862, when they were found in the stable of the 
Hancock mansion in Boston. These were Treasurer Richards's Book (1669- 
11)93), Treasurer Brattle's Book (1693-1713), and Treasurer Hutchinson's Book 
(1721-1752). See Sibley's account of Treasurer Richards's Book and Treas- 
urer Brattle's Book, and description of with extracts from the volumes, in 1 Pro- 
ceedings Massachusetts Historical Society (1862), vi. 337-354. The Brattle 
Book is fairly well preserved, but not so the Richards Book, which it is to 
be regretted was not copied in full by Sibley, for some of the entries he did 
copy cannot now, though the volume has been mercerized, be deciphered in 
the original. 

In 1800 Steward Chesholme's Account Book (1650-1659). and five similar 
books (1703-1749) kept by the two Andrew Bordmans who were Stewards in 
1703-1717 and 1747-1750 respectively, were returned to the College: see 1 Pro- 
ceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, v. 60-63, 154-158. 



DESCRIPTION OF COLLEGE BOOK V IN QUARTO XXIX 

College Book V in Quarto (President Leverett's Diary) 

In 1912 the Editor wrote: 

In addition to this " College Book V in Folio," there was also at one 
time a volume known as " College Book V in Quarto/' as appears from 
various references to it by Wadsworth in the marginal entries in the 
Corporation Records. This volume was either burned in 1764, or has 
disappeared, or cannot now be identified. 1 

The Editor has since identified the book as President Leverett's 
Diary. It contains two unnumbered leaves at the beginning, then 
pages numbered 1 to 262, and then four unnumbered leaves — mak- 
ing 274 pages in all. The leaves measure 5% inches in width by 7 in 
height. The entries extend from October 28, 1707, to March 28, 
1724. On a fly-leaf at the end is written: "The children of the late 
Doctor Wigglesworth, present this manuscript volume, with their 
best respects, to the Corporation of Harvard College. 1797." The 
inscription on the back of the vellum cover is difficult to decipher, 
but apparently reads as follows: " Pres Leverett Gift of Dr. Wiggles- 
worth's Children." 2 There is in the book itself no title, but the 
volume is usually known and cited as " President Leverett's Diary." 
The word "Diary" is a misnomer, inasmuch as the volume is not a 
diary at all, but is really a book of College records. It is wholly in 
the hand of President Leverett, and contains, besides some mis- 
cellaneous matter, certain meetings of the Corporation which are 
not in the Corporation Records themselves. 3 Hence it supplements 
the latter. 



1 "Notes on the Harvard College Records, 1636-1800," in our Publications, 
xiv. 314 note 1. 

2 Leverett died May 3, 1724. The fact that Wadsworth called the Diary 
College Book V in Quarto indicates both that he regarded it as a book of College 
records, as it was, and that the Diary was in his time in the possession of the Col- 
lege, as it ought to have been. By "the late Doctor Wigglesworth" is doubtless 
meant the Rev. Dr. Edward Wigglesworth, who graduated in 1749 and died in 
1794. He was the son of the Rev. Dr. Edward Wigglesworth (1710), who mar- 
ried Sarah Leverett, a daughter of President Leverett. Presumably at some 
time, perhaps on the death of Wadsworth or later, the Diary was claimed by 
Dr. Wigglesworth or his widow or his son, and was allowed by the College to fall 
into private hands. 

3 The discovery that College Book V in Quarto and Leverett's Diary were 
identical enables the Editor to correct several errors into which President Wads- 



XXX INTRODUCTION 

College Book VI (Hollis Book) 

This is variously called College Book VI or Hollis Book. The 
leaves measure 8 inches in width by V2Y2 inches in height. The 
volume contains about 129 leaves, but they are mostly unnumbered 
and blank. The first two leaves are unnumbered and blank, except 
that at the top of the recto of the first leaf is written in President 
Wadsworth's hand: 

College Book N°. 6. in Folio. 1 

On the recto of the third leaf (or page 1) is the following entry in 
the hand of Wadsworth: 

Anno Dom. 1726. This Book belongs to Harvard College 
in Cambridge in New England. 
At a Meeting of y e Corporation of Harvard College at 
Cambridge April. 4. 1726. 
1 Voted, that m r Treasurer procure a Book, into which shall be trans- 
' mitted, and a Register kept of, m r Hollis's Rules, Orders, Gifts & Boun- 
ties past and to come; together with y e names, age, and character of 
'his scholars, the time of their Entry & dismission; and also all y e Votes 
'of y e overseers & Corporation from time to time relating to y e said 
' orders, Bounties and scholas of y e said m r Hollis. 

Pursuant to y e Vote above, this Book was procured by y e College 
Treasurer at the College charge. An. Dom. 1726. 
I shall therefore Insert m r Hollis's orders &c. 

Pages 1-34 contain entries in Wadsworth's hand extending from 
April 4, 1726, to October 11, 1736; page 34 contains an entry dated 



worth inadvertently fell. In several cross references in the margins of College 
Book IV, he wrote " Book V " by mistake for " Book V in 4to." The same blunder 
was committed by Wadsworth in his Index, where appear several entries relat- 
ing to College Book V and to Leverett's Diary. The text of these volumes was 
cast before this identification had been made, and hence several footnotes need 
correction. The references at p. 449 note 3, p. 836 note 1, p. 838 notes 1, 4, 5, 
and p. 839 notes 2, 5, below, are all to Leverett's Diary. When Wadsworth wrote 
" B.5.p.99 " (p. 832, below) and " See Coll. B.5.p.l5 " (p. 838, below), he ought to 
have written " B.5. 4to. p. 99 " and " See Coll. B.5. 4to. p. 15," as both references 
are to Leverett's Diary. 

1 Why the words "in Folio" should have been added does not appear, for so 
far as is known there was no College Book VI in Quarto. It is possible that 
Wadsworth regarded his own Diary or the Hopkins Book as College Book VI in 
Quarto, but there is nothing to indicate that he did. 



DESCRIPTION OF WADSWORTH S DIARY AND HOPKINS BOOK XXXI 

September 19, 1737, in the hand of Tutor Flynt; pages 34-60 con- 
tain entries in President Holyoke's hand extending from September 
19, 1737, to September 7, 1767; pages 60-63 contain entries in various 
hands extending from September 30, 1768, to October 4, 1779; page 
64 is blank. Later in the book are found a "Catalogue of Books;" 
"An Inventory of the Apparatus," May 20, 1779; "An Inventory of 
the Apparatus," January, 1790; and at the extreme end, the book 
having been inverted, a "List of Scholars on Mr. Hollis's Founda- 
tion," November 16, 1719, to 1736. 

The Hollis Book supplements the Corporation Records and con- 
tains matter not in the latter. 

President Wadsworth's Diary 

This contains 138 numbered pages and about 112 blank and un- 
numbered leaves. The leaves measure 5% inches in width by 7% in 
height. The back of the parchment cover is labelled: "President 
Wadsworth 1725-1736." The entries extend from 1725 to October 
1, 1736. On page 1 Wadsworth has written: "Benjamin Wads- 
worth's Book (A. Dom. 1725) relating to College affairs." There 
is no other title than this, but the volume is usually known and cited 
as "President Wadsworth's Diary." Again the word "Diary" is a 
misnomer, as the Book is really a volume of College records. It has 
apparently always been in the possession of the College. 

Hopkins Book 

This volume may be called the Hopkins Book, under which name 
it is frequently cited in the Corporation Records. The back of the 
cover is labelled "Hopkins Classical School," but the binding is not 
old. The leaves measure 5% inches in width by 7J^ in height. On 
February 28, 1726-7, the trustees of Edward Hopkins's legacy voted 
to desire " the Corporation of Harv d College to Nominate and Present 
four suitable Persons resid* at the College to receive three fourths of 
the Income of said Legacy and also five boys to be instructed gratis 
in grammar Learning in the School of Cambridge," and on March 8th 
the Corporation voted that certain students and boys were to be 
presented to the trustees. 1 The first two leaves of the Hopkins Book 
are unnumbered and blank, except that on the recto of the first leaf 

1 See p. 547, below. 



XXX11 INTRODUCTION 

is written, in the hand of President Wadsworth: "HOPKINTON 
1726 This book belongs to Harvard College, it cost five shillings & 
six pence on March. 23. 1726/7. & was bought to record y e transac- 
tions of y e Corporation with reference to Hopkinton affairs." 

The recto of the third leaf is numbered 1. Pages 1-28 contain 
entries in the hand of Wadsworth extending from February 28, 1727, 
to June 29, 1737; pages 28-67 contain entries in the hand of Holyoke 
from October 26, 1737, to July 11, 1768; pages 68-112 contain en- 
tries in various hands from September 30, 1768, to October 22, 1811; 
pages 113-201 contain entries in various hands from August, 1813, 
to August 22, 1848. Pages 109, 110, 122, 202, are blank; page 202 
is not numbered. Then come 19 unnumbered leaves containing 
entries from February 16, 1849, to September 4, 1854. At this point 
the book has been inverted, there being four unnumbered leaves at 
the end. The first leaf and the verso of the fourth leaf are blank. 
The second, third, and recto of the fourth leaf contain entries in 
Wadsworth's hand extending from October 17, 1728, to January 30, 
1735. 

The Hopkins Book supplements the Corporation Records, and 
contains matter not in the latter. 

Though many other volumes of College records are mentioned in 
the text here printed, the above are the only ones that require de- 
tailed description. 1 

Overseers 

Until recently it was customary to assert that the Board of Over- 
seers was created by the Court order of September 27, 1642. 2 A 



1 The statements made in this Introduction differ in a few trifling instances 
from the descriptions given in our Publications, xiv. 312-318. For other volumes, 
see the index under the entry "College records." 

2 Thus the 1885 Quinquennial says, under date of 1642: "Inspectores primum 
creabantur" (p. iv), and "Inspectores Creati sunt 1642" (p. x). This, or a 
similar statement, was repeated in the Quinquennials down to and including 
that of 1910 (p. 6). The more correct statement found in the 1915 Quinquennial, 
where the entry under 1642 reads "An act reorganizing the Overseers of Harvard 
College" (p. 4), was due to Mr. Gay's representations: see our Publications, 
xvii. 125, xviii. 320 note 4; Harvard Alumni Bulletin, May 26, 1915, xvii. 612- 
613. But there was still no mention in that place of the earlier act. At the 
suggestion of the present Editor, there was inserted in the 1920 Quinquennial 
under the year 1637 the entry: "An act creating the Overseers of Harvard 



OVERSEERS ORGANIZED, 1637; REORGANIZED, 1642 XXXlii 

few years ago the late Frederick L. Gay showed that this was a 
mistake. On October 28, 1636, the Court "agreed to give 400 1 
towards a schoale or colledge;" on November 15, 1637, the College 
was "ordered to bee at Newetowne;" and on November 20, 1637, 
the Court appointed the following six magistrates and six ministers 
"to take order for a colledge at Newetowne:" * 

Richard Bellingham (Treasurer) Rev. Hugh Peters 

Rev. John Cotton Rev. Thomas Shepard 

Thomas Dudley (Deputy-Governor) Israel Stoughton 

Rev. John Davenport Rev. Thomas Weld 

Roger Harlakenden Rev. John Wilson 

John Humphrey John Winthrop (Governor) 

These men constituted the original Board of Overseers, and their 
names — except that John Endecott (then Deputy-Governor) takes 
the place of Roger Harlakenden (who died in 1638) — are printed 
on the 1642 Theses. 2 At the time of the first Commencement, 
Humphrey, Peters, and Weld were in England, Stoughton was ap- 
parently on the way thither, Harlakenden was dead, while Daven- 
port had gone to New Haven in 1638. Consequently not more than 
six of the original Board were in a position to attend meetings, and 
a reorganization was felt to be imperative. This is obvious from 
the wording of the preamble to the order of September 27, 1642: 
"Whereas, by order of Co r t in the 7 th m°, 1636," — error for "9 th 
m°, 1637" — "there was appointed & named six ma trata & six eld r s 
to order the colledge at Cambridge, of w ch twelue some are removed 

College" (p. 4). A section on "The Government of the University" first ap- 
peared in the Harvard University Catalogue for 1872-73, where it was stated 
(p. 9) that the Board of Overseers was "established" by the act of 1642; and 
the same statement still appears in the same section (now called "History and 
Government" of the University) in the Harvard University Catalogue for 1924- 
25 (p. xvii). 

Apparently some years went by before the word "Overseers" became estab- 
lished. The word "inspectoribus" is found on the 1642 Theses (New Englands 
First Fruits, p. 18), and the word "Overseers" occurs in 1642 in the act of that 
year (Massachusetts Colony Records, ii. 30) and in 1643 in New Englands First 
Fruits (p. 13); but the first recorded meeting of the Board, on December 27, 
1643, was called a "meeting of the Governours of Harvard Colledge" (p. 16, 
below). 

1 Massachusetts Colony Records, i. 183, 208, 217. Cf. p. Ixvii, below. 

2 New Englands First Fruits (1643), p. 18. 



XXXIV INTRODUCTION 

out of this iurisdiction," etc. 1 The order itself specifies that the 
Board shall consist of " the Governo r & Deputy for the time being, 
& all the mag trats 2 of this iurisdiction, together with the teaching 
eld r s of the sixe next adioyning townes, that is, Cambridge, Water- 
town, Charlestowne, Boston, Roxberry, & Dorchester, & the psident 
of the colledge for the time being." 3 

It has already been stated 4 that on July 23, 1686, the President 
and Council for New England appointed Increase Mather Rector of 
the College and John Leverett and William Brattle Tutors, placing 
the government of the College under the two latter. By this arrange- 
ment, both the Board of Overseers and the Corporation fell into 
abeyance. The last recorded meeting of the Rector and Tutors was 
on April 22, 1687. Upon the overthrow of Andros on April 18, 1689, 
the Overseers and Corporation were revived, for "a meeting of y e 
Corporation" took place on June 2, 1690, 5 at which Nathaniel Gookin 
and Cotton Mather were "chosen fellows of y e s d Corporation: w ch 
choice was approved of & confirmed by y e Overseers, June 12." 6 

1 Massachusetts Colony Records, ii. 30. 

2 The word "magistrates" appears to have included the Governors, Deputy- 
Governors, and Assistants from 1630 to 1686 and from 1689 to 1692; the President, 
Deputy-President, and Councillors in 1686; and the Governors, Lieutenant- 
Governors, and Councillors from 1686 to 1689 and from 1692 to 1775. The 
Secretaries and the Treasurers were apparently not regarded as "magistrates." 

3 Id. ii. 30. The order (but not the preamble) was entered in the College 
records: see pp. 42-43, 173-174, below. The order (together with the preamble) 
was printed in the Book of the General Lawes and Libertyes, 1660, p. 18, and in 
the General Laws and Liberties, 1672, pp. 29-30. On at least one occasion the 
Court appointed as Overseers persons who were not teaching elders of the "sixe 
next adioyning townes;" for on October 18, 1654, — 

Whereas diuers elders who were ouerseers of the colledg are taken from vs, 
some by death, and others gonne for England, so that there is at this tyme great 
need of the help of some other elders to supply theire places, the Courte doth 
order, that M r John Allin, pastor of Dedham, M r John Norton, who now is 
teacher at Boston, M r Samuell Whiting, and M r Thomas Cobbett, pastor and 
teacher at Lynn, shallbe ouerseers of the colledge, to joyne with the rest of the 
ouerseers for the ordering and disposing of such things as are requisite for the 
good and welfare thereof (Massachusetts Colony Records, vol. iv. pt. i. p. 204: 
cf. our Publications, xxi. 167 note 3). 

4 See p. xxv, above. 

5 No meeting of any sort is recorded between April 22, 1687, and June 2, 1690. 
c P. 828, below. The Overseers' meeting of June 12, 1690, was not entered in 

the College records, — at least, not in those extant; but under that date Sewall 
gives a little more information: "After Lecture there is a Meeting of the Over- 



VICISSITUDES OF THE BOAKD OF OVEKSEERS, 1686-1708 XXXV 

Moreover, the four members present at the meeting of June 2 were 
Treasurer Richards, Nehemiah Hobart, John Leverett, and William 
Brattle, all of whom were apparently members of the Corporation 
previous to July 23, 1686. If the Overseers met again between June 
12, 1690, and June 27, 1692, the fact has not been recorded. 

The Charter of 1692 made no provision whatever for a board of 
Overseers or Visitors, all power being placed in the Corporation. 
The Charter of 1697 contained the following clause: 

And, in order to the preventing of irregularities, and for the more 
assurance of the well government of said College, we pray his Majesty, 
that it may be enacted, and it is hereby enacted and declared, that his 
Majesty's Governor and Commande-in-chief of this Province, and the 
Council for the time being, shall be the Visitors of the said College or 
academy, and shall have, use, and exercise a power of visitation as there 
shall be occasion for it. 1 

The Charter of 1700 contained this clause: 1160350 

And for preventing Irregilaritys in y e Governm* of the s d Colledge, 
We do hereby reserve a power of visitation thereof in our selfe our heirs 
& successors by our Governour or Comander in chief together with Our 
Council for the time being of our Province of the Massachusetts Bay 
afores d to be exercised by Our s d Governour or Comander in chief & 
Council when and so often as they shall see cause. 2 

The College was governed under the Charters of 1692, 1697, and 
1700 from June 27, 1692, to January 14, 1708, when the College 
Charter of 1650 was revived — this time for good — and the organi- 
zation established in 1642 was restored. Consequently the Board 
of Overseers again fell into abeyance from 1692 to 1708, after which 
there was no further change in its make-up until the adoption of the 
Constitution of Massachusetts in 1780. But attention should be 
called to the unsuccessful attempt made in 1727-1728 by the Rev. 
Dr. Timothy Cutler and the Rev. Samuel Myles, both graduates of 
the College and both Episcopal clergymen in Boston, to obtain seats 



seers of the Colledge: the Fellows are apointed to hold the Comencement. Mr. 
Nathaniel Gookin, and Mr. Cotton Mather were chosen Fellows, i.e. the Choice 
of the Corporation was confirmed" (Diary, i. 322). 

1 Quincy, History, i. 602; cf. Massachusetts Province Laws, i. 290. 

2 Massachusetts Province Laws, vii. 260; cf. Quincy, History, i. 610. 



XXXVI INTRODUCTION 

at the Board of Overseers on the ground of being "teaching elders," 
though this noted controversy is only indirectly alluded to in the 
records here printed. 1 

Corporation and College Charters 

The Charter of May 31, 1650, 2 specified that the Corporation 
should consist of seven members — a President, a Treasurer or 
Bursar, 3 and five Fellows, the following persons being named for 
those positions: 

Henry Dunster President 
Thomas Danforth Treasurer 

Samuel Danforth ) „ _ ,, -,.. , „ 

, ^ .~ „ I Jonathan Mitchell 

Samuel Laton > rellows < „ „ . 0x . 

„ . _ , . { Comiort Starr 4 

Samuel Mather J 

On October 23, 1C57, the General Court passed what is known as 
the Appendix to the Charter of 1650, 5 the purpose of which was to 
clarify the relations between the Corporation and the Overseers. 

On October 21, 1G72, at the session which had begun on the 8th, 
the General Court passed a new Charter. 6 This changed the name 
of the Corporation from "The President and Fellows of Harvard 
College" to "The President, Fellows, and Treasurer of Harvard 
College." The Corporation was still to consist of seven members — 



1 P. 563, below. The attempt was renewed by Cutler in 1730, but with equal 
unsuccess: see Quincy, History, i. 365-376, 560-574. 

2 The Charter of 1650 is printed on pp. 40-42, 181-183, below; Massachusetts 
Colony Records, iii. 195-196, vol. iv. pt. i. pp. 13-14; Peirce, History, Appendix, 
pp. 11-13; Quincy, History, i. 589-591; Harvard University Catalogue, 1924-25, 
pp. xix-xxi; our Publications, xxi. 395^100. The Charter of 1650 was not printed 
in the two volumes of General Laws and Liberties published in 1660 and in 
1672. 

3 The term "Bursar," though employed as a synonym for Treasurer in the 
Charter, was never used until 1874, when it was revived in a different sense. 

4 In these lists the names of the Fellows are, for convenience, given in alpha- 
betical order. 

6 It is printed in Massachusetts Colony Records, vol. iv. pt. i. p. 315; Peirce, 
History, Appendix, p. 14; Quincy, History, i. 591-592; Harvard University Cata- 
logue, 1924-25, pp. xxi-xxii. It is also found in Leverett's Diary, copied by 
himself. 

6 The Charter of 1672 is printed in Massachusetts Colony Records, vol. iv. 
pt. ii. pp. 535-537; Quincy, History, i. 592-594; our Publications, xxi. 395-402. 



COLLEGE CHARTER OF 1672 XXXvii 

a President, a Treasurer, and five Fellows, the following persons being 
named for those positions : 

Leonard Hoar President 

John Richards Treasurer 

Joseph Browne ] .,, R . . , 

Samuel Danforth \ Fellows < _. ~, . 

TT . ~ , j I I nomas Shepard 

Urian (Jakes J 

For over a century mystery has attached to this Charter, and 
probably no act connected with the College has given rise to so many 
errors or so much misapprehension. Recently, however, it has 
been submitted to an exhaustive examination, with the result that 
many of the misapprehensions have been removed. 1 At the beginning 
of 1672 the Corporation consisted apparently of President Chauncy, 
Treasurer Richards, one non-resident Fellow, Samuel Danforth, 2 
and three resident Fellows or Tutors, Alexander Nowell, Joseph 
Browne, and John Richardson. If so, then there were only four 
Fellows, instead of the five called for in the Charter of 1650. The 
death of President Chauncy on February 19, 1672, was followed by 
that of Alexander Nowell on July 13. Five days before the latter 
event Dr. Leonard Hoar arrived in Boston at the invitation of the 
Third or Old South Church, but also, apparently, with a view to the 
presidency, as he brought with him letters of recommendation for that 
office. He was duly elected, but whether by the Corporation or by 
the Overseers is not certain, between July 13 and August 1 ; he and the 
above-mentioned persons were named in the Charter which passed 
October 21; and he was inaugurated President December 10, 1672. 

The situation with which Hoar found himself confronted on his 
arrival was a difficult one. The College had sunk so low that at the 
Commencement on August 13 not a single candidate for the degree 
of A.B. presented himself. The Corporation was reduced to a 

1 See the Editor's paper on "The Harvard College Charter of 1672," in our 
Publications, xxi. 363-402. 

2 Samuel Danforth graduated in 1643; was a Tutor from about 1644 to about 
1649; was named a Fellow in the Charter of 1650; was ordained pastor of the 
church at Roxbury September 24, 1650; ceased to be a Fellow about 1654; and 
in 1668 his name again appears in the list of Fellows, though there is no record 
of his election. In the Charter of 1672 he is called "M r Samuell Danforth fellow 
of y e said Colledge," a term not applied to Oakes, Shepard, Browne, or Richard- 
son. Presumably, therefore, Danforth was a Fellow early in 1672. 



XXXVU1 INTRODUCTION 

Treasurer (Richards), a non-resident Fellow (Danforth), and two 
resident Fellows or Tutors (Browne and Richardson) ; and, in addi- 
tion, the powers granted to the Corporation by the Charter of 1650 
had been repeatedly infringed on by the Overseers. Presumably 
Hoar desired a new charter which should confirm the powers granted 
to the Corporation by the Charter of 1650 and by the laws passed 
between 1650 and 1672; and considered that the filling up of the 
Corporation to its full complement of seven was imperative. The 
Charter of 1672 accomplished both of those objects. One was 
emphasized by the Corporation in 1723, when it declared that the 
Charter of 1672 was "for the perpetuation'' of the Charter of 1650; * 
and the other by Hutchinson in 1764, when he said that the Charter 
of 1672 made "some addition to the number of the corporation." 2 
The Charter of 1650 was in force from May 31, 1650, to July 23, 

1686, when the President and Council for New England appointed 
Increase Mather Rector of the College and John Leverett and 
William Brattle Tutors, placing the government of the College under 
the two latter. 3 Only three meetings of the Rector and Tutors 
are recorded — namely, on October 1, 1686, March 8, and April 22, 

1687. Just as, after the overthrow of Andros on April 18, 1689, 
government under the Colony Charter of 1629 was assumed (on 
June 7, 1689), so too did the College authorities revive the Charter 
of 1650, though exactly when this was done is not known. At all 
events, "a meeting of y e Corporation" took place on June 2, 1690, 
at which Nathaniel Gookin and Cotton Mather were "chosen 
fellows of y e s d Corporation," and the statement is made that this 
choice was confirmed by the Overseers on June 12. 4 Other meetings 

1 Pp. 494-495, below. The passage is printed in Quincy's History, i. 551. 
Hence when Quincy, referring to the Charter of 1672, stated (i. 32) that "nor is any 
notice taken of it in those records," he overlooked a document printed by himself. 

1 History of Massachusetts, i. 171. What Hutchinson meant when he said 
that "some addition was made to the number of the corporation," was not that 
the total number of the Corporation was made more than seven by the charter, 
but merely that the charter filled the vacancies that had occurred and brought 
the Corporation up to its full complement of seven. 

* See p. xxv, above. Though the Colony Charter was vacated in 1684, yet the 
Colony was governed under it until the inauguration of Dudley as President on 
May 25, 1686. 

4 P. 828, below. The four members present on June 2, 1690, were Treasurer 
Richards, Nehemiah Hobart, John Leverett, and William Brattle, all of whom 
were apparently members of the Corporation previous to July 23, 1686. 



SUGGESTIONS ABOUT A COLLEGE CHARTER, 1691 XXXIX 

of the Corporation are recorded on June 16, August 19, 1690, April 20, 
August 24, and December 24, 1691. 1 

President Mather's efforts in 1688-1692 2 to secure a charter for 
the College failed; but while still in England he pointed out the course 
that should be followed. In a pamphlet dated London, November 16, 
1691, he wrote: 

But let me Propose, 

1. That the General Court do, without delay, agree upon a Body of 
Good Laws. . . . And as to what concerns the Upholding of Religion in 
that Countrey, there are especially Two things which may be done. 
The one is, By Laws to Encourage an Able and Faithful Ministry. The 
other, is to take care that the Colledge be Confirmed in such Hands, as 
will make it their Concern to Promote and Propagate Vertue and Learn- 
ing. It was in a special manner with respect thereunto, that I did un- 
dertake a Voyage for England above Three Years and an half since. As 
long as that Countrey lay unsettled, as to the Civil Government, I could 
not do much for the Colledge; only I prevailed with a Gentleman 3 of 
my Acquaintance, to bequeath a Legacy of Five Hundred Pounds to 
that Society. And now in this New-Charter, all Donations or Revenues 
granted to that Academy, 4 are by the King, under the Great Seal of 
England, Confirmed. I humbly proposed to some great Ministers of 
State, That a particular Charter might be granted for the Incorporating 
that School for Academical Learning. Answer was made, That it should 
be so, if I desired it: But that a better way would be, for the General 
Court of the Massachusets Colony, by a Law, to Incorporate their Col- 
ledge; and to make it an University, with as ample Priviledges as they 
should think necessary; and then transmit that Act of the General Court 
to England, for the Royal Approbation; which would undoubtedly be 
obtained. I look upon this Particular alone, to be well worth my going 
to England, and there serving half an Apprenticeship; for that no small 



1 For a list of those present at these meetings, see p. cxlviii, below. 

2 Mather left Boston in April, 1688, and did not get back until May 14, 1692: 
see Andros Tracts (Prince Society), iii. 130, 182. 

3 Robert Thorner: see pp. 832-833, below; 4 Massachusetts Historical Col- 
lections, viii. 677-678. In one place Quincy (History, i. 231) inadvertently calls 
him "Sir" Robert Thorner. 

4 Harvard College is not mentioned by name in the Province Charter, but all 
lands, tenements, hereditaments, and all other estates formerly granted to "any 
person or persons or Bodyes Politique or Corporate Townes Villages Colledges or 
Schooles," were confirmed: see our Publications, ii. 17. 



XI INTRODUCTION 

Concernment of Religion, and the Happiness of future Generations, are 
comprehended in this Matter respecting the Colledge. 1 

A Province Charter, however, dated October 7, 1691, was ob- 
tained, and under it Sir William Phips was inaugurated Governor on 
May 16, 1692. On May 27 it was — 

Ordered. That the Rev d M r Increase Mather be desired, and is 
hereby impowred to continue his care of Harvard Colledge in Cambridge, 
as Rector 2 thereof until further Order, and to give direction about the 
comencement now drawing on, and to manage the same as formerly. 

William Phips 3 

Very soon thereafter the suggestion made to Mather by "some great 
Ministers of State " was adopted, and the College was incorporated 
by the General Court by the Charter of June 27, 1692. Thereupon 
ensued nearly sixteen years of uncertainty as regards the College, 
during which no fewer than five charters were proposed, of which one 
(1696) was rejected by the College, another (1699) was vetoed by 
Governor Bellomont, while the three (1692, 1697, 1700) that were 
accepted by the College did not, in spite of the prognostication of 
certain "great Ministers of State," obtain the royal approbation 
but were all disallowed by the Privy Council. 
The Charter of June 27, 1692, 4 specified that the Corporation 

1 A Brief Account concerning Several of the Agents of New-England, their 
Negotiation at the Court of England, etc., in Andros Tracts, ii. 295-296. Cf. 
iii. 138-139, 142. 

2 The title "Rector" was first used July 23, 1686, and, as already stated 
(p. xxvi note 1, above), was doubtless chosen to distinguish the head of the College 
from the head of the civil government. It may be doubted whether the title 
was in actual use after the overthrow of Andros on April 18, 1689. As stated in 
the text (p. xxxiv, above), the Corporation and Overseers were revived, and meet- 
ings of the former were held from June 2, 1690, to December 24, 1691. As 
Mather was then in England, of course he was not present at those meetings, 
nor is he mentioned in any of them; but if he had been, presumably he would 
have been called "President." While in England he was called both "Rector" 
and "President:" see Andros Tracts, ii. 7, 17, iii. 139 note, 146 note. 

3 Council Records, ii. 177. 

* It is printed on pp. 335-338, below; Massachusetts Province Laws, i. 38-39; 
Quincy, History, i. 594-596. The original draught is in Massachusetts Archives, 
Iviii. 140-142. It was not printed in the Acts and Laws of Their Majesties 
Province of the Massachusets-Bay, published in 1692. The 1920 Quinquennial, 
following previous editions, states that the Charter "was neither approved by 
the King nor accepted by the College" (p. 13). The former assertion is correct; 
the latter, incorrect. 



COLLEGE CHARTER OF 1692 xli 

should consist of ten members — a President, a Treasurer, and eight 
Fellows, the following persons 1 being named for those positions: 

Increase Mather President 
John Richards Treasurer 



James Allen 
William Brattle 
Nathaniel Gookin 
Nehemiah Hobart 2 



Fellows 



John Leverett 
Cotton Mather 
Nehemiah Walter 
Samuel Willard 



Under the Charter of 1692 the Corporation held meetings from 
July 26, 1692, to July 6, 1696, during which time the following 
changes in membership took place: Nehemiah Hobart declined his 
appointment as Fellow and Charles Morton was elected in his place 
July 26, 1692; Nathaniel Gookin died in August, 1692, 3 his place as 

This charter apparently passed with little discussion. Sewall does not mention 
it in his Diary; it is not alluded to in the Council Records; and the only reference 
to it in the Court Records (vi. 234) is as follows, under date of June 27, 1692: 

A Bill for incorporating Harvard Colledge in Cambridge sent up, and past by 
the representatives, having been read on several Day's, and now again read with 
the Amendments, is Ordered to be engrost, and passed into an Act 

And is Consented unto 

William Phips 

1 In a petition undated, but assigned by the Rev. Thomas Prince to June 1, 
1688, Increase Mather said: 

At the time when the Civil Government was changed, the Colledge was (nor 
is it that wee know of, as yet put into other hands) under the Inspection of 
Increase Mather as President, John Sherman, Nehemiah Hubbard, John Cotton, 
John Leverett, William Brattle, as Fellows, and John Richards as Treasurer 
(Andros Tracts, iii. 138 note). 

This statement is correct, with the exception of John Sherman, who had 
died August 8, 1685. Nathaniel Gookin and Cotton Mather were elected Fellows 
on June 2, 1690. Hence the persons named in the Charter of 1692 were those 
who were members of the Corporation in 1691 with the addition of James Allen, 
Nehemiah Walter, and Samuel Willard. Why the number of Fellows was in- 
creased from five to eight does not appear. Two of the eight Fellows — John 
Leverett and William Brattle — had been Tutors since 1685 and continued to be 
Tutors until 1697. 

2 "Hobart" and "Hubbard" are variants of the same name, and both forms 
are found in the records here printed and elsewhere. In Mather's petition, quoted 
in the previous note, the form is "Hubbard." A footnote on that name reads: 
"The person intended was undoubtedly William Hubbard " (Mather Papers, p. 1 14; 
repeated in Andros Tracts, iii. 139 note). The person intended was not William 
Hubbard, who was never a Fellow at any time, but Nehemiah Hobart. 

3 "The ancient record says, 'Mr. Nathanial Gookin, our pastor, departed this 



xlii INTRODUCTION 

Fellow not being filled; and John Richards resigned as Treasurer on 
April 19, 1G93, and was succeeded on May 8 by Thomas Brattle. 

Governor Phips having left Boston in 1694, Lieutenant-Governor 
Stoughton became Acting Governor. News of the disallowance of 
the Charter of 1692 reached Boston on July 12, 1696. 1 The General 
Court had been prorogued on June 17 to September 11, and the 
draught of a new charter was almost immediately introduced. On 
October 12, Stoughton "desired & appointed'' those who were 
members of the Corporation under the Charter of 1692 to retain 
their respective positions "untill his Maj ties further pleasure shall 
be known, or a legall settlement of said Colledge shall be obtained." 2 
Under this appointment the Corporation met on November 9, 1696, 
but not again. 3 The Charter of 1696 was voted and approved on 
December 17, 4 but was rejected by the Corporation. In a document 



life 7 day of August 1692, being the Sabbath day at night*" (L. R. Paige, History 
of Cambridge, pp. 279, 565). But Sewall heard "the amazing News of the 
Revd. Mr. Nathan 1 Gookin's being dead" on August 15, and attended his 
funeral on the 16th (Diary, i. 363). 

1 Sewall, Diary, i. 429; Council Records, ii. 403. On March 29, 1695, the 
Lords of Trade and Plantations agreed to recommend that "the Act for in- 
corporating Harvard College be disallowed, and that the Attorney-General 
prepare a new clause" to it; on June 4, 1695, the Lords agreed to recommend 
that the Act be repealed, "since it reserves no power to the King to appoint 
a visitor, which power should be reserved to the King and to the Governor;" 
and on August 22, 1695, the Act was disallowed by the Privy Council, the reasons 
being given in a letter dated December 26: see Calendar of State Papers, America 
and West Indies, 1693-1696, pp. 452, 497^98; Acts of the Privy Council, Colonial 
Series, 1680-1720, p. 841; Province Laws, i. 39 note. 

2 P. 355, below. On the same day (October 12) Sewall wrote: 

L* Governour goes to Cambridge, Mr. Secretary, Major Wally and I goe to 
Dorchester and wait on his Honour from thence; Mr. Cook, Mr. Hutchinson, 
Foster, Russel, Lynde there: Mr. Williams made an Oration (M r Pemberton 
should have done it but was prevented by his fathers death). L* Gov r com- 
plemented the Pressedent &c, for all the respect to him, acknowldg'd his obliga- 
tion and promis'd his Interposition for them as became such an Alumnus to 
such an Alma Mater: directed and desired the Presd* and fellows to go on; 
directed and enjoined the students to obedience (Diary, i. 435). 

3 Pp. 355-356, below. For a list of those present at the meetings from July 26, 
1692, to November 9, 1696, see p. cxlix, below. 

4 The Charter of 1696 was read or debated on September 28, October 2, 
November 27, 30, December 10, 14, 15, 16, and 17, on which day it was voted 
and approved. (Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 1696-1697, 
pp. 158, 223, 231, 242, 254-255; Court Records, vi. 499, 501, 503.) The draught 



COLLEGE CHARTER OF 1696 REJECTED BY THE CORPORATION xliii 

undated, but presumably drawn up before December 17, four mem- 
bers wrote: 

The Act for Incorporating the Colledge, allows no president, except 
Resident, (and so the Colledge rendred Incapable of Action,) before the 
Act is confirmed. 

Wee observe, that Four Thousand pounds revenue, bee Reduced unto 
Two; and know not what Advantage of it. Some Colledges in Oxford 
have Thirty Thousand. 

No Corporation-Meeting is therein to bee had on any occasion, tho' 
never so small, without Advice given to Sixteen, whereof some are far 
distant; & without the presence of Ten, and the Consent of Nine. 

There can be no execution of any Statutes, or Orders, without the En- 
cumbrance afores d . They that know what it is, to Govern the Colledge, 
are of Opinion, that these things will render it Impossible. 



of this Charter which is in Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 157-160, was printed 
by Quincy (History, i. 597-599), but without indication that changes were made 
in it. The draught originally stated "That the said Harvard Colledge . . . shall 
henceforth be a Corporation consisting of Eighteen Persons, That is to say, a 
President, Sixteen Fellows and a Treasurer, And that 

shall be the first President, Charles Morton, I shall be 

the Sixteen Fellows and the Treasurer all of them Inhab- 

itants in said Province, and the first Eighteen persons whereof the said Cor- 
poration shall consist." Later, the word "Eighteen" was altered to "Sixteen," 
and the word "Sixteen" was altered to "Fourteen." The names of the members 
of the Corporation, except that of Morton, were never inserted in the draught, 
but pasted to the last (fourth) page of the draught is a slip of paper containing 
the following: 

M r Incr: Mather Presid* M r Cotton Mather 

M r Cha: Morton, Vice P. M r John Leverett Angier 

M r Mich a Wigglesworth M r W* Brattle White 

M r James Allen M r Neh: Walter 

M r Sam: Torrey M r Paul Dudley 

M r Sam: Willard M r Benj. Wadsworth 

M r Neh: Hobart M r Thomas Brattle Treasur r 

M r Pe: Thacher Voted and approved of 

M r Jn° Danforth D ec r 17 th 

It will be observed that Morton is called "Vice P.," yet in the draught itself 
Morton's name is inserted as one of the Fellows and there is no provision for a 
Vice President. Quincy omits the names of Angier and White, who presumably 
would have been Fellows had the Corporation consisted, as originally intended, 
of sixteen Fellows. It is impossible to tell precisely what was intended in this 
draught, so that, though the above names (except those of Angier and White) are 
inserted in the list on pp Ixiv-lxvi, below, caution should be exercised. 



xliv INTRODUCTION 

Wee see a Diminution of Respect unto the president, in y° Former 
Charter, as to Immunity of Servants. 

The Visitation, is such as makes it extremely probable, that the Act 
will not only miss of y e Royal Approbation, but also give Offence by its 
Variation fro the Direction of the Lords of y e Council: Which wee in- 
stance, not from o r Dislike of the Thing, but from o r Concern, to have 
no part in any thing, that may Renew & prolong y e unsettlement of y e 
Colledge. 

For such causes, wee humbly pray to be excused, from having o r 
Names Inserted in the Act. 

Increase Mather 
James Allen 
Sam l Willard 
Cotton Mather 1 

As this protest was unavailing, on January 6, 1697, the same four 
members together with three other members — John Leverett, 
William Brattle, and Nehemiah Walter — addressed the following 
letter to Stoughton: 

Hon ble S B 

Due Acknowledgm* 9 of yo r resp ct to the College and to us psonally 
being premised, We have thot it our duty to acquaint yo r Hon r with 
what has bin very gravaminous unto us. 

We can't but deeply resent the unkindnesses and disrespect, w ch have 
bin cast upon us by the Council in the affair relating to that Society; 
Wee must needs be Sensible, we have bin treated as if we were Children 
rather then men capable to govern A College, for thus it has bin: 

Altho the King has very graciously invited us to Renew our late 
Charter (w ch is a kindness that no other King did, or w d have shown to a 
New-England Academy) onely reserving to his Maj ty and to his Gov r A 
Power of Visitation. And after the Deputys in the Gen 1 Court Assem- 
bled had desired Our Advice in the Matter, And passed A Bill accord- 
ingly, The Council w th out ever So much as Consulting us, in whose 
hands the Governm* of the College was entrusted by the former Generall 



1 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 161. Sewall writes: "About Dec r 18, Mr. 
Mather, Allen, Willard, C. Mather give in a paper subscribed by them, shewing 
their dislike of our draught for the Colledge Charter, and desiring that their 
Names might not be entered therein. One chief reason was their apointing the 
Gov r and Council for Visitor" (Diary, i. 441). The paper printed in the text, 
though without date, is evidently the one mentioned by Sewall. It is wholly in 
the hand of Cotton Mather, except the signatures, which are autograph. 



COLLEGE CHARTER OF 1696 REJECTED BY THE CORPORATION xlv 

Assembly (as well as Since by yo r Hon r ) Negativ'd What the Representa- 
tives of the Province had consented unto; but we were not thot worthy 
to have the knowledge of it for Several moneths, but were made believe, 
it was onely A Demurr in order to Some Emendations. 

Som of us Signify'd to the Council, that if any Essential Alterations 
were made, in what had been consented unto by the Deputies, We for 
o r p ts sh d not be any Longer concerned in, or related to that Society. 
Nevertheless we were Willing y* there sh d be necessary Explications, of 
any Article in the Charter, if that might Suffice. 

After this the Council conclude on another Draught in Substance 
varying from the former, and in w ch Old Priviledges possess'd by the 
College these 47 Years were taken from it. Particularly, Neither the 
Presid* nor Corporation were allow'd those Serv ts w th Imunities, w ch 
they ever had Enjoy'd. Nor were their Estates under their own Man- 
agem* free from Ordinary Taxes, tho in all other Colleges, and in This 
untill now, it has bin So. New Names of Severall Worthy psons at a 
remote distance from the College were put into this Draught, w th out 
ever so much as enquiring Whither Wee c d be conveniently joyn'd with 
them, and in the Order of placing those Names, A peculiar disrespect 
put upon Some of us. And according to this Draught the Presid* was 
Obliged to Write 15 Letters every Corporation meeting, and was made 
as Insignificant a Member of the Corporation, as the most Iun r Fellow 
therein, not being allow'd So much as A casting Vote; besides Some 
Other things, w ch rendred the Governm* of the College Impracticable 
and Impossible to us. Nor c Id We prevaile not to be Obliged unto Paper- 
Votes onely, altho that one thing w ld have made us ridiculous both at 
Court, and in all other Universities. Thus if it had not bin for yo r 
Hon r , We must, after we had Govern'd the College for many years, have 
had fescues given to us to direct us how to manage every Trifle. 

And w ch is yet a greater Consideration, Notw th standing the Ministers 
of state When writing in the Kings Name expressly require, That A 
power of Visitation be reserv'd to his Maj ty (And not to the Gov r onely) 
the Council in this Draught have wholy Excluded his Maj ty , and have 
reserved that Power of Visitation onely to the Gov r & themselves. Sh d 
we act upon Such a Charter, We veryly beleive the King w d (We are 
sure he w d have just cause to) be Offended at us. 

Yet further, Wee cannot but have A sad resentm* of it, That the 
Gentlmen of yo r Hon rs Council have not in any One Particular that 
Wee know of comply'd w th our desire in altering what Wee have Ob- 
jected ag st tho in things w ch themselves have acknowledged to be rea- 
sonable: To Instance onely in that of Obliging the Presid* to reside at the 



Xlvi INTRODUCTION 

College, before the Charter is Confirm'd. And it is said, that Some of 
them, when they saw four of us had given it under Our hands l that our 
Names sh d not be inserted in Such A Charter, were the more desirous to 
have it Voted imediately. 

What advantage any of 'em c d ppose to the publick Interest, or to 
themselves, or what reputation it wilbe to them thro-out the Countrey, 
or in other Lands, wdien the report of it shal there be heard, that they 
have discourag'd us from being any further concern'd in the College, 
We can't Divine. 

As much as we have bin contemned, we must needs kno, that the 
Countrey does not So much abound with psons fit to Instruct and Govern 
the Stud ts , as that when we are all of us at once by Such unkind treatm* 
driven away, A Sufficient Number w th out us may be found to undertake 
it, or if they sh d , others wilbe discouraged by our Example, unto w ch 
Wee have bin thus constrained, or if so nothing will pass in England, 
when We have, (as for our Own Vindication it is necessary that we sh d ) 
given an Ace* to the Ministers there of the reasons why we have declined 
the Service of the College 

We are not so uncharitable as to think that there is in the Maj r p* of 
the Council (WTio we are Satisfy'd, are both y e College's and our Friends) 
A design to ruine it — But we must Say, That Some late actings have A 
direct Tendency to the Dissolution and Desolation of that happy Nurs- 
ery, and are like Speedily to issue therein. 

To Conclude, Yo r Hon r (into whose hands as the Kings representa- 
tive the College is fallen) was pleased to desire us 2 to act as Presid* & 
Fellows According to the R s of our Late Charter untill his Maj ty ' s 
Pleasure shall be further known, this We have bin willing to do. But the 
Treatm* w ch we have had this Last session of the Gen 1 Court, has laid 
Invincible Obstacles in o r way, that We can't accept of anything more. 

And We do therefore now 3 Signify to yo r Hon r , That in Case the 
Draught agreed unto Dec r 17 th Shalbe adher'd unto & Enacted, Wee 
Shall none of us be concern'd in the Governm* of the College, & this We 
write not inconsiderately, but as that w ch is our fix'd Resolution, from 
w ch no pswations can remove us. 

As for yourself S r We have no ground of Complaint, But We own you 
as the Patron of that Society, in the pmoting the Welfare whereof, Som 
of us have Spent a gr* p* of o r time for many years past. It has pleased 
the Lord of his free grace (Wee humbly bless his Name) to cause the 



1 See pp. xliii-xliv, above. 

2 See Stoughton's order of October 12, 1696, p. xlii, above. 
* Altered from "now therefore." 






COLLEGE CHARTER OF 1697 



xlvii 



Work there to psper in our dispised hands. We shall pray, That it may 
psper more under the Conduct of o r Success™, if any Such there Shalbe. 
Wherefore we have no more to add, but With iterated thanks, subscribe 
ourselves 

Hon ble S r 

Yo r humble Serv ts 
Jan** 6° 1696/7. J-M, J-A, S-W, C-M, 

L* Gov r Stoughton. J-L, W-B, N-W, 1 

On June 4, 1697, a new Charter was passed. 2 This specified that 
the Corporation should consist of seventeen members — a President, 
a Vice President, a Treasurer, and fourteen Fellows, the following 
persons being named for those positions : 

Increase Mather President 
Charles Morton Vice President 
Thomas Brattle Treasurer 



James Allen 
William Brattle 
John Danforth 
Paul Dudley 
Nehemiah Hobart 
John Leverett 
Cotton Mather 



Fellows 



Peter Thacher 
Samuel Torrey 
Benjamin Wadsworth 
Nehemiah Walter 
John White 
Michael Wigglesworth 
Samuel Willard 3 



1 Colman Papers, in Massachusetts Historical Society. This letter, including 
the initials at the end, is wholly in the hand of Leverett. 

2 The steps leading to the adoption of this Charter were as follows. On Decem- 
ber 19, 1696, the General Court was prorogued to March 17, 1697, and on March 
19 "The Bill for Incorporating Harvard College in Cambridge left unperfected, 
At the last Session was now read, and Debated," and was again read and debated 
on March 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31, on which day the Court was dissolved. 
The new Court met May 26, the Charter was read May 29, 31, June 1, 2, and was 
passed into an Act on June 4. (Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 
1696-1697, pp. 402, 406, 494, 495; Court Records, vi. 510, 514, 520, 526, 528.) 

The Charter of 1697 is printed in Massachusetts Province Laws, i. 288-290; 
Quincy, History, i. 599-602. The original draught is in Massachusetts Archives, 
Iviii. 162-167. It was not printed in the Acts and Laws of His Majesties Province 
of the Massachusets-Bay, 1697. 

3 It will be observed that all the Fellows under this Charter were non-resident. 
Thus Tutors were excluded from the Corporation, though under previous charters 
at least two and sometimes more Tutors had been members of the Corporation. 
It will also be observed that among the Fellows were three who were not clergy- 
men — Paul Dudley, John Leverett (who had recently ceased to be a Tutor), and 
John White. Under the Charter of 1692 all the Fellows had been clergymen 
except the two Tutors, John Leverett and William Brattle. 



xlviii INTRODUCTION 

Under this Charter the Corporation met from July 13, 1697, to 
December 5, 1G98, during which time the only change that occurred 
in its membership was the death of Vice President Morton on 
April 11, 1698. 1 

News of the disallowance of the Charter of 1697 reached Boston 
on April 26, 1699. 2 The General Court, not then in session, met on 
May 31, and in his speech on June 2 Governor Bellomont said: 

I would very gladly promote a Charter of Incorporation for your Col- 
ledge at Cambridge, and will heartily joine with you in addressing his 
Majesty for his Royal Grant of such Priviledges and Franchises as his 
Maj ty in his Goodness shall think fit. Tis a very great Advantage you 



1 For a list of those present at the meetings, see p. cl, below. On November 
23, 1698, the Corporation presented the following petition (Massachusetts 
Archives, lviii. 179): 

To the Honourable y e Lieu* Govern 1 ", Council, & Representatives, in Gen 11 
Court Assembled. . . . 

In as much as the Condition of Harvard Colledge, doth render it very neces- 
sary, that some further provision be made for y e wellfare thereof; It is humbly 
proposed unto this Hon ble Assembly, that in case y e Corporation of the said 
Colledge can prevail with any fit person to accept of the place of a Vice President, 
& remove unto y e Colledge, & there perform y e work usually attended by Presi- 
dents resident at y e Colledge, under y e continuall assistance & Countenance of 
the Rev d President (y e continuance of whose relation to the Colledge is on all 
Acco ts needfull) & in his absence, to have the full power of the President; This 
Honoured Court would please to order for such a Vice President such encourage- 
ment, as may be judged agreeable, while he shall devote himself unto a Service 
of so much Importance. 

James Allen 

Boston 23. Novemb' In the name ^ with the Consent 

.ggo of the Corporation 

This was read and debated on November 28 and December 1 (Calendar of State 
Papers, America and West Indies, 1G97-1698, p. 565; Court Records, vi. 612, 
616; Massachusetts Province Laws, vii. 608-610), but apparently no further 
action was taken. 

2 Sewall, Diary, i. 495; Council Records, iii. 16. On November 24, 1698, the 
Council of Trade and Plantations wrote to the Lords Justices of England: "An 
Act to incorporate Harvard College was formerly repealed because no power 
was reserved to the King to appoint visitors, and it was intimated that the Act 
would be passed if a clause were added giving a power of visitation to the King 
and to the Governor of the Province. Now the present Act to incorporate the 
College vests the power of visitation in the Governor and Council, and we there- 
fore recommend that it be repealed " (Calendar of State Papers, America and West 
Indies, 1697-1698, p. 563). Accordingly, on the same day the Act was disallowed 
by the Privy Council (Acts of the Privy Council, Colonial, 1680-1720, pp. 743-744). 



COLLEGE CHARTER OF 1699 VETOED BY BELLOMONT 



xlix 



have above the other Provinces that your Youth are not put to travail 
for Learning, but have the Muses at their Doors. Besides, that Colledge 
will always be a Nursery to Afford you a Supply of able Ministers for 
the Cure of Souls Therefore tis pity the King's Royal Charter should 
not be Sollicited for out of hand. 1 

Accordingly, a Charter was agreed to on July 13, 1699, 2 but on 
the 18th Governor Bellomont refused his consent to it for the following 
reasons : 



1 Court Records, vii. 5-6. 

2 The Charter of 1699 is printed by Quincy, History, i. 602-607, from the 
original draught in Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 188-190. The names of 
Samuel Angier and of Samuel Torrey are in one place wrongly given by Quincy 
(History, i. 603) as "John Angier" and "Samuel Young." As originally 
draughted, the Corporation was to consist of seventeen members — a President, 
a Vice President, a Treasurer, and fourteen Fellows, the following persons being 
named for those positions: 

Increase Mather President 
Samuel Willard Vice President 
Thomas Brattle Treasurer 



James Allen 
Samuel Angier 
William Brattle 
John Danf orth 
Nehemiah Hobart 
John Leverett 
Cotton Mather 



Fellows 



Nicholas Noyes 
Peter Thacher 
Samuel Torrey 
Benjamin Wadsworth 
Nehemiah Walter 
John White 
l Michael Wigglesworth 



As thus draughted, the bill passed the House on July 8; was read in Council 
July 11; was read again in Council July 12 and committed to a committee of the 
whole board; and was amended and passed July 13. By the amendments agreed 
to on July 13 the Treasurer was left out of the Corporation, which was to consist 
of a President, a Vice President, and fifteen Fellows. (Court Records, vii. 31-33, 
37-39; Calendar of State Papers, America and W T est Indies, 1699, pp. 340, 350; 
Massachusetts Province Laws, i. 308.) Of the fifteen Fellows, thirteen are named 
in the Charter, and in addition "the two senior Tutors residing at the College 
for the time being:" these were Ebenezer Pemberton and Jabez Fitch (whose 
names are here printed in italics). The persons named are as follows: 
Increase Mather President 
Samuel Willard Vice President 
Isaac Addington 



James Allen 
William Brattle 
Elisha Cooke 
John Danf orth 
Jabez Fitch 
Nehemiah Hobart 
Cotton Mather 



Fellows 



Ebenezer Pemberton 
Samuel Sewall 
William Stoughton 
Samuel Torrey 
Nehemiah Walter 
Michael Wigglesworth 
Wait Winthrop 



1 INTRODUCTION 

The Bill for Incorporating Harvard Colledge at Cambridge was read, 
and his Ex cy Objected to one Clause or paragraph therein, That none 
should be President, Vice President, or a Fellow of s d Corporation but 
such as should Declare themselves, and Continue to be, as to their per- 
swasion in Matters of Religion, such as are known by the Name of Con- 
gregational, or Presbyterian 

And the Question being put to the Board, Whether they could consent 
to pass the s d Bill, leaving out that Paragraph? 

It was carried in the Negative 

Then William Stoughton, Elisha Cooke, Samuel Sewall Esq™ and the 
Secretary were Nominated, and Appointed to Acquaint the House of 
Representatives that his Excellency could not Consent to the s d Bill 
with the Aforesaid Clause therein; And that he rather Advised to Ad- 
dress his Majesty for a Royal Charter of Incorporation. 1 

The Court w r as prorogued on July 20, but on the 25th the following 
proceedings took place in Council : 

Whereas the Assembly at the last Session of the General Court, pro- 
posed to suspend their proceedings in the affair referring to the settle- 
ment of the Colledge until the next Session of said Court, and made their 
humble application unto his Excellency, that he would please in the 
mean time to continue the Government and direction of the Colledge 
with the Gentlemen of late a Corporation for the same, and that the 
Estate of the Colledge may be improved according to the rules and orders 
lately in force for the Government of the students and management of 
the Estate aforesaid, that those who have the care and Institution of the 
students may be suitably supported and encouraged 

Advised. That his Excell cy do accordingly continue the Government 
and direction of the Colledge with the Gent n of the said late Corporation, 
to have and exercise the same until further order. 2 

This was the "temporary settlement " the exact nature of which 
was unknown to Quincy, and under which the Corporation met on 
August 7, November 6, 1699, and May 6, 1700. 3 



1 Court Records, vii. 37-38. 

2 Council Records, iii. 48; Massachusetts Province Laws, vii. 228. Cf. Sewall, 
Diary, i. 500. 

1 There is no record of a Corporation meeting between December 5, 1698, and 
August 7, 1099. For a list of those present at the meetings from July 13, 1697, 
to May 6, 1700, see p. cl, below. 

In a letter to Isaac Addington dated Cambridge, August 10 (Thursday), 1699, 
John Leverett wrote: 



TEMPORARY SETTLEMENT OF JULY 25, 1699 H 

Between July 20, 1699, and May 29, 1700, only one session of the 
General Court was held — namely, from March 13 to March 23, 1700. 
On March 23 — 



... I have not been at Boston since my returne, . . . But I did not Intend 
to trouble you with this Sort of Intelligence. Nor Indeed have I any thing 
proper to Send to your hono r unless it be A Short Ace* of An Ellection made 
at Colledge the last munday. As Soon as I got home I was Informed that the 
R. Reverend President held a Corporation at the Colledge the 7 th Instant that 
the s d Corporation after the publication of the New Settlem* Made Choice of 
M r fflint to be one of the Tuto r s at Colledge they have taken off from M r Pem- 
bertons Salary 10*p Ann and have Curtailed and dock'd M r flitch of £15. and 
of a Classis with w ch they have patcht up A pension for a third ffellow. I have 
not the late Act for Incorporating y e Colledge At hand nor have I Seen the new 
Temporary Settlem* But I pceive that all the Members of the late Corporation 
were not notified to be at the Meeting. I can't say how legall these late pro- 
ceedings are, but I must say It is wonderfull that An Establishm* for So Short 
a time as till Octob r next should be made use of So Soon as to Introduce an un- 
necessary Addition to that Society. (Copied from the original letter in the 
Colman Papers in the Massachusetts Historical Society.) 

Quincy, remarking that "there is no account" of the temporary settlement, 
"either in the College records, or in those of the General Court," quotes the 
above letter and makes the following comment: 

The language of Leverett indicates, that he was not a member of the Cor- 
poration under this new settlement; which is also to be gathered not only from 
his exclusion from the former bill, but also from his name not appearing on the 
records of the Corporation among those present at that meeting (History, i. 103- 
104,500-501). 

Leverett's language does not justify the conclusions drawn from it by Quincy. 
By "the late Corporation," Leverett clearly meant the Corporation under the 
Charter of 1697 and not, as Quincy appears to think, the Corporation as con- 
stituted under the proposed Charter of 1699. Nor is there a word in Leverett's 
letter to indicate either that he himself was not summoned to the meeting of 
August 7 or that he did not regard himself as then a member of the Corporation. 
The fact that he was not present on August 7 is adequately accounted for by 
his absence from Cambridge at that time. By "so short a time as October 
next," Leverett referred to the next meeting of the Legislature, which had been 
prorogued on July 20 to October 11. Leverett wrote in a fit of pique, and admits 
that he had not "seen the new temporary settlement" — a settlement prac- 
tically identical with the one made by Stoughton on October 12, 1696 (see p. xlii, 
above). That the settlement of July 25, 1699, escaped Quincy was due to the 
fact that copies of the Council Records for that year were not at the State House 
in his day. 

An examination of those present at the meetings from July 13, 1697, to 
May 6, 1700 (see p. cl, below), shows that Paul Dudley did not attend a 
single meeting; that the only meeting at which Michael Wigglesworth was 
present was that of August 7, 1699; that Benjamin Wadsworth and John White, 



lii INTRODUCTION 

M r Levcrett, M r White and M r Phips Members of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, attended on his Excellency with a Message from that 
house, praying his Lordship that the Care, and Government of the Col- 
ledge may be Continued in the Hands of the late Corporation as at 
present until other provision be made, which Motion was Approved by 
the Board. 1 

The new Court met on May 29, 1700, and in his speech on May 30 
Governor Bellomont said: 

What I proposed last May Session for the Advantage of the Province 
in relation to the Settlement of the Colledge, and fortifying this Harbour 
was so Coldly entertained by the Assembly that I am almost Discouraged 
from Renewing my Advice on those Heads, Yet my Zeal for the Public 
Service will not Suffer me to pass over in Silence those two Material 
Points. The Settlement of the Colledge will best be Obtained, in my 
Opinion, by Addressing the King for his Royal Charter of Priviledges. 2 

As the Charters of 1692 and 1697 had been disallowed by the Privy 
Council, Bellomont's suggestion of a draught of a royal charter, 
though it had been rejected in 1699, was acted on; and on July 12, 
1 700, a Charter 3 — the fifth to be proposed and the third to be 



both of whom were present on August 7, 1699, were not Fellows under the pro- 
posed Charter of 1699 (as amended); and that Leverett himself, who also was 
not a Fellow under the proposed Charter of 1699 (as amended), attended the 
meeting of May 6, 1700. 

In the above letter Leverett speaks of the election on August 7, 1699, of a 
third Tutor (Henry Flynt) as "an unnecessary addition." Except for brief 
periods previous to about 1676 there had apparently never been more than 
two Tutors until 1699. Yet there is a curious entry on November 15, 1697, when 
it was stated that "M r Iohn White, m r Ebenezer Pemberton and m r Iabez Fitch 
were chosen to be Tuto rs ," though at the very next meeting on March 3, 1698, 
Pemberton and Fitch were called "the present Tutors" (pp. 357, 358, below). 
Now John White was a Fellow under the Charter of 1697 and was present at the 
meeting of November 15, 1697, and there is no further allusion to him as a Tutor. 
It would seem as if the inclusion of his name was a clerical error. At all events, 
there were only two Tutors between 1685 and 1699. 

1 Court Records, vii. 64. 

* Court Records, vii. 73-74. 

1 The Charter of 1700 is printed in Massachusetts Province Laws, vii. 257-260; 
Quincy, History, i. 607-610. The original draught is in Massachusetts Archives, 
lviii. 201-208. For the steps leading to its adoption, see Calendar of State 
Papers, America and West Indies, 1700, pp. 293, 329, 387, 388, 399, 409, 412, 
414, 418-419, 420; Massachusetts Province Laws, vii. 245, 252-253, 636, 642, 
643, 644, 651, 652; Court Records, vii. 127, 129, 130, 133, 134, 135. 

It is important to bear in mind that, unlike the Charters of 1692 and 1697 



COLLEGE CHARTER OF 1700 



liii 



adopted within eight years — was agreed to. This specified that the 
Corporation should consist of seventeen members — a President, a 
Vice President, and fifteen Fellows, the following persons being 
named for those positions: 

Increase Mather President 
Samuel Willard Vice President 



James Allen 
Samuel Angier 
John Danforth 
Jabez Fitch 
Henry Flynt 
Henry Gibbs 
Nehemiah Hobart 
Cotton Mather 



Fellows 



Jonathan Pierpont 
Peter Thacher 
Samuel Torrey 
Benjamin Wadsworth 
Nehemiah Walter 
John White 
Michael Wigglesworth 



Of the fifteen Fellows, only thirteen are named in the Charter itself, 
and in addition " the two senior Tutors resident at the said College 
for the time being" — namely, Jabez Fitch and Henry Flynt, whose 
names in the above list are printed in italics. 

Under this Charter 2 meetings of the Corporation were held from 



the Charter of 1700 was not a regular Act of incorporation, but merely a draught 
of a charter that, it was hoped, would be granted by the King. This is clearly 
indicated by the preamble, which reads: "Draught of a Charter of Incorporation 
for Harvard Colledge at Cambridge in New-England, agreed by the Council 
and House of Representatives of his Maj tie ' s Province of the Massachusetts Bay, 
to be humbly Sollicited for to his Maj'ty" (Province Laws, vii. 257). Hence in 
the order of the King's Council of June 12, 1701, confirming the Acts passed at 
the May session, 1700, there is naturally no mention of this Charter: see Massa- 
chusetts Archives, xx. 47-48, lxvii. 226-227, lxx. 535-536. 

1 The name is so printed by Quincy, but in all the original documents it 
appears as "Nehemiah Hubbard." See p. xli note 2, above. 

2 For a list of those present at these meetings, see p. cli, below. 

Though the Charter of 1700 certainly never received the royal assent, yet 
exactly what happened to it in England has never been ascertained. On June 
4, 1700, the Council resolved that an address be sent to the King about the 
French, and this was agreed to by the House. On June 11 "the Houses agreed 
that application should be made unto His Majesty by way of Address for the 
settlement of the College, and be inserted in the Address agreed to be made about 
the encroachments of the French." On June 13 the address was read, and was 
adopted on the 14th. On June 15 the Court resolved that an address to Bello- 
mont be prepared; on June 20 the draught of such an address was presented, this 
was taken up in Council on June 21, was concurred in by the House with differ- 
ences on June 22, on June 26 a committee about the address was appointed by 



liv INTRODUCTION 

August 5, 1700, to October 28, 1707, during which time the following 
changes in membership took place: President Mather resigned Sep- 
tember 6, 1701; Jabez Fitch removed to Ipswich in 1703; Cotton 
Mather and Xehemiah Walter were regarded as having "abdicated" 
in 1703; ! Michael Wigglesworth died June 10, 1705; Samuel Torrey 

the Council, the draught of the address was read in Council July 6 and was under 
debate in the House until July 9, when it was adopted, though the address itself 
is dated July 12. On July 15 Bellomont wrote to the Council of Trade and 
Plantations about the Charter, and on the 16th to Secretary Popple, expressing 
the hope that he "will favour and promote the Charter." On October 8 Robert 
Yard wrote to the Lords Commissioners of Trade: "The Lords Justices desire 
you will lay before them the draft of the Charter you lately received from the 
Earl of Bellomont for Hervard Colledge in New England, together with such 
alterations and additions as your Lordships conceive necessary for His Ma- 
jesty's service to be made in the same." "The address reached the Board of 
Trade," writes Mr. Davis, "but apparently the draft of a Charter did not accom- 
pany it" (our Publications, i. 208). The Charter was sent to Sir Henry Ashurst, 
for on October 9 Mr. Yard's letter of the 8th was read, when "Their Lordships 
not having received any such draught ... as there referred to, the Secretary 
ordered to write to Sir Henry Ashurst for it;" and on the same day Popple wrote 
to Ashurst about the Charter. On October 29 Ashurst replied to Popple; on 
November 9 Popple wrote Bellomont that the Charter had been received from 
Ashurst, "who will attend their Lordships about it in a few days." On No- 
vember 19 the Council of Trade and Plantations received a letter from Ashurst 
of the 1st, with draught of a Charter for "Harward College." On February 11, 
1701, the Council of Trade and Plantations wrote to Bellomont: "We intend 
also shortly to lay before H.M. the New England Address about Harvard College 
etc. with a Representation upon that subject." On February 13 the "Address 
of the Massachusetts Bay relating to Harvard College" was "considered. Draught 
of the Charter for the College read and copy sent to Mr. Solicitor General for his 
opinion. Their Lordships also made some observations on the Charter." On the 
same day Popple wrote to Sir John Hawles, the Solicitor General: "By order of 
the Council of Trade and Plantations, I send you the inclosed draught of a 
Charter desired by the Government of the Massachusets Bay for a Colledg 
called Harvard College in that Province, upon which their Lordships desire to 
know your opinion how consistent it is with the Laws of England and with the 
usual forms in which Charters of this kind are passed here." On May 30 Popple 
wrote to Ashurst that the suspense in reporting on the Charter "is for want of 
Mr. Solicitor General's report on it." At this point all further trace of the Charter 
is apparently lost. (Massachusetts Province Laws, i. 308, vii. 245, 253, 260, 
636, 642, 643, 651, 652; Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 

1700, pp. 329, 412, 415-416, 419, 420, 533, 554, 555, 556, 625, 645, 663; id., 

1701, pp. 78, 80, 83, 270, 271; 1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, 
x. 350-351.) Cf. H. Newman's letter, p. Ixiii note, below. 

1 On August 10, 1703, Sewall wrote: "This day ... is a Corporation-Meet- 
ing at Cambridge; chuse Mr. Josiah Willard a Tutor: chuse Mr. Tho. and W™ 
Brattle into the Corporation, in stead of Mr. Allen and Mr. Walter, who have 



CHANGES IN THE COKPORATION, 1700-1707 lv 

died April 21, 1707; Vice President Willard resigned August 14, 1707; * 
and the five vacancies in fellowships were filled by the election of — 



abdicated as they reckon" (Diary, ii. 84: cf. p. 370, below). In writing "Mr. 
Allen," Sewall doubtless should have written "Mr. Mather," as Cotton Mather 
and Nehemiah Walter were clearly the two intended. "Neither of them," 
writes Quincy, "attended any meeting of the Corporation after the exclusion of 
President Mather. But the name of Allen appears occasionally among those 
present at the board, quite down to the change introduced by the revival of the 
first charter of the College, at the time of the accession of Leverett to the presi- 
dency" (History, i. 151). An examination of those present at meetings from 
August 5, 1700, to October 28, 1707 (see p. cli, below), shows that on August 10, 
1703, Walter had attended no meeting for three years, and Cotton Mather none 
for two years; while the attendance of Allen, who was present at twelve out of 
the nineteen meetings, was much more than "occasional." 

1 The Charter of 1700 required "That the President of the s d Corporation, as 
also all the Fellows & Tutors, thereof receiving salary shall reside at y e Colledge 
afores d " (Massachusetts Province Laws, vii. 259). On July 9, 1700, it was re- 
solved in the House, and concurred in Council on the 10th, that £220 be paid 
"to the President of Harvard Colledge, already chosen, or that shall be chosen 
by this Court. That the Person chosen President of Harvard Colledge Shall 
reside at Cambridge;" and a committee was appointed "To wait on the Reverend 
M r Increase Mather, and acquaint him, that this Court hath chosen him Presid* 
of Harvard Colledge, and Desire's, him to accept of s d office and so, Expect's, 
that he Repair to & reside at Cambridge, as soon as may be." On the same day 
Sewall saw Mather and on July 11 reported Mather's reply, which was that if 
his Church "Consented to give him up to this Work, he would as to his own 
person, remove to Cambridge, but could [not] see his way Cleer to remove his 
Family while [i. e. until] he heard of the passing of the Charter in England." 
Thereupon a committee was sent to the Second Church and on the 12th re- 
ported its consent. On the next day (July 13) it was "Ordered, That [the fifteen 
persons named in the Charter of 1700], with the two senior tutors for the time 
being, nominated to be fellows of the said corporation, be and hereby are em- 
powered to take the oversight, care and government of s d colledge and students 
there, . . . until his maj tie ' a pleasure shall be known referring to the settlement 
of said colledge, or that this court take further order therein" (vii. 255, 265, 644). 
Mather removed to Cambridge, but left October 17, 1700. On February 26, 1701, 
Stoughton "read a letter from Mr. Increase Mather, President of the Colledge, 
Oct. 17, 1700, giving an account of his inspection of the Colledge, whilst he re- 
sided there, and containing the reasons of his removal from Cambridge, as his 
not having his health there, etc., and desiring that another President might be 
thought of" (Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 1701, p. 100). 
This letter was communicated to the House, on March 13, 1701, the Council sent 
down to the Representatives an order about the College, and on the 14th this was 
approved, as follows: 

Whereas, this Court ... did by their order, past [July 13] . . . impower to 
the [fifteen persons named in the Charter of 1700] and the two senior tutors for 
the time being, ... to take the oversight, care and government of the said 



Ivi INTRODUCTION 

Jonathan Remington, January 4, 1703; 
Thomas Brattle, August 10, 1703; 
William Brattle, August 10, 1703; 
John Leverett, August 6, 1707; 
Ebenezer Pemberton, August 6, 1707. 



colledge and students, . . . and forasmuch as the constitution requires the 
president to reside at Cambridge, which is now altered by his removal from 
thence, to the intent that a present necessary oversight be taken of the colledge; 
it is therefore, — 

Ordered, That the s d M r Increase Mather, M r Samuel Willard, and the several 
other gentlemen mentioned in the aforerecited order, be and hereby are anew 
appointed and empowered to continue their oversight, care and government of 
the colledge, and students there, in manner as in the order is expres*, . . . and 
in case of M r Mather's refusal, absence, sickness or death, that M r Samuel 
Willard, nominated to be vice-presid*, with the other gentlemen before named, 
be and hereby are invested with the like powers and authority afores d in all 
respects (Massachusetts Province Laws, vii. 271-272). 

Mather again removed to Cambridge, but on June 30 he wrote to Stoughton: 

I promised the last General Court to take care of the Colledge until the Com- 
mencem*. Accordingly I have bin residing in Cambridge, these three months. 
I am determined (if the Lord will) to return to Boston the next week, and no 
more to return to reside in Cambridge; ... I do therefore earnestly desire that 
the General Court would as soon as may be think of another President for the 
Colledge (Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 226; printed in Province Laws, vii. 645; 
Quincy, History, i. 501-502). 

This letter was laid before the Court on August 1, when it was voted: "Whereas 
— the Rev nd M r Increase Mather hath Acquainted this Court, That he can with 
no Conveniency any longer Reside at Cambridge and Take the Care of the 
Colledge there. Resolved — That a Messenger be sent to the Rev nd M r Samuel 
Willard to Desire Him to accept the Care and Charge of s d Colledge, and to 
Reside at Cambridge in order thereunto agreeable to the Order of this Court in 
March last" (Province Laws, vii. 698). On August] 2 the committee reported 
that Willard had replied that "he would consider thereof? and advise with his 
Church." On August 5 a committee was appointed to go to the South Church 
"and desire their consent," but on the 6th reported that the Church "could not 
consent to part with him." On the 8th further application was made to the 
Church, and on the 9th it was — 

Resolved — That It be left with the Hon ble Councill, to take Care and Order 
what Shall be further necessary to the Settlem* of the Colledge until the next 
Assembling of this Court. 

That (if it may be) the Person who Shall have the chief Government of the 
Colledge Reside there, And Perform the Service that hath formerly been Dis- 
charged by Presidents (Province Laws, vii. 308). 

On September 3 Wait Winthrop — there being neither Governor nor Lieutenant- 
Governor — "rccorriended to them to provide for the Rule and Government of 
the Colledge at Cambridge" (Court Records, vii. 239). On the 5th, "Resolve 



KESIGNATION OF PRESIDENT MATHER, 1701 lvii 

Without either a President or a Vice President, the manage- 
ment of the College became intolerable, and on October 28, 



of the Representatives sent up, desiring Mr. Increase Mather to take the care of 
and reside at ye College, read. Joint Committee appointed to go unto Mr. 
Samuel Willard, to whom the Court had made application. He declared his 
readiness to do the best service he could for the College, and that he would visit 
it once or twice every week, and continue there a night or two, and perform the 
service used to be done by former Presidents" (Calendar of State Papers, 
America and West Indies, 1701, pp. 505-506). On the 6th the resolve of the 
House for inviting Mather "was again read, and, upon the question put for a 
concurrence, it was carried in the negative." Thereupon it was — 

Resolved, That the Rev d M r Samuel Willard nominated for Vice President of 
the Colledge, (together with the Gentlemen named for the Corporation in the 
Order of this Court) be desired to take the Care and Over Sight of the Colledge 
and Students there according to the late Establishm* made by this Court and to 
manage the affairs thereof, as he has proposed in his answer to this Court. Viz* 
to reside there for one or two days and nights in a week, and to perform prayers 
and Expositions in the Hall and to bring forward the Exercises of Analisyng 
(Province Laws, vii. 312, 703). 

Thus Mather's presidency came to an end. On April 28, 1702, "A question 
being moved upon the construction of the Order of Assembly for a temporary 
establishment of the government of the College, it was decided that Mr. Samuel 
Willard and the other gentlemen named are thereby sufficiently impowered to 
carry on the work of the approaching commencement and to confer degrees 
upon the Commencers" (Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 
1702, p. 279). In his speech on March 11, 1703, Governor Dudley said: 

I am often Sollicited, and Spoken to referring to the Colledge at Cambridge; 
I am Sorry for the Mistakes of this Governm* at any time in that Affair; If there 
be any thing that Imports me referring to it when it shall be Communicated I 
shall very freely do my duty to Lay it before Her Majesty, and in every thing 
referring to the good, and peace of this Province Exert myselfe to the Utmost 
and hope the Same of every Body in their proper Stations (Court Records, vii. 
363; cf. Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 1702-1703, p. 249). 

Under date of March 12, 1703, Cotton Mather wrote: 

And now, a strange Thing is this Day come to pass; which tho' it may plunge 
me into sore Distresses and Temptations, yett I see in it, a Demonstration of 
the Testimony from Heaven which I have in the Consciences of the People 
throughout the Land; notwithstanding all the Enemies which my vigorous 
Appearing for the evangelical Interests has procured for me. The House of 
Representatives, in the General Assembly, and as full an House as has been 
ordinarily known, unanimously, every Man of them, voted the most unworthy 
Man in the World, for to be President of the Colledge in Cambridge. God knowes, 
what further Trials are coming upon me! Lord, prepare and strengthen thy poor 
Servant, I pray thee, I pray thee! (Diary, i. 472). 

There is no mention of this matter in the Court Records of the 12th, but in 
Council on the 13th, — 



lvili INTRODUCTION 

1707, the Corporation — all the fifteen Fellows being present 
except Henry Gibbs, who did not arrive until after the vote 



An Order past in the House of Representatives, was Sent up for Concurrance, 
being in the Words following Viz* 

Ordered (nemine Contradicente) That the Rev d M r Cotton Mather be treated 
with in Order, to be Obtained, for a resident President of Harvard Colledge. 

Which being read at the Board, and the Question put for Concurrance, It was 
Carried in the Negative, And Sam 11 Sewall, and Nathaniel Byfield Esq 1-3 were 
directed to return the s d Order to the Representatives with a Message, That 
the Board Could not Accept a President Named by that House (Court Records, 
vii. 3G6). 

On March 19th — 

Cap* Samuel Checkley, Lieut nt Coll° John Goreham, and M r James Trobridge 
of the Representatives Attended his Excellency with a Message from the House 
to pray his Excellency to Inform them, of the Mistakes Committed by the 
Government in the Affair of the Colledge, intimated in his Excellency Speech, 
And to desire to know what his Excellency would please to Direct in that 
Affair. 

His Excellency acquainted them That the Mistakes referred to, were a first, 
Second, and third draught of a Charter of Incorporation for the Colledge Sent for 
England, and there refused, And that M r Speaker should hear from him upon 
the Other head of their Message (Court Records, vii. 372; cf. Calendar of State 
Papers, America and West Indies, 1702-1703, p. 275). 

The Court was dissolved on March 27, and in his speech to the new Court 
on May 27, 1703, Dudley said: "I shall continue to be very ready to do my 
Duty for the Advancem* of good Learning in the Colledge, And am of Opinion 
the particular Business of the Assembly therein is to provide a good Establishment 
for the Support of the Government of it, That I may humbly represent it in 
Order to obtain her Majesty's Favour to that Foundation" (Court Records, 
vii. 387). On January 2, 1705, "His Excellency intimated to the Council That 
by Letters from England There was Encouragement to hope that a Charter of 
Incorporation might be obtained from her Majesty for Harvard College in 
Cambridge if proper Application was made; and the Draught proposed in his 
late Majesties Reign was Ordered to be laid on the Board to be read" (Court 
Records, viii. 99; cf. Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, 1702- 
1703, p. 455). Apparently nothing further was done until the resignation of 
Willard. 

On August 11, 1707, writes Sewall, Willard went to Cambridge "to Expound," 
but found few scholars and was himself taken ill, "which oblig'd him to come 
from thence before Prayer-Time." On the 12th Sewall visited Willard "to see 
how his Journey and Labour at the College had agreed with him; and he sur- 
pris'd me with the above-account; told me of a great pain in's head, and sickness 
at his stomach; and that he believ'd he was near his end. I mention'd the busi- 
ness of the College. He desired me to do his Message by word of Mouth." Ac- 
cordingly, at a Council meeting on the 14th, "When the Gov 1 " enquired after 
Mr. Willard, I acquainted the Gov r and council that Mr. Willard was not capable 
of doing the College work, another year; He Thank'd them for their Acceptance 



ELECTION OF PKESIDENT LEVERETT, 1707 lix 

had been taken — elected John Leverett President and drew up 
an address to Governor Dudley recommending the election to 
his "favourable Acceptation" and asking him to present Lev- 
erett's name to the General Assembly. 1 On November 11, in 
Council, — 

Upon Reading an humble Address of the Fellows of Harvard College 
in Cambridge, Representing their Choice of M r John Leveret to be the 
present President of the said College, And Recommending him to his 
Excys favourable Acceptation, Withal praying that He would please to 
present him to the General Assembly & Move for his honourable Sub- 
sistence; — The above said Address being also accompanied with Ad- 
dresses from thirty nine Ministers; 2 

Voted that the said Election be Accepted, And that M r Leveret be 
Desired & Impowered to take the Care & Governm* of the College as 
President accordingly: Sent down to the Representatives; 

And Not Concur'd by that House. 3 



of his service and Reward. Gov r and Council order'd Mr. Winthrop and Brown 
to visit the Rev d Mr. Willard, and Thank him for his good service the six years 
past. Sent down for concurrence, and Depts to name persons to join in the 
Thanks and Condolence" (Diary, ii. 193). The Representatives concurred in 
the vote of thanks, but added this clause: "And That the Reverend M r Nehemiah 
Hobart as vice-President, together with the Gentlemen of the Corporation, be 
Desired, & Impowered to Take the Care & Government, of the s d Colledge, with 
the same Powers & Instructions, as were given to, & practisd by the s d M r Willard 
& Corporation, untill further order, from this Court. John Burrill Speak* " 
(Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 252. Cf. Court Records, viii. 311; Massachusetts 
Province Laws, viii. 795). "This," Sewall adds, "the Gov r and Council did not 
accept, and so nothing was done" (Diary, ii. 193). Willard lived only a few days, 
dying September 12, 1707. 

1 See pp. 379-380, below. On the same day Sewall wrote: "The Fellows of 
Harvard College meet, and chuse Mr. Leverett President: He had eight votes, 
Dr. Increase Mather three, Mr. Cotton Mather, one, and Mr. [William] Brattle 
of Cambridge, one. Mr. White did not vote, and Mr. Gibbs came when voting 
was over" (Diary, ii. 196). 

2 Five addresses, alike in language, were circulated, and received respectively 
12, 13, 7, 3, and 4 signatures. The originals are in Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 
254-260, and are printed in Massachusetts Province Laws, viii. 796, and in 
Quincy's History, i. 504-505 (where the names "Robert Buck," "Joseph Dwight," 
and "James Shephard," should be Robert Breck, Josiah Dwight, and Jeremiah 
Shepard). The addresses state that Leverett was "the unanimous choice" of 
the Fellows: but see Sewall's statement, quoted in the last note. The discrepancy 
can perhaps be explained by assuming that, after the manner of modern nomi- 
nating conventions, the choice was made unanimous. 

3 Court Records, viii. 325. 



Ix INTRODUCTION 

This vote was read in the House on November 12, 25, and 28, when 
it was non-concurred. 1 On November 29 was read in Council a 
" Message in Writing'' sent up by the Representatives "Moving the 
Board to join with the House in Chusing a suitable Person to take 
Care of the College until the Session of this Court in May next." 2 
On December 2 the "Vote of the Represent™ 3 sent up the 29 th " 
was again read in Council, and a motion was made that "there might 
be a Conference with the House thereupon;" this was acceded to, 
and "The House came up to the Council Chamber & attended the 
Conference." 3 On December 3 "The Vote of the Represent™ 8 
Moving the Board to join with the House in Chusing a suitable 
Person to take Care of the College until the Session of this Court in 
May next, again Read, & Upon the Question put, was Refused." 4 
On December 4 the Council revived the Charter of 1650, which, it 
declared, had "not been Repealed or Nulled," 5 and proposed that 
the House grant a suitable salary to the President; this was con- 
curred by the House on December 5, when the salary was fixed at 
£150, and the Council concurred on the 6th. 6 On January 8, 1708, — 

His Excellency intimated a Council to sit at Cambridge, upon Wednes- 
day the fourteenth currant for the affair of the Colledge and investiture 
of the president elect. And directed that the Gentlemen of the Council 
liveing at Charlestown, Salem and Ipswich, M r Speaker and the Rep- 
resentatives of the near Towns, and the Ministers of Boston, Charles- 



1 Massachusetts Province Laws, viii. 796. 2 Court Records, viii. 341. 

5 Court Records, viii. 342. 4 Court Records, viii. 343. 

5 In his extraordinary letter to Covernor Dudley dated January 20, 1708, 
Increase Mather said: "I am afraid that you cannot clear yourself from the guilt 
of much hypocrisy and falseness in the affair of the college. In 1686, when you 
accepted of an illegal arbitrary commission from the late K. James, you said, 
that the cow was dead, and therefore the calf in her belly; meaning the charter 
of the college and colony" (1 Massachusetts Historical Collections, iii. 126). 
Quincy (History, i. 81-82, 159-160, 276) held that all colonial ordinances fell 
when the Colony Charter of 1629 was vacated in 1684. On this point, see our 
Publications, i. 203-210, 214-215, xxv. 390-391; Palfrey, History of New Eng- 
land, iii. 412 note, iv. 193, 313; E. B. Russell, Review of the American Colonial 
Legislation by the King in Council (1915), pp. 177-178 (Columbia University 
Studies in History, etc., Ixiv. 595-596); J. S. Davis, Essays in the Earlier History 
of American Corporations (1917), i. 18-19, 21, 84-85; H. L. Osgood, American 
Colonies in the Eighteenth Century (1924), i. 320-324. The restoration of the 
Charter of 1650 appears to have been largely, if not chiefly, the work of Dudley. 

8 See pp. 380-381, below; Court Records, viii. 345; Sewall, Diary, ii. 205. 



INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT LEVERETT, 1708 ki 

town, Cambridge, Watertown, Roxbury and Dorchester be notifyed 
thereof and desired to give their presence at the Colledge at the time. 1 

And on January 14, 1708, — 

The Fellows and Overseers of the Colledge w th the Scholars and diverse 
Gentlemen from the several parts, attending the solemnity, His Excel- 
lency Instated M r John Leverett, in the Office of President of the Col- 
ledge, delivering him the Key's, Books, Seal, Instrum* 3 and writeings to 
the Colledge belonging, & directed him to take the care and Gov- 
ernment of that house and the Schollars there, with duty and alle- 
giance to our Soveraign Lady the Queen, and obedience to Her Maj ty ' s 
Laws. 2 

Finally, the method by which the Corporation of seventeen under 
the Charter of 1700 was reduced to the seven members prescribed by 
the Charter of 1650 is explained by Sewall: 

In the Library the Governour found a Meeting of the Overseers of the 
College according to the old Charter of 1650, and reduced the Number to 
seven; viz. Mr. Leverett President, Mr. Neh. Hobart, Mr. W m Brattle, 
Mr. Ebenezer Pemberton, Mr. Henry Flint, Mr. Jonathan Remington, 
Fellows; Mr. Thos. Brattle, Treasurer. 3 

Thus, after twenty-one and a half years, the " unsettlement " under 
which the College had labored since May, 1686, was brought to an 
end. The College is still governed under the Charter of 1650. 4 

Until recently it was supposed that, though discussion as to a royal 
charter still went on for a few years after 1700, no draught of such a 



1 Council Records, iv. 519. 

2 Council Records, iv. 519. A full account is given by Sewall, Diary, ii. 208. 
See also Boston News Letter, January 19, 1708, p. 2/2. 

3 Diary, ii. 209. Those who thus ceased to be Fellows were: James Allen, 
Samuel Angier, Thomas Brattle, John Danforth, Henry Gibbs, John Leverett, 
John Pierpont, Peter Thacher, Benjamin Wadsworth, and John White. Of the 
five Fellows named by Governor Dudley, two — Henry Flynt and Jonathan 
Remington — were Tutors. 

It will be remembered that under the Charter of 1700, the Treasurer was ex- 
cluded from the Corporation. But Treasurer Thomas Brattle, though thus not a 
member of the Corporation from July 12, 1700, to August 10, 1703, was on the 
latter date (p. Ivi, above) elected a Fellow of the Corporation. Though he 
ceased to be a Fellow of the Corporation on January 14, 1708, Thomas Brattle 
continued to be a member of the Corporation in his capacity as Treasurer. 

4 For five tables, showing the attendance at Corporation meetings in 1674- 
1684, 1690-1691, 1692-1696, 1697-1700, and 1700-1707, see pp. cxlv-cli, below. 



lxii 



INTRODUCTION 



charter had ever actually been prepared subsequent to the failure 
to obtain the King's assent to the Charter of 1700. Within a few 
years, however, there has been found the draught of such a charter 
in the hand of President Leverett. It is undated, but from internal 
evidence was doubtless drawn up between February 5 and June 4, 
1723, and obviously grew out of the difficulties that had taken place 
between 1720 and 1723 over the attempt of certain of the Tutors to 
obtain seats in the Corporation on the ground that they were Fellows 
in the meaning of that word as used in the Charter of 1650. 1 The 
draught of 1723 reverted to the form favored in the charters drawn 
up between 1G92 and 1700. Notable features were that John Leverett 
was to be President "for and during his natural life," that the Vice 
President was to be annually elected; that among the Fellows was 
included only one of the Tutors, and that the College was to have a 
person " to be present in the House of Representatives." It is reason- 
able to assume that this draught, besides being in the hand of Leverett, 
was actually prepared by him; but apparently it never came before 
either the Corporation or the Overseers or the Legislature, and no 
allusion to it has thus far been found. 2 



1 Cf. p. cxxxv,. below. 

2 See the Editor's paper, "Draught of a Royal Charter for Harvard College, 
1723," in our Publications, xxv. 390-400, where the draught is printed in full. 
It specified that the Corporation should consist of seventeen members — a 
President, a Vice President, a Treasurer, and fourteen Fellows, the following 
persons being named for those positions: 

John Leverett President 
Peter Thacher Vice President 
Edward Hutchinson Treasurer 



Nathaniel Appleton 
Joseph Belcher 
Simon Bradstreet 
Benjamin Colman 
William Cooper 
John Danforth 
Henry Flynt 



Fellows 



Henry Gibbs 
John Hancock 
Thomas Prince 
Joseph Sewall 
Benjamin Wadsworth 
Edward Wigglesworth 
- "William Williams 



Of these, Flynt was at once the only one not a clergyman and the only Tutor; 
and Appleton, Colman, Flynt, and Wadsworth were Fellows at the time the 
Charter was draughted. Thomas Robie (chosen a Tutor in 1714) had been elected 
a Fellow in 1722, but resigned on February 5, 1723, and the vacancy was not filled 
by the Corporation until June 4, 1723. The fact that Robie's name is not in the 






CHARTEK MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION, 1650-1723 lxiii 

In the following list of charter members of the Corporation from 
1650 to 1723, the names of clergymen are printed in italics, 1 the 
Class to which alumni of Harvard College belonged is given within 
parentheses (Roman type indicating graduates, italic type temporary 
students), while dates of death are attached to the seven persons who 
were not alumni of the College. 



above list is the reason for concluding that the Charter was drawn up between 
February 5 and June 4, 1723. 

After 1703 the affairs of the College apparently attracted little attention in 
England, for there is no reference to it from 1703 to June, 1711, beyond which 
date the Calendars have not yet been printed. It is possible that Leverett's 
draught was transmitted to England, for in 1725 inquiry was evidently being 
made there in regard to the College. On November 25, 1725, Henry Newman, 
presumably referring to the Charter of 1700, wrote as follows to Secretary 
Delafaye: 

It was sometime before I could find the Copy of the Charter of the College at 
Cambridge in New Engl d 

I find it was granted by the Gov 1 " and Council, who were always understood 
to be the Overseers of the College, though they have not declared themselves to 
be so, in express terms. 

The Lower House of Representatives as they have invaded the King's Pre- 
rogative in other things, so in this, there is nothing of moment done in the College 
now without consulting them: but if the Governm* here should think fit to 
grant them a Royal Charter now, I am perswaded they would thankfully accept 
it, and it would be a means to attach the Students there to the King's interest, 
who even now that they are dependant upon the Orders of the Assembly, have 
dared to dedicate their Theses to the Gov r in his absence, as a mark of their 
respect to the King's Representative, and to pray for him publickly, while others 
are afraid of shewing him so small a respect, for fear of incurring the displeasure 
of the mighty lower House (1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society* 
x. 350-351). 

For an explanation of the reference to the Theses for 1723, dedicated to Governor 
Shute, who was then in England, see our Publications, iii. 400-404; Proceedings 
American Antiquarian Society, xxiv. 285. 

1 By "clergymen" is meant those who had been ordained. Eight of those 
whose names are italicized — namely, William Brattle, Samuel Danforth, 
Jabez Fitch, Samuel Mather, Jonathan Mitchell, Ebenezer Pemberton, John 
Richardson, and Comfort Starr — were not clergymen at the time of their 
appointment, but were young men who had recently graduated. Down to 1697, 
every Tutor was a Fellow in its technical meaning of a member of the Corpora- 
tion; but not all Fellows were Tutors. Hence in time there arose the designations 
"non-resident Fellows" and "resident Fellows," the distinction being that 
resident Fellows were the young appointees actually engaged in teaching — that 
is, Tutors; while the non-resident Fellows were older men, mostly clergymen, 
settled over parishes (sometimes in Cambridge, chiefly elsewhere), though a few 
were not clergymen. Cf. pp. cxxxii-cxxxv, below. 



lxiv 



INTRODUCTION 



Charter M embers of the Corporation, 1650-1723 

A = Charter of 1650 
B = Charter of 1672 
C = Charter of 1692 
D - Proposed Charter of 1696 » 
E = Charter of 1697 

F = Proposed Charter of 1699, original draught 
G = Proposed Charter of 1699, amended draught 
H = Charter of 1700 
I - Proposed Charter of 1723 



A B C D 
A . . . 
. B . . 



E F G 



Presidents 
H I 



C D E F G H 



Henry Dunster 2 . . . . (d 1659) 

Leonard Hoar (1650) 

John Leverett (1680) 

Increase Mather (1656) 



Vice Presidents 

Charles Morton 

. I Peter Thacher . 

G H Samuel Willard 



(d 1698) 
(1671) 
(1659) 



D E F 



B C 



Treasurers 

Thomas Brattle (1676) 

Thomas Danforth ... (d 1699) 

I Edward Hutchinson . . (d 1752) 

John Richards .... (d 1694) 



C D E 



C D E F G 



Fellows 

Isaac Addington 3 
James Allen . . . 
Samuel Angler 
Nathaniel Appleton 
Joseph Belcher 
Simon Bradstreet 
William Brattle 4 . 
Joseph Browne 
Benjamin Colman 



(1662) 
(d 1710) 
(1673) 
(1712) 
(1690) 
(1693) 
(1680) 
(1666) 
(1692) 



1 The names under this proposed charter are included in this list, but see 
p. xliii note, above. 

1 It is sometimes stated that Josiah Quincy was the first layman — that is, 
the first person who had not been ordained — to become President of the College. 
If Henry Dunster was ordained, the fact has not been ascertained; though John 
Rogers preached and "had the title Reverend," there "does not appear to be 
any record of his ordination" (Sibley, Harvard Graduates, i. 167); and it seems 
to be certain that John Leverett, though he "studied divinity, and preached 
occasionally for several years" (id. iii. 181), was never ordained. 

s Addington was a temporary student, but his Class is not known with cer- 
tainty: see our Publications, xvii. 275, 278. 

* Brattle was ordained November 25, 1696. 



CHARTER MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION, 1650-1723 



lxv 



ABCD EFGHI 

G . . 

I 

. . . D E F G H I 

A B 

. . . D E . . . . 

A . . . 

G 2 H 3 . 

HU 

H I 

. . C 

I 

. . C 5 D E F G H . 
. . C D E F . . . 
. . C D E F G H . 

A : . 

A 

. . . D 

F . . . 

. B 

G 8 . . 

H . 

.1 

. B 

I 

G . . 

. B 

A 



Elisha Cooke . 
William Cooper 
John Danforth . 
Samuel Danforth 
Paul Dudley . 
Samuel Eaton . 
Jabez Fitch . . 
Henry Flynt . 
Henry Gibbs 
Nathaniel Gookin 
John Hancock . 
Nehemiah Hobart 
John Leverett . 
Cotton Mather . 
Samuel Mather 6 
Jonathan Mitchell 
Charles Morton 
Nicholas Noyes 
Urian Oakes 
Ebenezer Pemberton 
Jonathan Pierpont 
Thomas Prince 
John Richardson 9 
Joseph Sewall . . 
Samuel Sewall 
Thomas Shepard . 
Comfort Starr 10 . 



(1657) 
(1712) 
(1677) 
(1643) 
(1690) 
(1649) 
(1694) 
(1693) 
(1685) 
(1675) 
(1689) 
(1667) 
(1680) 
(1678) 
(1643) 
(1647) 
(d 1698) 
(1667) 
(1649) 
(1691) 
(1685) 
(1707) 
(1666) 
(1707) 
(1671) 
(1653) 
(1647) 



1 Danforth was ordained September 24, 1650. 

2 Fitch was not named in the amended Charter of 1699, but had that Charter 
been adopted he would have been a Fellow as one of "the two senior Tutors 
resident at the College from time to time." 

3 Fitch was not named in the Charter of 1700, but became a Fellow as one of 
" the two senior Tutors resident at the said College for the time being." He ceased 
to be both Fellow and Tutor about August, 1703, and was ordained October 24, 
1703. 

4 Flynt was not named in the Charter of 1700, but became a Fellow as one 
of "the two senior Tutors resident at the said College for the time being." 

5 Hobart declined his appointment under the Charter of 1692, and in his 
place the Corporation on July 26, 1692, elected Charles Morton a Fellow. 

6 Mather in 1650 went to England, where he was ordained. 

7 Mitchell was ordained August 21, 1650. 

8 Pemberton was not named in the amended draught of the Charter of 1699, 
but had that Charter been adopted he would have been a Fellow as one of "the 
two senior Tutors resident at the College from time to time." 

9 Richardson ceased to be both Fellow and Tutor in 1673, and was ordained 
October 20, 1675. 

10 Starr in 1650 went to England, where he was ordained. 



Ixvi 



INTRODUCTION 



(L B C 


D 


E 


F 


G 
G 


H 






D 


E 


F 




H 






D 


E 


F 


G 


H 






D 


E 


F 




H 




C 


D 


E 
E 


F 
F 


G 


H 
H 






D 


E 


F 


G 


H 




c 


D 


E 




G 





William Stoughton 
Peter Thacher . . . 
Samuel Torrey 1 . . 
Benjamin Wadsworlh 
Nehemiah Walter 
John White .... 
Edward Wigglesworth 
Michael Wigglesworth 
Samuel Willard . . 
William Williams . 
Wait Winthrop . . 



(1650) 
(1671) 
(1656) 
(1690) 
(1684) 
(1685) 
(1710) 
(1651) 
(1659) 
(1705) 
(d 1717) 



7 7 10 10 17 17 17 17 17 



Total number of Corporation 



Three further tables will prove useful. Table I gives the dates of 
the charters that became effective, the number of the Corporation in 
each, and the number of the Fellows who were also Tutors. Table II 
gives the number of Tutors from 1650 to 1750. Table III gives the 
number of resident Fellows — that is, Tutors who were also Fellows 
of the Corporation — from 1650 to 1780. Since 1780 no Tutor 
has been a Fellow of the Corporation. It should be added that 
from 1724 to 1792, one of the Professors was also a Fellow of the 
Corporation. 2 

I 







VICE 






TUTORS 


CHARTER 


PRESIDENT 


PRESIDENT 


TREASURER 


FELLOWS 


ALSO 
FELLOWS 


1650 


1 





1 


5 


2 or 3 


1672 


1 





1 


5 


2 or 3 


1692 


1 





1 


8 


2 


1697 


1 


1 


1 


14 





1700 


1 


1 





15 


2 3 






1 Torrey was a temporary student, but his Class is not known with certainty: 
see our Publications, xvii. 275, 284; Proceedings American Antiquarian Society, 
xxiv. 279 note. 

2 The elder Edward Wigglesworth was a Professor from 1722 to 1765, and a 
Fellow of the Corporation from 1724 to 1765; John Winthrop was a Professor 
from 1738 to 1779, and a Fellow of the Corporation from 1765 to 1779; and the 
younger Edward Wigglesworth was a Professor from 1765 to 1794 (Emeritus after 
1791), and a Fellow of the Corporation from 1779 to 1792. It will be observed 
that these Professors followed one another as Fellows, and that hence only one 
Professor was a Fellow of the Corporation at any given time. 

3 In this charter, thirteen Fellows were named and in addition "the two 
senior Tutors resident at the said College for the time being." 



FIRST HARVARD COLLEGE, 1642-1679 



lxvii 



II 

Number of Tutors, 1650-1750 l 
1650-1665 2 1677-1698 

1666-1672 3 1699-1719 

1672-1673 2 1720-1750 

1673-1676 3 



III 

Resident Fellows, 1650-1780* 

1650-1665 2 1716-1721 

1666-1672 3 1722-1723 

1672-1673 2 1723-1724 

1673-1676 3 1725-1754 

1677-1696 2 1755-1759 

1697-1699 1760-1766 

1700-1715 2 1767-1780 



College Buildings, 1637-1750 4 
First Harvard College (1642-1679) 

On October 28, 1636, the General Court agreed to give £400 
towards a schoale or colledge, whearof 200 + to bee paid the nexte 



1 The number of Tutors from 1650 to 1665 is purely conjectural, and the 
number from 1666 to 1685 is largely conjectural. From the list given on p. cxlvii, 
below, it appears that not more than two Tutors were present at any meeting of 
the Corporation in the years 1674-1684; yet from other sources it is certain that 
there were three Tutors during at least a portion of that period. 

2 A fifth Tutor was chosen by the Corporation on September 18, 1721, but 
on August 22, 1722, the Overseers refused to confirm the appointment on the 
ground that four Tutors were sufficient (pp. 461, 474, below). 

3 From 1650 to 1692, the resident Fellows and the Tutors were one and the 
same; and consequently the remark made in the last note but one about the 
Tutors applies equally to the resident Fellows. 

4 The extracts quoted in this section have been selected solely because they 
throw light on the buildings in use during the period under discussion. Some 
of the buildings are frequently mentioned in these records, while others are 
scarcely alluded to and so information in regard to them must be sought else- 
where. The history of the third President's House is here given for the first time. 

Though an Account of the College of New- Jersey (now Princeton University), 
including "A North- West Prospect of Nassau-Hall," was printed in 1764 (cf. our 
Publications, iii. 431-432), and though President Thomas Clap's Annals or 
History of Yale-College was published in 1766, yet nearly two centuries 
elapsed after its founding before Harvard College was similarly honored. 
There had, of course, been many accounts of or references to the College in 
books printed in England or in this country in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries, chief among which were New Englands First Fruits (1643), Cotton 



lxviii INTRODUCTION 

yeare, & 200* when the worke is finished, & the next Court to appoint 
wheare & w 1 building;" on November 15, 1637, "the colledg" was 

Mather's "Account of the University," comprising the fourth book of his Mag- 
nalia (1702), and Nathan Prince's Constitution and Government of Harvard- 
College (1743: cf. our Publications, xxi. 382-387). But what Ephraim Eliot, 
a graduate of the Class of 1780, wrote in his commonplace-book (cf. our Pub- 
lications, xviii. 54, 77, xix. 290, xxiv. 40, 47, 57, 141) under the heading "Hints 
for a good History of Harvard University" was still true at the time of his death 
in 1827: "There is wanted, a concise history of Harvard University. Little is 
known of its origin & its progress towards the respectable state in which it now 
stands." After referring to the Donation Book (mentioned below) compiled 
by his father the Rev. Dr. Andrew Eliot, he said: "There are now connected 
with the university many of the distinguished literary characters in this part of 
America and it is greatly wished that some of them would lead in a work of 
this kind." Some "Historical Sketches of Harvard College" were printed in 
the Harvard Register (the earliest magazine published by the students except 
the Harvard Lyceum, 1811-1812) for October, 1827 (pp. 248-251), November, 
1827 (pp. 283-286), and January, 1828 (pp. 345-348), the second of which gave 
an account of some of the buildings, though the account is without value. In 
1833 appeared the first History of Harvard University, that by Benjamin Peirce, 
which was followed in 1840 by President Quincy's work under the same title; 
but neither Peirce nor Quincy gave adequate accounts of the early buildings. 

The first attempt in print to ascertain the original ownership of the land now 
in the College Yard, and to locate some of the buildings, was made in 1848 by 
Mr. Samuel A. Eliot in his Sketch of the History of Harvard College, pp. 188-190, 
with a "Plan of the College Enclosure." Of the buildings that were in existence 
before 1750, the only ones indicated on Mr. Eliot's plan are the Indian College, 
the second Harvard College, Stoughton College, Massachusetts Hall, Wadsworth 
House, and Holden Chapel. The exact location of all these is known with cer- 
tainty except the Indian College, which Mr. Eliot placed a little north of the 
present Wadsworth House. Following President Wadsworth (p. lxxvii note, 
below), Mr. Eliot located in the College Yard the town grant in 1638 of two 
and two-thirds acres, identifying it with the two and one-quarter acres lying north 
of the Eaton and Gofife lots and east of the Betts and Spencer lots. This was 
probably a mistake, as the town grant appears to have been north of the present 
Kirkland Street. 

The two volumes of the Harvard Book, published in 1875, contain much 
information about the buildings, early and late, but the writers of the various 
articles had not made careful investigations. In 1881 an account of some of 
the early buildings was printed in 1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, 
xviii. 318-322, but this has little value. 

In the years 1888-1893 Mr. Davis wrote four papers, which at once super- 
seded all previous accounts and have been the basis of all subsequent accounts. 
These were: "The Site of the First College Building at Cambridge," in Pro- 
ceedings American Antiquarian Society, October, 1888, v. 469-486; "The Early 
College Buildings at Cambridge," in Proceedings American Antiquarian Society, 
April, 1890, vi. 323-349; "The Indian College at Cambridge," in Magazine of 
American History, October, 1890, xxiv. 33-39; "The College in Early Days," 






*v^ 



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ColUqe, (1655-1698) 



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6Stou<)h}on Co J ]eqe 6699-1781) 

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9Holdan Cka P ei(i744) 

I0jk<i|3ard-Mi!cr\e.ll-Liivey*tt-Vi<5a > ]e5worlk Hous« 
11 Parsonage (1670) 



Scale: 200 FeeMo 1 inch 



ENGRAVED FOR 1 




** ST 



I456-& 



am 

f MASSACHUSETTS 



FIRST HARVARD COLLEGE, 1642-1679 lxix 

ordered "to be at Newetowne;" on November 20, 1637, the Board 
of Overseers was created "to take order for a colledge at Newe- 



in Harvard Graduates' Magazine, April, 1893, i. 363-375. Those papers contain 
many interesting details not touched on in this section. 

The one event of importance since Mr. Davis wrote has been the uncovering 
of the foundation walls of two buildings in 1909-1910 when excavations were being 
made for the subway. See Mr. Lane's remarks in Proceedings Massachusetts 
Historical Society (December, 1909), xliii.201; in our Publications (January, 1910), 
xiii. 74; in the Harvard Graduates' Magazine (March, 1910), xviii. 451-452 (and 
photograph facing p. 460); and in the Harvard Crimson (February 19, 1915), de- 
scribing a tablet placed by the Harvard Memorial Society in the post in the College 
Yard fence and adjoining Wadsworth House to indicate "the site of the two earli- 
est College buildings." These were Goffe's College and the Peyntree house: 
see pp. lxxvii, civ, below. Cf . Harvard Alumni Bulletin, March 17, 1915, xvii. 441. 

In addition to the above printed sources, there are three manuscript accounts 
of value, two of which are found in the records here printed. The first was 
written between 1650 and 1684 (see p. lxxi note 1, below) by Thomas Danforth, 
who collected and copied into College Book III various items relating to gifts 
to the College, etc., some of which throw light on the early buildings. The 
second was written by President Wadsworth between December 10, 1733, and 
his death on March 16, 1737. On the former date he wrote: "Whereas y e lands 
and annuities belonging to Harvard College, are entred in y e College Books 
after a broken disjointed manner, I . . . thought it proper to collect said Entries, 
and what I find further belong to them, & enter them here, in a more uniform 
compact manner" (p. 264, below). The practice begun by Wadsworth (pp. 264- 
297, below) was continued by Holyoke (pp. 297-302, below) and by Langdon 
(pp. 302-305, below). These entries, however, contain little relating to the 
buildings in the College Yard. The third account was compiled in 1773 by the 
Rev. Dr. Andrew Eliot (see p. xviii, above), and is found in the first of two vol- 
umes labelled on the back of the cover "Donations" but commonly cited as 
Donation Book. The manuscript title reads: "An Account of Grants Donations 
and Bequests To Harvard College From the Foundation of that Society to The 
Year 1773. Collected by order of the Corporation." The portion compiled 
by Dr. Eliot fills most of the first volume, but at the end are some additions by 
President Langdon, James Winthrop (Librarian from 1772 to 1787), and others. 
On April 9, 1773, the Corporation took the following action: 

The Rev d D r Eliot having compiled an accurate Account of all the Bene- 
factions to Harvard College, from the foundation of the Society, with the Names 
of the generous Benefactors; and having declined accepting a Compensation for 
a Work upon which he has employed no small Time and pains, 

Voted, that the thanks of this Corporation be given to D r Eliot for this im- 
portant Service. 

Voted, that the sum of sixteen pounds be paid to M r Josiah Eliot for tran- 
scribing the above Account in a fair Manner. (College Book VII. 258.) 

Dr. Eliot's compilation contains little about the early buildings, but is of great 
value as regards gifts, bequests, etc. 

For the Plan of the College Yard facing p. Ixviii, the Society is indebted to 



1XX INTRODUCTION 

towne;" 1 on May 2, 1G38, it was ordered "that Newetowne shall 
henceforward be called Cambrige;" 2 and, John Harvard having 
died on September 14, 1G38, it was ordered on March 13, 1639, 
"that the colledge agreed vpon formerly to bee built at Cambridg 
shalbee called Harvard Colledge. ,, 3 Meanwhile, building had begun, 
for in a report enclosed in a letter of September 7, 1638, the Rev. 
Edmund Browne wrote: "Wee have a Cambridge heere, a College 
erecting, youth lectured, a library, and I suppose there will be a 
presse this winter." 4 A year earlier, presumably in or about No- 
vember, 1637, 5 the erection of the building had been placed in charge 
of Nathaniel Eaton, who, though a brilliant scholar, "marvellously 
deceived the Expectations of Good Men concerning him," 6 and 
was dismissed by the General Court on September 9, 1639, 7 when 
the building was still far from completion. The "care of carrying 

Mr. Warren H. Manning of Cambridge. On this plan, which closely follows 
Mr. Eliot's "Plan of the College Enclosure," but with corrections, are located 
(exactly or approximately) all the buildings described in this section except the 
second President's House (Dunster's house) and the third President's House. 
The second President's House probably stood near the present Johnston Gate, 
facing the west; and the third President's House stood on or near the site of 
Massachusetts Hall: see pp. cvi, cxiii, below. The dates are those of acquisition 
by the College. 

1 Massachusetts Colony Records, i. 183, 208, 217. 

2 i. 22S; cf. i. 180. 

3 i. 253. In all these early cases of the use of the word "college," it is prob- 
able that by it was meant a building: see pp. cxxviii-cxxxi, below. 

4 Our Publications, vii. 80. The letter enclosing the report is dated "Boston: 
Septemb: 7 th ," but no year is given, and "[1639]" was conjecturally added. 
This, however, was an error. Browne says in the report (vii. 76) that he came 
in the Thomas and Frances and that Emanuel and Lucy Downing were among 
his fellow-passengers. A letter by Emanuel Downing dated Salem, October 22, 
1638, is printed in the Winthrop Papers (i. 49), and elsewhere it is stated that 
the Downings "probably arrived in New England in October, 1638" (Win- 
throp Papers, iii. 23 note). Browne's letter proves that they arrived before 
September 7, 1638. The words "a College erecting" presumably refer to a 
building. 

6 P. 172, below. The Rev. Thomas Shepard of Cambridge, who was one of 
the elders named as Overseers on November 20, 1637 (seep, xxxiii, above), writing 
not later than 1649, in which year he died, said that "at the desire of some of 
our town the Deputies of the Court having got Mr. Eaton to attend the Schoole, 
the Court for that and sundry other reasons determined to erect the Colledge 
here" (Autobiography, 1832, p. 64). 

6 C. Mather, Magnalia, bk. iv. pt. i. § 2, p. 126. 

7 Massachusetts Colony Records, i. 275. 



FIKST HARVARD COLLEGE, 1642-1679 lxxi 

on the building begun by m r Eaton, was then committed to the 
management of m r Samuel Shepard and the College Stock putt into 
his hand." x 

Henry Dunster arrived from England early in August, 1640, and 
on the 27th of that month was elected President by the magistrates 
and elders — that is, presumably by the Overseers. 2 As to exactly 
what then occurred, there is some uncertainty, for there is no ab- 
solutely contemporaneous evidence to guide us. An entry in College 
Book III says that to Dunster was "committed the care & trust 
for finishing of the Colledge buildings and his own lodgings & 
the Custody of the Colledge Stock." 3 On the other hand Dun- 
ster himself, in a letter dated December, 1653, stated that "About 
10 magistrates & 16 Elders cald mee ... to undertake y Q in- 
structing of y e youth of riper years & literature after they came 
from gramer schools," and that "no further care or distraction 
was imposed on mee or expected fro mee but to instruct." . He 
then went on to say: 



1 P. 173, below. See p. Ixxii note 1, below. 

The entries on pp. 1-85 of College Book III (pp. 171-254, below), including 
the one quoted in the text, are almost wholly in the hand of Thomas Danforth. 
Ranging from 1636 to 1684, many are copied from College Book I, others appar- 
ently from College Book II, and still others from miscellaneous documents the 
originals of which are no longer extant. Hence many of the entries are of great 
value, and several difficult problems could be solved if it were known exactly 
when the entries were made. But on this point, unfortunately, we are all at sea. 
Born in England in 1622, Thomas Danforth came to Cambridge with his father 
Nicholas in 1635, and thus when Eaton was dismissed in 1639 he was a youth 
of seventeen. He is not known to have had any official connection with the 
College until 1650, after which he was in its service — as Treasurer from 1650 to 
1668 and as Steward from 1668 to 1682, besides having been chosen clerk of the 
Overseers in 1654. And he continued to make his entries after ceasing to be Stew- 
ard, the latest being dated January 3, 1684. He died November 5, 1699, having 
filled many civil as well as collegiate offices. Hence, though none of the entries 
are likely to have been made before 1650, any one of them may have been made 
at any time between 1650 and 1684. 

2 In his letter of 1653, Dunster said that he was "called" by "about 10 magis- 
trates & 16 Elders." The original Board of Overseers consisted of six magistrates 
and six elders (see p. xxxiii, above). If Dunster's recollection was correct, evi- 
dently others had been summoned to the meeting at which he was chosen. 

3 P. 173, below. In Quincy's History (i. 453), in Proceedings American Anti- 
quarian Society (vi. 323), and in G. E. Littlefield's Early Press of Massachusetts 
(i. 72), the words "Colledge Stock" are rendered without meaning by being 
printed "College Book." 



1XX11 INTRODUCTION 

For y e building was comitted to M r Hugh Peeter, M r Sam. Shep- 
heard, 1 & M r Joseph Cook, who prudently declined y e troble & left it to 
y° two first. They also when they had finished y e Hall (yet w th out 
skreen table form or bench) went for England leaving y e work in y e 
Carpenters & masons hands w th out Guide or further director, no floar 
besides in & aboue y e hall layd, no inside sepating wall made nor any one 
study erected throughout y e house. Thus fell y e work upon mee. 3 d 
8 ber 1641: w ch by y e Lords assistance was so far furthered y* y e students 
dispersed in y e town & miserably distracted in their times of concourse 
came into comons into one house 7 ber 1642. & w th y m a 3 d burthen upon 
my shoulders, to bee their steward, & to Direct their brewer, baker, 
buttler, Cook, how to pportion their comons. 2 

This building, the first Harvard College, was thus described in 1643 : 

The Edifice is very faire and comely within and without, having in it 
a spacious Hall; 3 (where they daily meet at commons, Lectures, Exer- 
cises;) and a large Library with some Bookes to it, the gifts of diverse of 
our friends, their Chambers and studies 4 also fitted for, and possessed 

1 Hugh Peters sailed for England August 3, 1641 (our Publications, iii. 420 
note 2). Samuel Shepard, a half-brother of the Rev. Thomas Shepard, was a 
Deputy from Cambridge in 1639, 1640, and 1644 (Paige, History of Cambridge, 
pp. 460, 653-654), and returned to England about October, 1645 (our Publica- 
tions, iii. 420 note 2). The entry in these records about Shepard (quoted above 
in the text) and the statement by Dunster are good examples of the difficulty of 
reaching definite conclusions on account of conflicting evidence or lack of abso- 
lutely contemporaneous documents. The entry is not likely to have been made 
before 1650 (see p. Ixxi note 1, above), and Dunster's letter was not written 
until 1653. The entry mentions Shepard only, without allusion to Peters; and 
Shepard's account (pp. 17-19, below) from 1639 to 1641, when he turned the 
management of the College building and the College stock over to Dunster, is 
written in the first person singular and contains no reference to Peters. It is 
well known that when Peters went to England in 1641, he, Thomas Weld, and 
William Hibbcns were entrusted with the task of collecting there funds for the 
College and for other purposes (see our Publications, xiv. 121-126), and it is 
possible that Dunster, writing a dozen years later, confused that episode with 
the management of the College building and stock in 1639-1641. Dunster's 
accounts, presented January 15, 1655, are mentioned in these records (pp. 173, 
1S0-1S1, 186-187, below), but are not entered in detail, though the inventory of 
the College estate taken by him and the Fellows on December 10, 1654, is entered 
(pp. 208-210, below). 

2 Our Publications, iii. 419, 420. 

3 See p. cxxi, below. 

4 In these records there are many references to "studies" (see the index), 
and three or four to "cabins" (pp. 9, 12, below). "What were these studies," 
asked Mr. Davis, "of which there were three in some chambers and four in 



FIRST HARVARD COLLEGE, 1642-1679 lxxiii 

by the Students, and all other roomes of Office necessary and convenient, 
with all needfull Offices thereto belonging: And by the side of the Col- 
ledge a faire Grammer Schoole, for the training up of young Schollars, 
and fitting of them for Academicall Learning, that still as they are judged 
ripe, they may be received into the Colledge of this Schoole; Master 
Corlet x is the Mr., who hath very well approved himself e for his abilities, 
dexterity and painfulnesse in teaching and education of the youth under 
him. 2 

In 1651 Edward Johnson wrote: 

The scituation of this Colledg is very pleasant, at the end of a spacious 
plain, more like a bowling green, then a Wilderness, neer a fair navi- 
gable river, environed with many Neighbouring Towns of note, being so 
neer, that their houses joyn with her Suburbs, the building thought by 
some to be too gorgeous for a Wilderness, and yet too mean in others 
apprehensions for a Colledg, it is at present inlarging by purchase of 
the neighbour houses, it hath the conveniences of a fair Hall, comfort- 
able Studies, and a good Library, given by the liberal hand of some 
Magistrates and Ministers, with others. 3 



others, whose walls were 'dawbed,' or 'plaistered and whitened,' or 'seiled with 
cedar round about'? It is plain that they must have been very small, and it is 
possible that the partition which separated them from the chambers did not 
reach the ceiling. ... In the table of the income of the studies [pp. 14-15, 
below], two are described as having fires in them. Of course these must have 
been larger than the studies within the chambers and were, perhaps, full-sized 
rooms. ... In the chambers were 'cabins' or closets which were specifically 
assigned. Sometimes the cabin assigned to a student was not situated in the 
chamber where he lodged" (Proceedings American Antiquarian Society, vi. 
337-339). In our Publications, xxiv. 94-95, 100-101, are reproduced two plans 
of Massachusetts Hall, one by President Leverett, the other by Benjamin 
Wadsworth, then a Fellow. The studies are plotted on the Wadsworth plan, 
and on the Leverett plan each is marked "Study." 

1 It will be observed that when Samuel Shepard was entrusted in 1639 with 
the College building and stock, nothing was said about teaching. The late George 
E. Littlefield suggested in 1913 that when Eaton left the College in September, 
1639, Elijah Corlet "may have been invited to assist in, if not to take full charge 
of, the education"of the students in the College, until the arrival of Mr. Dunster 
in August, 1640" (our Publications, xvii. 134). There is, however, no evidence 
in support of this notion; and nothing has ever been adduced to show who did 
carry on the work of teaching from September 9, 1639, to August 27, 1640. 
Equally without foundation in fact was Mr. Littlefield's suggestion that perhaps 
the presidency of the College had been offered to the Rev. Jose Glover (Early 
Massachusetts Press, 1907, i. 50-53). 

2 New Englands First Fruits (1643), pp. 12-13. 

3 Wonder-working Providence (1654), pp. 164-165. 



lxxiv INTRODUCTION 

In the inventory "of the whole Estate of Harv d College," taken 
by the President and Fellows on December 10, 1654, the first item 
reads : 

The building called the old Colledge, conteyning a Hall, Kitchen, 
Buttery, Cellar, Turrett & 5 Studyes & therein 7 Chambers for Students 
in them, a Pantry & small come Chamber. A library & Books therein, 
vallued at 400*. 1 

The building was wretchedly constructed and soon showed signs 
of decay. As early as July, 1647, President Dunster presented a 
petition to the Commissioners of the United Colonies in which he 
said : 

Seaventhly seeing from the first euill contrivall of the Colledg build- 
inge there now ensues yearly decay es of the rooff, walls & foundation, 
w c h the study rents will not carry forth to repaire, Therefore we present 
it to your wisdome to propounde some way to carry an end to this 
worke. 2 

In reply to another request for help, the General Court said on 
June 21, 1650: "for the desire of enlargment of buildinge, the Courte, 
beinge so farre in debt, are in no capacitie at psente to encourage it, 
as otherwise they would." 3 In September, 1651, the Commissioners 
replied to Dunster: "By youers of august 27 th wee vnderstand that 
the former college buildings are in a decaying condition and will 
Require a considerable charge ere long for a due Repaire and that 
through the encrease of Scollers many of them are forced to lodge 
in the Towne." 4 On May 27, 1652, the President prayed "that such 
course maybe taken as the ruinous and streightned buildings of the 
colledge maybe enlardged and repajred;" 5 and the Court in reply 
on May 31 advised a voluntary contribution, and repeated the sug- 
gestion on October 19. 6 In September, 1653, application was again 
made. 7 On May 9, 1655, the Corporation informed the General 
Court that — 



1 P. 208, below. 

2 Plymouth Colony Records, ix. 95. 

3 Massachusetts Colony Records, iii. 208. 

4 Plymouth Colony Records, ix. 216-217. 

6 Massachusetts Colony Records, vol. iv. pt. i. 91. 

• iii. 275, 280. 

' iii. 331. 



FIKST HARVARD COLLEGE, 1642-1679 lxXV 

The Colledge building although it be new groundsilled by y e help of 
some free Contributions y e last year, yet those ceasing & y e worke of 
Reparation therew th intermitted, it remains in other respects, in a very 
ruinous condition. It is absolute necessity, y* it bee speedily new cov r ed, 
being not fitt for Scholars long to abide in, as it is. And wi th out suche 
Reparasion some time this Summer both y e whole Building will decay, 
& so y e former charge about it be lost, and the Scholars will be forced to 
depart. So y* either help must be had herein, or else (we fear) no less 
then a Dissolution of y e Colledge will follow. 1 

In August, 1676, the books were transferred from this building 
to the second Harvard College. 2 By May 23, 1677, the building had 
"fallen doune, a part of it, and thereby rendered not habitable;" 3 
and the remainder was taken down doubtless in or about 1679, the 
exact date being unknown. 4 

That the College owned a bell in the very early days is shown by 
the "Rules, and Precepts that are observed in the Colledge" printed in 
a pamphlet published in London in 1643, one of which reads: 

7. Every schollar shall be present in his Tutors chamber at the 7th. 
houre in the morning, immediately after the sound of the Bell, at his 
opening the Scripture and prayer, so also at the 5th. houre at night, and 
then give account of his owne private reading, as aforesaid in Particular 
the third, and constantly attend Lectures in the Hall at the houres ap- 
pointed. But if any (without necessary impediment) shall absent himself 
from prayer or Lectures, he shall bee lyable to Admonition, if he offend 
above once a weeke. 5 

This bell, the fourth (or possibly the third) to reach Massachusetts 
and the only bell in Cambridge between 1636 and 1648, 6 hung in 



1 Massachusetts Archives, l'viii. 32. On April 13, 1663, the town "granted 
Liberty To y e Colledge for posts & rayles to fence in the yds. & a clapbord tree;" 
and on November 14, 1663, it "Granted to y e Coll: liberty for timb: to shingle 
the rooffe" (Cambridge Town Records, pp. 144, 148). 

2 See p. lxxxvi, below. 

3 See p. Ixxxviii, below. 

4 See p. Ixxxviii note 2, below. 

5 New Englands First Fruits, p. 14. The passage is printed in full because 
it is not found in the College Laws of 1642-1646 entered in these records. 

6 The first bell in Massachusetts came to Cambridge (then Newton) in 1632 
and was hung in the meeting-house of the Thomas Hooker company, but when 
that company migrated in 1636 to Hartford, Connecticut, the bell was taken 
with it. The second bell was at Salem in 1638. A bell was owned by the First 



Ixxvi INTRODUCTION 

the turret of the first Harvard College until about 1659, when 
"M r John Willet gave to the Colledge the Bell now hanging in the 
Turrett." 1 There the bell given by Willet remained until the turret 
fell down about 1G77, when doubtless it was transferred to the 
belfry of the second Harvard College. 

A College clock is mentioned as early as 1660, 2 but where it was 
placed is not known. 

The precise location of the first Harvard College has never been 
determined, but doubtless it stood on the Eaton lot, on or near the 
site of the present Grays Hall, 3 and its approximate location is indi- 
cated on the plan facing page Ixviii. 



Church, Boston, in 1641. Whether this last was the third or the fourth bell is un- 
certain, because it is not known exactly when the College bell was sent over. The 
fifth bell was at Ipswich in 1647, the sixth at Watertown in 1648, and the seventh 
at the First Church, Cambridge, in 1648. See the late Dr. Arthur H. Nichols's 
paper on "The Bells of Harvard College," read before this Society in April, 
1910 (xiii. 133) and printed in the New England Historical and Genealogical 
Register for July, 1911 (Ixv. 275-284). Dr. Nichols remarked that "while the 
colonists brought from England an attachment for musical bells they were also 
accurate in the use of technical words relating to them;" and proceeded to explain 
two such words often found in these records: 

"Hence their discrimination in the use of the words 'ring' and 'toll.' For 
instance, the bell was ' rung ' to give preliminary warning of approaching service, 
recitation or meals; that is, it was swung so as to describe a complete revolution, 
backward and forward, with each impact of the clapper, and the interval between 
the strokes was therefore long. 

"But to give notice that service or recitation was about to begin, or that 
meals were about to be served, the bell was 'tolled,' or swung only over a small 
arc of the circle in such a way as to allow the clapper to fall upon but one side 
of the sound bow. For deaths and funerals, however, it was customary to mount 
the belfry and toll the bell once in fifteen seconds by means of a rope hitched to 
the flight, or lower extremity of the clapper" (lxv. 279). 

1 P. 200, below. Between 1654 and 1663 a bell, presumably the one displaced 
by the Willet bell, was exchanged (p. 212, below). For other references to bells ; 
see the index to these volumes. 

2 P. 193, below. For the clock on Massachusetts Hall, see p. cii, below; 
and for other references to clocks, see the index to these volumes. 

■ See the extract quoted from Mr. Davis on p. lxxxiv, below. 

Attention has already been called (p. lxxi note 1, above) to the impossibility 
of ascertaining exactly when Thomas Danforth, made the entries which fill 
pp. 1-85 of College Book III (pp. 171-254, below). Two striking instances de- 
serve consideration, as they furnish what is perhaps the most difficult crux in 
the records hore printed. In one place, referring apparently to the year 1659, 
he wrote: "M r William Paine Merch 1 gave to the Colledge Twenty pounds, 



goffe's college, 1651-1660 lxxvii 

Goffe's College (1651-1660) 

Of this building little is known. The second item in the inventory 
of December 10, 1654, reads: "Another house called Goffes Colledge, 



to be layd out for the purchase of lands: & with s d mony the lands whereon the 
Colledge now stands & the Presidents lodgings was bought, conteyning about 
One acre & a Rood" (p. 198, below). To this entry President Wadsworth has 
added the words: "See Coll. B. 2. p. 38." If Danforth's entry was actually 
made in 1659, then by "the Colledge" must have been meant the first Harvard 
College. But in that case, why were the precise words "whereon the Colledge 
now stands" employed? They suggest that once the college stood elsewhere. But 
in 1659 there was only one building known as "the College" — namely, the first 
Harvard College; and had the entry been written in 1659, it is difficult to see 
why the word "now" should have been used. This difficulty was noted by 
Thaddeus W. Harris (Librarian from 1791 to 1793), who wrote in pencil in the 
margin: "The 2 d Harvard, which was burnt." 

In another place, in "An Abbreviate of the Colledge Accounts, conteyning 
both recits and disbursements from October. 1654 untill December. 1663," 
Danforth entered £20.10.0 "To a parcell of land on w ch the Coll. now stands" 
(p. 212, below). Again occurs the word "now" and at a date when only the 
first Harvard College was in existence. Once more Mr. Harris has written in 
pencil: "'on which the Coll. now stands' is an interpolation, not written by 
Treasurer Danforth, at the above named date, if by him at all, and probably 
written as late as the year 1683. The College referred to was the 2 d Harvard, 
which was burnt in 1764, & on the site whereof the 3d Harvard Hall was built." 
The present Editor has added the comment: "The words 'on w ch the Coll. now 
stands' were perhaps written later but are certainly in Danforth's hand" (p. 212 
note 2, below). 

The correct interpretation of Danforth's two entries is of importance, because 
those entries raise the question of the location of the first Harvard College; and 
hence the necessity of ascertaining, if possible, whether those entries were written 
in or before 1663, in which case they indicate the first Harvard College, or not 
until some twenty years later, in which case they refer to the second Harvard 
College. Some entries made by President Wadsworth in 1733 throw light on 
the subject, especially as he three times uses the word "now." He wrote: 

"As for yt oblong parcel of Land, on which y e three Colleges & y e President's 
House & Barn now stand; I suppose y e Easterly part of it, was granted by y® 
Town of Cambridge An. 1638. to y e use of a publick school or College forever 
containing 2f Acres. The College expended on it. above £300. (See Coll. Book 
N° 3. p. 2) & it appears not yt y e Town ever allow'd them their charges" (p. 265, 
below). 

By the "three Colleges & y e President's House" Wadsworth meant the second 
Harvard College, Stoughton College, Massachusetts Hall, and Wadsworth 
House. The reference is to p. 172, below, where Nathaniel Eaton's account in 
1639 of expenditures on the first Harvard College is entered. Wadsworth was 
probably mistaken in supposing that the town grant in 1638 of two and two- 
thirds acres formed "the easterly part" of the oblong parcel of land in the College 



lxxviii INTRODUCTION 

and was purchased of Edw: Goffe, conteyning five Chambers. 18 
Studyes. a Kitchen Cellar & 3 garretts." l From what Edward 

Yard, for the town grant appears to have been north of the present Kirkland 
Street (see p. lxviii note, above). Wadsworth then continued: 

"The westerly part of y e South end (where y e President's House now is) was 
bought of Edward Goffe w th a Building on it, afterwards call'd Goffe's College. 
See Coll. Book. n° 2. p. 18. n° 3. p: 41" (p. 265, below). 

College Book II is not extant, but the other reference is to p. 208, below, where 
Goffe's College is mentioned in the inventory of 1654. By "where y* 5 President's 
House now is," Wadsworth meant Wadsworth House. Wadsworth again con- 
tinued: 

"That part wch runs northward from Cambridge Meeting House, even to a 
rod or two north of y e present old College, was bought of John Betts. April. 4. 
1661. . . . This Land was bought with money given to y e College by m r William 
Payn merchant, and by his son. See Coll. B. n° 2. p. 38. B. 3. p. 30" (p. 265, 
below. The Betts lot was bought by the College on April 24, not 4, 1661: Mid- 
dlesex Deeds, xiii. 425). 

By the "present old College" is meant the second Harvard College, and the 
reference to "B. 3. p. 30" is to the entry in Danforth's hand (quoted above, p. lxxvi 
note 3) about William Paine on p. 198, below. 

One more extract from Wadsworth is pertinent. "On y e south side of y e 
street," he wrote, referring to what was then Braintree Street but is now Massa- 
chusetts Avenue, "Just before y e President's House as it now stands," — that 
is, Wadsworth House — "is a small piece of Land belonging to y e College; it 
was formerly Robert Bradish's House Lot" (p. 266, below). The seventh item 
in the inventory of December 10, 1654, is: "A small piece of land lying before 
the Colledge & formerly the houselott of Rob* Broadish" (p. 208, below). The 
word "Colledge," as here used, must refer not to the land owned by the in- 
stitution but to the building — that is, the first Harvard College. It is certain 
then that the first Harvard College faced the Bradish lot, and that lot was at 
the northwest corner of Braintree Street (now Massachusetts Avenue) and 
the present Holyoke Street — the lot, namely, on which Holyoke House now 
stands. 

Wc have, then, these proved facts: that the Bradish lot was "before" the 
first Harvard College; that the Bradish lot was "just before" Wadsworth House; 
and that the Betts lot "runs northward from Cambridge Meeting House." Now 
between the years 1654 and 1663 William Paine gave £20 and his son John 
Paine gave £10 (pp. 200, 214, below). Wadsworth said that with this money 
the Betts lot was bought in 1661. Danforth said that with the money was 
bought the land "whereon the College now stands & the Presidents lodgings" 
or the land "on w ch the Coll. now stands." But money received between 1654 
and 1663 could not have been used for the purchase either of the Eaton lot or of 
the Goffe lot, for the former came into the possession of the College about 1640 
and the latter was bought about 1651. Consequently, as the land "whereon the 
Colledge now stands" was the Betts lot, and as it was on that lot that the second 

1 P. 208, below. 



goffe's college, 1651-1660 lxxix 

Johnson said in 1651 about the College "at present inlarging by 
purchase of neighbour houses/' 1 it is probable that Goffe's College 

Harvard College was built, the building referred to by Danforth must have been 
the second Harvard College. 

In his final paper Mr. Davis wrote: 

"When I made my original analysis of the material I rejected from considera- 
tion two entries in Book III, opposite which, in the margin, were pencil notations 
to the effect that they referred to the second building. These pencillings were 
attributed to T. W. Harris, and I assumed that the writer had good reasons for 
his conclusions. Approaching the subject a second time, with an opinion derived 
from sources entirely outside these two notations, I can see no sound reason why 
the pencil notations should have been made. If Mr. Harris's conclusion be 
rejected, and the language of the entries be accepted precisely as written, it would 
appear that, at the time the entries were made, which must have been between 1654 
and 1663, the College building stood upon a lot of land which had the same area as 
each of the Braintree Street lots [the Goffe lot and the Eaton lot], viz: — An acre 
and a rood; that this lot of land cost £20, and that the money for its purchase was 
contributed by William Paine" (Harvard Graduates' Magazine, i. 368 note). 

In saying that the Danforth entries "must have been made between 1654 and 
1663," Mr. Davis begged the question. For the point to be determined is not 
the date of the original documents, but the time when Danforth wrote or copied 
them into College Book III. The present Editor's conclusions are as follows. 
(1) Danforth's entry about William Paine was not written until or after 1680, 
by which time the first Harvard College had been demolished. Hence, to make 
it plain which lot was bought with the Paine money, Danforth described it as 
"the lands whereon the Colledge now stands & the Presidents lodgings." Both 
the second President's House (1645-1680) and the third President's House (1680- 
1719) appear to have been on the Betts lot, and hence near the second Harvard 
College (see pp. cvi, cxiii, below). (2) The original document containing Dan- 
forth's "Abbreviate of the Colledge Accounts" from 1654 to 1663 must have been 
written in 1663, and in that original document one item presumably read: "To a 
parcell of land £20.10.0." When Danforth copied that document into College 
Book III, he made the entry as originally written and then, again to make it plain 
which lot had been bought, interpolated, either when copying the entry or at some 
time after about 1680, the words "on w ch the Coll. now stands." 

Another point requires explanation. In his first paper Mr. Davis reproduced 
a tracing of a map entitled "Plan of Cambridge, adapted to the year 1635. By 
James Winthrop, January 1801." At the top of this map are written the words: 
"College founded 1638, and built near this place a little south of its present 
site." By its "present site" was meant the present Harvard Hall, which stands 
on the site of the second Harvard College. Quoting these words, Mr. Davis 
remarked: "A reasonable interpretation of this language would throw the site 
within the limits of the Braintree-street lot" — that is, the Eaton lot. "It is 
unfortunate," continued Mr. Davis, "that Mr. Winthrop did not give his au- 
thority for the statement." (Proceedings American Antiquarian Society, v. 484 
note. The map faces the same page.) Mr. Winthrop's authority can be found 

1 P. lxxiii, above. 



lxXX INTRODUCTION 

was bought in or about that year. As there are no references to 
Goffe's College in the College records after about 1656, and as it is 



in several entries in these records. On August 29, 1704, the Corporation voted 
that Treasurer Brattle "be Jmpoured to Let a piece of Land of y e College's, 
lying neare w r y e old College stood to m r Andrew Bordman or any other person, 
for Such term of yeares, & upon Such conditions as they shall agree upon" 
(p. 373, below). In "An Inventory of the Estate belonging to Harvard College" 
dated July 1, 1712, Treasurer Thomas Brattle entered "A p 8 of Land near y e 
Coll g Let to M r And w Bordman" (p. 418, below); and in a similar inventory 
dated August 16, 1715, Treasurer William Brattle (who had succeeded his brother 
Thomas in 1713) entered "A Small p c of Land near y* Old College for w ch M r 
A Bordman pays" (p. 430, below). 

On August 29, 1704, the presidency being then vacant, the Corporation con- 
sisted of sixteen persons, all of whom were present except Jonathan Pierpont 
(1685) and Henry Flynt (1693). Four others — Henry Gibbs (1685), John 
White (1685), Benjamin Wadsworth (1690), and Jonathan Remington (1696) — 
were probably too young to have seen the first Harvard College. The senior 
Fellow of the Corporation was James Allen, who, born in England, was ordained 
minister of the First Church, Boston, on December 9, 1668; attended meetings 
of the Overseers in 1675, 1678, and 1684 (pp. 76, 232, 236, 237, 255, below), 
and may have attended earlier meetings; and became a member of the Cor- 
poration in 1692. The others were Michael Wigglesworth (1651), Samuel Torrey 
(a temporary member of about 1656), Vice President Willard (1659), Nehemiah 
Hobart (1667), Peter Thacher (1671), Samuel Angier (1673), Thomas Brattle 
(1676), John Danforth (1677), and William Brattle (1680). Hence, though 
the meeting took place about twenty-five years after the demolition of the first 
Harvard College, there were present no fewer than ten persons who must often 
have seen that building, some of whom had doubtless lived in it, and all of whom 
except Mr. Allen may have lived in it. 

President Wadsworth's statement, made in 1733, that on the south side of 
Braintree Street (now Massachusetts Avenue), "Just before" the house in which 
he was himself residing, was a small piece of land belonging to the College, 
formerly Robert Bradish's house lot, has already been quoted in this note. He 
then went on to define the bounds of that land "When it was leas'd to Steward 
Bordman. 1705," and added, "I suppose part of Steward Bordman's Barn now 
stands on y e northwest corner of this Land. This Land was call'd y* House Lot 
of Robert Bradish" (p. 266, below). Many years later, in 1774 or 1775, President 
Langdon added this memorandum: 

N B Part of this Land was taken into y* Presidents use in Autumn 1770: 
leaving so much of it with out y e fence then made as might accommodate M r 
Andrew Boardman to go to his Barn. Agree d by y e Corporation that he should 
have some at y e west End left him and more on y* South west Corner but no 
lease was given of it twas only allowed for the present — and no sum was fixed 
as a consideration for y° use of it (p. 266, below). 

In another place, but at the same time, President Langdon drew a plan showing 
the "Presidents House Lot" at the top, in front of it "North Side Street" (which 
was the Braintree Street of the seventeenth century and is now Massachusetts 



goffe's college, 1651-1660 lxxxi 

not mentioned in any of the extant descriptions of the College of a 
later date, it may be assumed that it was soon taken down, and the 
dates 1651-1660 are conjecturally assigned to it. 1 

Avenue), south of that the "College Land in the President's Improvement," 
at the west and southwest a gore labelled "College Land in M r Boardman's 
Improv*" and defined by the letters fhide, and a "Street" (now Holyoke Street) 
on the east (p. 302, below: see Plan I, facing p. 270, below). On February 22, 
1775, Andrew Bordman — who was the grandson of the Andrew Bordman who 
leased the land in 1704 or 1705 — acknowledged that he held of the College 
"that part of the above described rectangular House Lot which is contained 
within the Gore on the west side, as defined in the Plan foregoing Dy the Letters 
fhide, at the rent of two Shillings lawful money p r Annumn" (p. 303, below). 
Four years later "The College came to a new Agreement with M r Boardman 
for the above Gore of Land" (p. 303, below); and on March 8, 1779, he acknowl- 
edged that "I hold of the President & Fellows of Harvard College the Gore of 
Land belonging to a House Lot opposite the Presidents House [Wadsworth 
House], as described in the foregoing Page, for which I promise to pay annually 
while in my Occupation one Spanish mill'd Dollar " (p. 303, below). 

Thus, whether we start with the Bradish lot, which in 1654 was stated to lie 
"before the Colledge;" or with the land leased to Andrew Bordman in 1704 
or 1705 "lying neare w r y e old College stood;" or with President Langdon's map 
of 1774 or 1775; or with the acknowledgments made by the younger Andrew 
Bordman in 1775 and 1779 — in each case the result arrived at is the same, 
namely, that the first Harvard College stood on the Eaton lot. And so James 
Winthrop's statement of 1801 that the first Harvard College was built "a little 
south of its present site" is corroborated. 

1 There is, however, a curious reference to it by Sewall, who on July 31, 1675, 
wrote: 

This said Saturday night, in a dream, I fancyed myself to have Mrs. Richard- 
son's child in my arms, and herself following me up a pair of stairs going to 
heaven, all sorrowfull and weeping. I went up innumerable steps and still saw 
nothing, so that I was discouraged, . . . Yet I strengthened myself, as well 
as I could, considering how apt things only heard of are to be doubted (if diffi- 
cultly obtained and not of long time) though they be never so true. Thus think- 
ing, I went on; at last I came to a fair chamber with goodly lodgings. When 
I saw that was all, I earnestly prayed that God would help us, or else we should 
never get to our journey's end. Amazed I was, not being able to conceive how 
furniture should be brought up those stairs. Afterward it was a chamber in the 
N. Building, after, part of an old (Goff, as I take it) that joined to it, of the 
same height. A scollar told me that those things were drawn up by a pully, 
and so took in at a window which was all ramshacled like that in Goff Colledge 
over the Fellows' chamber, and all things began to seem more vile. Herabout 
I waked, being much troubled at the former part, and much wondring at the 
latter of my dream. (Diary, i. 10.) 

Goffe's College was a considerable distance from "the N. Building" — that 
is, the new building or the second Harvard College. On the other hand the second 
President's House, the one built by Dunster, was probably very close to the 



lxxxii INTRODUCTION 

The exact location of Goffe's College was not known until De- 
cember 6, 1909, when, in making excavations for the subway, its 
foundation walls were uncovered. It stood a little to the south and 
to the west of Wadsworth House. See the plan facing page lxviii. 

Indian College (1655-1698) 

In September, 1653, the "Commissioners for the Massachusetts" 
were desired to "order the building of one Intyre Rome att the 
College for the Conveniencye of six hopfull Indians youthes to bee 
trained vp there . . . which Rome may be two storyes high and 
built plaine but strong and durable;" 1 but in September, 1654, it 
was left to the Commissioners " to giue order for the finishing of the 
building att the Colledge and to alter the forme agreed vpon att 
the last meeting att Boston as is desired by the p r sedent of the 
Colledge provided it exceed not thirty foot in length and twenty in 
breadth." 2 

This building, called the Indian College, is not mentioned by 
name in the inventory of December 10, 1654, but is perhaps referred 
to in the fourth entry as " One small house unfinished, intended for a 
printing house." 3 In September, 1656, the Commissioners, in reply 
to President Chauncy's request "To make vse of the Indian Build- 
ings," said that they were willing that he "may for one year next 
ensuing Improue the said building to acomodate some English 
students provided the said building bee by the Corporation cecured 
from any dammage that may befall the same through the vse 
therof;" 4 and in September, 1657, they accorded "the like libertie 
for one yeare to make vse of the Indian buildings vpon the same 
Consideration as was graunted last yeare." 5 In 1665, Colonel 
George Cartwright, one of the Royal Commissioners, wrote: 

second Harvard College; and the third President's House, built in 1680 and 
taken down in 1719, was on or near the site of Massachusetts Hall, and so was 
near the second Harvard College. Obviously such a rigmarole cannot be taken 
seriously, yet it would seem to indicate that Goffe's College might have been 
still in existence as late as Sewall's day. Sewall, who graduated in 1671, had 
himself been a Fellow in 1673-1674 and Librarian in 1674. 

1 Plymouth Colony Records, x. 107. 

2 x. 128. 

3 P. 20S, below. If the "small house unfinished" was not the Indian College, 
it is impossible to say what it was. 

4 Plymouth Colony Records, x. 1C8. 6 x. 190. 



INDIAN COLLEGE, 1655-1698 lxxxiii 

At Cambridge they haue a small colledge, (made of wood) for the 
English; and a small brick pile for the indians, where there was but one; 
one was lately dead, & 3, or 4 more they had at schole, as they sayd. It 
may be feared that this colledge may furnish as many scismaticks to the 
church, and the Corporation as many rebelles to the King, as formerly 
they haue donne, if not timely prevented. 1 

It was more fully described by Daniel Gookin in 1674 : 

One thing falls in here fitly to be spoken of, as a means intended for 
the good of the Indians; which was the erecting a house of brick at Cam- 
bridge in New-England, which passeth under the name of the Indian 
college. It is a structure strong and substantial, though not very capa- 
cious. It cost between three or four hundred pounds. It is large enough 
to receive and accommodate about twenty scholars with convenient 
lodgings and studies; but not hitherto hath been much improved for 
the ends intended, by reason of the death and failing of Indian scholars. 
It hath hitherto been principally improved for to accommodate English 
scholars, and for placing and using a printing press belonging to the col- 
lege. This house was built and finished at the charge, and by the ap- 
pointment, of the Honorable Corporation for propagating the gospel in 
New-England. 2 

On November 6, 1693, the Corporation voted "That y e Jndian 
Colledge be taken down, provided the Charges of taking it down 
amount not to more then five pounds." 3 On September 19, 1695, 
the following action was taken by the Commissioners for Propa- 
gating the Gospel among the Indians: 

Whereas the President & Fellows of y e Colledge Jn Cambridge have 
Proposed & Desired that y e Bricks belonging to y e Jndian Colledge w ch 
is gone to decay & become altogether Uselesse may be Removed & Used 
for an Additional Building to Harvard Colledge, We do Hereby signifye 
to y e Corporation our Consent to their Proposall; Provided that in case 
any Jndians should hereafter be sent to y e Colledge, they should enjoy 
their Studies rent free in said building. 4 

On April 7, 1698, the Corporation ordered "that the Bricks of y e old 
Jndian Colledg be sold to M r Willis, he allowing for them 20**." 5 
And in the following month Sewall wrote: "In the beginning of this 



1 Collections New York Historical Society for 1869, p. 87. 

2 1 Massachusetts Historical Collections, i. 176. 

3 P. 346, below. * P. 352, below. 5 P. 358, below. 



lxxxiv INTRODUCTION 

Moneth of May, the old Brick Colledge, comonly called the Indian 
Colledge, is pull'd down to the ground, being sold to Mr. Willis the 
builder of Mr. Stoughtons colledge." 1 

The exact location of the Indian College is not known. In 1848 
Mr. Samuel A. Eliot placed it a little north of Wadsworth House. 
In an article printed in July, 1871, Thomas C. Amory wrote: 

Farther along back of the spot whence Dane was lately moved, and 
where Matthews Hall is building, long stood the Indian College, . . . 
When a few weeks ago the foundations were being laid for Matthews 
Hall on a line with Hollis and Stoughton, but to the south of Massa- 
chusetts, a line of ancient wall was unearthed, supposed to have once 
formed part of it. 2 

In his earlier papers, Mr. Davis was disposed to accept the site 
indicated by Mr. Eliot in 1848, but in his final paper, written in 
1893, Mr. Davis said: 

On the plan in Eliot's history of the College, a conjectural site for the 
Indian College is marked within the limits of the Eaton lot. No state- 
ment is given why this spot was selected, but it is probably based upon 
the existence of the debris of some old building in that neighborhood, or 
upon a tradition to that effect. It is not unlikely that we have here an 
unintentional hint of the site of the first College building. . . . 

All positive knowledge of its site has been lost, but two places within 
the Yard have been conjecturally assigned to it. The first, the site in- 
dicated upon Eliot's plan, has already been alluded to. I have intimated 
that the site referred to may perhaps have been that of the first College 
building itself. The other was based upon the discovery of debris when 
the cellar of Matthews was excavated. President Eliot is authority for 
the statement that the bricks and pieces of stone thrown up at that 
time were not in the form of a foundation wall. It is not probable that 
the Indian College had any cellar, and inasmuch as the bricks of which 
it was constructed were removed, there could not have remained any 
substantial signs to mark the site of the building. It seems to me, 
therefore, quite possible that the conjecture which attributes these 
relics to the Indian College may be correct. If so, we have on the one 
hand a probable site for the first College building on the Eaton lot, 
somewhere, perhaps, within the limits of Grays, and on the other hand, 



1 Diary, i. 4S0. See also p. xciv, below. 

1 New England Historical and Genealogical Register, xxv. 227. 



SECOND HARVAKD COLLEGE, 1677-1764 lxxxv 

a site assigned for the Indian College, on the Goffe lot, within the limits 
of Matthews. 1 

The approximate location of the Indian College is indicated on 
the plan facing page lxviii. 

Second Harvard College (1677-1764) 

On September 12, 1671, the Council issued an order "to promote 
a generall contribution for building a new Colledge at Cambridge, 
of brick or stone, as an addition unto Harvard Colledge ;" 2 on May 
15, 1672, the General Court ordered that "the ouerseers of the 
colledge shall manage the contributions giuen towards the reeedifying 
Harvard Colledge, so that the end aymed at maybe attayned in all 



1 Harvard Graduates' Magazine, i. 367-368, 374. 

2 P. 220, below. It was stated in 1881 that the first Harvard College "was 
built of wood, and in 1669 had shown such signs of decay that subscriptions 
were opened in many places for funds to build a new one" (1 Proceedings Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, xviii. 320). This statement was based on Sibley's 
remark that "When the general appeal was made for funds to erect a brick 
building for the College in place of the wooden structure, which was small and 
decaying, the following response . . . came from Portsmouth," New Hampshire 
(Harvard Graduates, i. 367). But in the document itself, dated May 20, 1669, 
the signers say that "wee haue made a collection in our toune of sixty pounds 
anmi, (& hope to make it more,) which sajd sume is to be pajd annually for these 
seuen yeares ensuing, to be improoued, at the discretion of the honoured ouer- 
seers of the colledge, for the behoofe of the same, and the advancment of good 
literature" (i. 368), and there is no allusion to a new building. Indeed, on June 3, 
1669, the Overseers disposed of the gift by assigning £34 to the three Fellows 
and "the Remainder to be for the Encouragem* of Schollars as the Overseers 
shall see meet to order" (p. 219, below). What is perhaps the earliest allusion 
to the proposed new building occurs in a letter dated Boston, August 21, 1671, 
signed by nine ministers (among them President Chauncy) and seven magis- 
trates, to certain ministers in London: "The ruinous, & allmost irreparable state 
of the Edifices, in conjunction with our inability to erect some other more ca- 
pacious, & accomodate; This notwithstanding, upon a serious, & late debate, a 
new structure, of stone, or brick, is resolved upon, & that speedy preparations 
shall be made toward the same: The Countrey (we hope) may be enabled to 
contribute about a thousand pound," etc. (our Publications, xi. 339). For the 
amount actually received, see pp. 222-223, below. In his election sermon de- 
livered May 15, 1672, Thomas Shepard said: "Let the Schools flourish . . . 
Cherish them therefore, and the Colledge in special: and accordingly that there 
•may be a seasonable (while affections are warm) and a faithful improvement 
of the Contribution for the New Edifice there, and what else is needful for the 
encouragement and advancement of Learning in that precious Society" (Eye- 
Salve, 1673, p. 45). 



lxxxvi INTRODUCTION 

respects;" ' on June 20, 1672, the Overseers chose John Cooper and 
William Manning "to be Agents & Stewards to mannage that 
work," and, in addition, appointed Deputy Governor Leverett, 
Daniel Gookin, Thomas Danforth, William Stoughton, the Rev. 
John Sherman, and the Rev. Urian Oakes, "to be a Comittee for 
the Overseers, unto whom the Stewards . . . may have recourse 
and receive ord r s and directions from them or any four of them." 2 
On September 9, 1672, the Commissioners of the United Colonies 
wrote that though the College — 

doth att p r sent labour vnder sundry discurragements p r tely ariseing by 
the death of theire late Presedent, and alsoe by the decay of theire build- 
ings which were made in our Infancye, yett now are in a hopefull way 
to be againe supplyed with an able Presedent, and alsoe with a New 
building of bricke and stone for the effecting wherof there is alredy a 
contribution made according to our low condition. 3 

Progress on the new building was slow, and nearly two years 
went by before the frame was raised. On August 7, 1674, Sewall 
wrote: 

New Coiledge raised. John Francis helping about raising of the 
new Coiledge had his right legg (both bones) broke a little above 
his anckle, and his left thigh about 4 inches below the joint, by a 
peece that fell on him, and had like to have killed several others yet 
hurt none. 4 

This building, at first called New College, was, after the demo- 
lition of the first Harvard College, also called Harvard College. On 
July 6, 1676, Daniel Gookin, one of the Fellows, was paid 4s 6d 
for "removing Bookes," and on August 31 a further sum of £2.10.0 
"in satisfaction for his paines in removing the library to the new 

1 Massachusetts Colony Records, vol. iv. pt. ii. p. 516. 

2 Pp. 220, 221, below. 

3 Plymouth Colony Records, x. 355. "Theire late Presedent" was Charles 
Chauncy. 

4 Diary, i. 5. On October 15, 1679, John Francis, "in consideration of a 
Wound he had received in building Harvard College," was granted "one hundred 
acres of land where it is to be found free from former grants," but the grant 
was not laid out until 1716: see Massachusetts Colony Records, v. 255; Massa- 
chusetts Archives, lviii. 101; Massachusetts Province Laws, ix. 473, 508; Massa- 
chusetts House Journal, June 8, 15, November 16, December 1, 1716, pp. 10, 16, 
41, 52. 



SECOND HARVARD COLLEGE, 1677-1764 lxxXVU 

Colledge & placeing them." 1 On October 12, 1676, Edward Ran- 
dolph thus described the building : 

There are three colledges built in Cambridge, one with timber at 
the charge of Mr. Harvard and bears his name; a small brick building 
called the Indian colledge, where some few Indians did study, but now 
it is a printing house; new-colledge, built at the publick charge, is a fair 
pile of brick building covered with tiles, by reason of the late Indian 
warre not yet finished. It contains twenty chambers for students, two 
in a chamber; a large hall, which serves for a chappel; over that a con- 
venient library with some few bookes of the ancient fathers and school 
divines, but in regard divinity is the generall study, there are many 
English bookes of the late non-conformist writers, especially of Mr. 
Baxter and Dr. Owen. 2 

On May 23, 1677, Edward Rawson, on behalf of the General 
Court, wrote: 

The necessity of the case presseth vs to write these lines to excite & 
stirr vp the . . . inhabitants of Ipsuich, &c, to joyne yo r helping hands 
in a free contribution for finishing the new bricke colledge at Cambridge, 
w ch being begvnn about two yeares since, and advanced in a good meas- 
ure, but during the warre hath stood at stay for want of mony to finish 
it; but now the old colledge being fallen doune, a part of it, and thereby 
rendered not habitable, and the new colledge is like to suffer much 
damage if it be not speedily finished, these considerations vrge vs to 
desire yow will . . . speedily collect what the Lord doth incljne the 
hearts of the good people of yo r toune to contribute for this good & 
publicke worke. 3 



1 Treasurer Richards's Book. On November 1, 1677, Ammi R. Corlet, a 
Fellow, was paid five shillings "for washing & sweeping the library in new Col- 
ledge" (id.). On August 23, 1679, £1.16.0. was paid to John Palfrey "on the 
president's note for 1 doz. Stooles for Colledge Library" (id.). On October 14, 
1679, Daniel Gookin was paid "3s. money Sweepeing Colledge pr Rob* browne 
for 1 year expiring Sept. last" (id.). On April 8, 1695, the Corporation voted that 
"six leather Chairs be forthwith provided for y e Use of y e Library, & six more 
before y e Commencement in Case y e Treasury will allow of it" (p. 350, below). 
For Treasurer Richards's Book, see p. xxviii note 1, above. 

2 In T. Hutchinson, Collection of Original Papers (1769), p. 501. 

3 Massachusetts Colony Records, v. 143-144. The Spencer lot (see the 
plan facing p. lxviii, above) was bought by the College on June 12, 1697, from 
Michael Spencer (Middlesex Deeds, xii. 80-82), who had previously bought it 
from Thomas Sweetman (whose daughter Rebecca was the wife of Spencer) on 
December 10, 1677 (id. viii. 287). In the latter deed of sale there is mention of 



lxxxviii INTRODUCTION 

On May 29, 1677, in a petition to the General Court, Manning and 
Cooper, the stewards of the building, said that they had — 

brought the building on so farr as that the outside worke is for the most 
part finished & the liberrary compleatly finished & one chamber, all the 
rest of the house, for the present vselese, the most of the floores wants 
boards, 3 cases of holppacte staires to bee made that will not be done 
with a little cost, & the greatest part of the house to plaister & siele 
with Inside, . . . the old Colledge is part of it (besides the turret) 
fallen down, & mens eyes generally vpon vs to get the new building 
finished, but wee haue not wherewithall. 1 

Writing apparently in 1679 or 1680, William Hubbard said: 

In the year 1672, Harvard College being decayed, a liberal contribu- 
tion was granted for rebuilding the same, which was so far promoted 
from that time, that in the year 1677, a fair and stately edifice of brick 
was erected anew, not far from the place where the former stood, and so 
far finished that the publick acts of the commencement were there per- 
formed, over which God send or confirm and continue a president, for 
the carrying on of that hopeful work, that so the glory of the succeeding 
may in all respects equal and exceed that of the former generation. 2 



the " garden next the new Colledge." On April 28, 1712, the Corporation voted 
" That the Orchard purchased of Michael Spencer & lately fenced, be assign'd for 
a place of recreation & exercise for the Scholars " (p. 401, below). On April 19, 
1737, the Corporation voted " That the Northerly part of the Land improved by 
the Late President [Wadsworth] and that adjoynes to the playing pasture for the 
Schollars be Layd open to the said playing pasture for the Enlargment of the 
same" (p. 656, below). 

1 2 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, ix. 100-101. 

2 2 Massachusetts Historical Collections, vi. 610. Hubbard, it will be ob- 
served, stated that the new building was erected "not far from the place where 
the former stood." This passage makes it possible to assign an approximate 
date to the demolition of the first Harvard College. It was still standing, or at 
least in part, in May, 1677, and it had disappeared when Hubbard wrote. His 
Generall History of New England, though not published until 1815, was appar- 
ently practically finished in 1680, for on June 11 in that year the General Court 
appointed a committee "to peruse" the work and "make returne of their opinion 
thereof to the next session, that the Court may then, as they shall then judge 
meete, take order for the impression thereof" (Massachusetts Colony Records, 
V. 279); and on October 11, 1682, the Court granted Hubbard £50, "he tran- 
scribing" his History "fairely into a booke, that it maybe the moreeasely pervsed, 
in order to the satisfaction of this Court" (v. 378, 394). The passage quoted 
in the text expresses the hope that God would "send or confirm and continue 
a President, for the carrying on of that hopeful work." This would seem to be 
a clear reference to Urian Oakes, who, though he had been Acting President from 



SECOND HARVAKD COLLEGE, 1677-1764 lxxxix 

On December 24, 1691, the Corporation ordered that "the top 
of y e Colledge be guarded w th Ballisters with all Convenient speed." * 
On August 4, 1701, the Corporation voted that "M r Willis be desired 
to veiw the old Colledg and to Jnform the Corporation w* is Neces- 
sary for repairing said Colledg." 2 On August 7, 1707, it and Stough- 
ton College were placed in charge of the Scholars of the House, 3 
"Each one quarterly [to] render an account to the president or 
Tutors of what Damage, & by whome has happen'd." 4 On July 9, 
1712, the Overseers appointed a committee "to survey the Roof 



April 7, 1675, did not actually become President until February 9, 1680. Hence 
the passage was presumably written between May, 1677, and February 9, 1680, 
and the demolition of the first Harvard College may be conjecturally assigned to 
1679. 

1 P. 832, below. 

2 P. 367, below. 

3 Throughout the period covered in these volumes, the term "the House" 
was frequently used in a sense that has long been obsolete — namely, meaning 
the institution. Thus in the College Laws of 1642-1646 penalties were inflicted 
"If any Scholar shall transgresse any of ye Lawes of God or the House out of 
perversnesse or apparant negligence" (p. 27, below), where the words "ye Lawes 
of God or the House" translate the Latin "Dei et hujus Collegij Legem" (p. 31, 
below). In 1650 it was ordered that the Butler or Cook shall not "suffer any 
Schollar or Schollars whatever except the ffellows, Masters of Art, ffellow Com- 
moners or Officers of the house to come into the Butteryes or Kitchin save w th 
their Parents or Guardians, or w th some grave & sober strangers" (p. 34, below). 
In 1712 Addington Davenport, "A Son of the House" — he had graduated in 
1689 — was admitted Master of Arts (p. 402, below). In 1741 the Corporation 
told William Shirley "that (as the Governour of this Province) You are the 
first Overseer of that house" (p. 709). In 1743 Colin Campbell of Jamaica was 
thanked "for his Generosity to this House, in giving" certain mathematical and 
astronomical instruments (p. 744, below). For other examples of this use, see 
the index under "House." 

The term "Scholar of the House" soon arose, and in 1667 the duties of the 
office, to which a small salary was attached, were thus defined: "The Schollars 
of the house shall take a strict Account of all the Buildings, Chambers, Studyes 
&, fences, belonging to the Colledge & shall give an account quarterly to the 
Treasurer w* dammage the Colledge hath susteyned in any of the aforementioned 
p r ticulars & by whom" (p. 204, below). At first resident graduates and under- 
graduates were appointed to this office, but an entry in the Corporation meeting 
of September 6, 1742, reads: "Mem° for Next Year, Not convenient (on acc° of 
their absence in the Spring) to have Sen r Sophisters Scholars of the House" 
(p. 728, below). 

For the occasional application of the word "House" to a building, see p. cxxx 
note, below). 

4 P. 378, below. 



XC INTRODUCTION 

of Harvard College, to report the state of it, and their Iudgm* for 
the best Methods for it's reparation;" 1 and on July 25 the com- 
mittee reported that "the best way is to take off the roof & to raise a 
third Story upright in stead of the two Storys w ch are now under 
y e roof, w th a flat roof well shingled; with a Coving or Mondillions 
on each Side of it, & a battlem* of Brick at each End." 2 On April 7, 
1713, the Corporation desired the President and resident Fellows to 
procure " a new Survey of both the Colleges, and consider what may 
be thot necessary for a present repair." 3 The committee procured 
three carpenters "to make a New Survey of the Two Colleges," 
who on the 11th or 18th reported that "for the Repair of the Gutters 
& putting on a New Coat of Shingls and puting y e whole roofe into 
such a state as shall last tight and good for a good Number of years," 
the cost would be £96.5.0, and £50 more "for repair of the stairs of 
y e house, Windows, doors & all oy r necessary repairs;" but that "If 
the roofe be taken off and the House repair d in the way, in w ch the 
former Comittee directed It wil not be don under £450 allowing the 
benefit of the Materials of the Old roof." 4 On the 23rd President 
Leverett "waited on" Governor Dudley at the latter's house and 
presented him with the report of the committee, and on May 4 he 
again saw Dudley, who "was pleased to Advise to y e proceeding 
to repair the Old Coll: without taking off the roof. M r Secretary 
& M r Comissary Gen 1 were of the same opinion." 5 On May 6 
Dudley, Lieutenant-Governor Tailer, Commissary Belcher, "with 
sundry Gentlm of the late Gen 1 Assembly," visited Leverett, and — 

After dinner his Excy enter'd on the Discourse of repairing y e College, 
and Concluded with the Opinion of the Gentlm then present upon read- 
ing the Last Survey of the buildings, that it w d be most prud fc to proceed 
upon the repair as before. Onely the L* Gov r pposed an Alteracon of 
the g fc Stair-case, and the Entry, w ch was agreed to be necessary, but the 
Contriv c Left to more mature deliberaton. 6 



1 P. 403, below. 

2 P. 404, below. On the same day (July 25, 1712) Sewall "Went to Cambridge 
in the Castle Barge with the L 4 Gov 1 " ... to a Corporation Meeting," and 
recorded that the committee "view'd the Roof of the Colledge which S. Andrews 
built, and judg'd it necessary to be taken down, by reason of the Rain and Rot- 
tenness the Gable-Ends had convcy'd to the Timbers" (Diary, iii. 357). 

s P. 408, below. 

* Leverett's Diary-, p. 73. 5 Pp. 74, 75. 6 P. 75. 



SECOND HARVARD COLLEGE, 1677-1764 xd 

On May 12 President Leverett wrote: 

M r Cleeveland 1 told me he had the day before bin at Saw-mills at 
Oburn to direct for y e Sawing of Timbers needf. for the repairs and had 
Secur'd a Suitable Quantity of Pitch-Pine Boards for the Stairs. And 
that He was proceeding to Brantry, Waymo th and if needf. to Hingham 
to direct making Sizable & Suitable Shingles, and according proceeded 
the Same day. 

On the Same day M r Treasurer Brattle gave us a Visit to whom we 
Comunicate what is above, who approved of the Proceeding and gave 
his thoughts much the Same he had writ a few days before to y e Presid*. 2 

On June 28, 1720, the Corporation voted — 

That the College Hall be Cieled under the Ioyst, The floor new laid, 
and further necessary Conveniency made therin for the Orderly and 
Decent reception of the Stud ts , in the time of Worship & meal-times. 
And that the Library be Cieled under the Ioyst, & that further don 
therto that shalbe thot necessary by the Presid* and Fellows of the 
Corporation residing in Cambridge to preserve the Books from Damage. 3 

On October 5, 1723, the Corporation voted "That the Two Lower 
Norwest Chambers in the Old College be fitted up in Such a Manner, 
as that either of 'em may be Suitable to entert n a Tut r ." 4 On 
September 9, 1724, Tutor Flynt and Steward Bordman were ordered 
"to procure Spouts and Gutters or what shal be most Convenient 
for the North Side of the Old College to prevent further Damage to 
the College by Weather," etc. 5 On May 21, 1750, order was given 
as to "Glazing Work." 6 

More than once the building was in danger of destruction by fire. 
On July 10, 1682, Noadiah Russell, then a resident graduate, de- 



1 Aaron Cleveland was one of the three carpenters. 

8 Leverett's Diary, pp. 75-76. 

8 P. 452, below. 

4 P. 502, below. On April 20, 1724, the Corporation voted "that 'twill very 
much Conduce to the good order of the College, that a Tut r inhabit one of the 
Norwest Rooms of the Old College, and that it be pposed to M r Prince to View 
the two Lower Rooms in that Quarter of the s d College, and choose w ch of 'em 
wilbe most agreeable to him, and that the Room be prepared for his Reception 
accordingly" (p. 506, below). On August 11, 1724, the Corporation voted that 
"the Lower Chamber in the North west Comer of the Old College be assigned 
to M r Monis for the managing of his Hebrew .Instructions" (p. 512, below). 

6 P. 513, below. 

6 P. 818, below. 



XC11 INTRODUCTION 

scribed what, so far as is known, was the first fire in the history of 
the College: 

At night about 10 of ye clock ye end of a candle being carelessly 
thrown into my chimney with bows in it fired ye bows and flared out of 
ye top of ye chimney, ye first person yt saw it (being in a fright) pulled 
ye bows into ye middle of ye floore where they blazed and ye windows 
and doore being shut, immediately filled the chamber w th smoak and 
had almost fired the upper floor but ye small bows being not capable of 
holding fire long soon went out (ye scollars bringing up water ) 

only ye heat of ye fire set ye mantle tree on fire w ch being taken notice 
of was also easily extinguished but not without pulling down a shelf 
and severall boards which are nailed over ye mantle. Moreover the 
funnels of ye chimnies passing out into one sheeit set ye kitchen chimney 
on fire w ch being foul burned a pretty space and great gobs of fire came 
out and ligh't upon the College but the Rooff being wetted and scholars 
standing w th water to extinguish it was easily secured. 1 

Twenty years later Cotton Mather, presumably referring to the 
same fire, explained the chief cause of the preservation of the build- 
ing. Alluding to President Rogers, he said: 

It was his Custom to be somewhat Long in his Daily Prayers (which 
our Presidents used to make) with the Scholars in the Colledge-Hall. 
But one Day, without being able to give Reason for it, he was not so 
Long, it may be by Half as he used to be. Heaven knew the Reason! 
The Scholars returning to their Chambers, found one of them on Fire, 
and the fire proceeded so far, that if the Devotions had held three Min- 
utes longer, the Colledge had been irrecoverably laid in Ashes, which 
now was happily preserved. 2 

In 1704 the building was again threatened: 

Cambridge, Octob. 29. About 1 of the Clock in the morning there hap- 
pened a Fire in Harvard Colledge occasioned by a foul Chimney which 
took fire, and the soot being blown into the Belfrey, fired some old 



1 New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vii. 55. It is not quite 
clear whether Russell's chamber was in the second Harvard College or in a 
building close to it. If the latter, perhaps the third President's House (1680- 
1719), which apparently was near the second Harvard College, is referred to, for 
it was by no means uncommon for a student (undergraduate or graduate) to 
live in the President's House: see p. cxiii note 6, below. 

2 Magnalia (1702), bk. iv. pt. i. § 5, p. 130. 



i 



SECOND HARVARD COLLEGE, 1677-1764 XClii 

Boards, and melted the Lead (wherewith the Colledge was covered 1 ) 
and then Fired the Planks; but one of the Tutors having the Key of the 
Scuttle which was lockt and barr'd was absent, wherefore 2 of the Stu- 
dents putting their backs to the Scuttle, forced it open, and threw water 
briskly, so that they quickly extinguisht the Fire, which otherwise had 
been of very ill consequence. 2 

On September 24, 1748, John Holyoke, an undergraduate, wrote: 
"Coll: on fire yesterday." 3 Finally, on the night of January 24, 
1764, the building with practically all its contents, including the bell 
given by John Willet, 4 succumbed to the flames. It was the oldest 
of the three buildings depicted in William Burgis's "A Prospect of 
the Colledges in Cambridge in New England," which, published in 
1726, was the earliest view of the College buildings: 5 see the frontis- 



1 On April 11, 1732, owing to the fact that "there has of late been a con- 
siderable Quantity of Lead cut off from y e top of y e old College, to y e great 
Detriment of the said House," the Corporation voted that "y e Door leading up 
to y e top of said College, be locked," that "if any scholar be found on y e top of 
y e said College without Leave ... he shall be liable to y e penalty of five shil- 
lings," and that "if any scholar shall presume to cut off any Lead from y e said 
College, he shall suffer a fine of ten shillings, and satisfy for all Damages" (p. 598, 
below). This vote was embodied in the College Laws of 1734 (p. 144, below). 

2 Boston News Letter, November 6, 1704, p. 2/2. 

3 Holyoke Diaries (1911), p. 46. 

4 "The College Bell also is gone," wrote Mrs. Mascarene on January 30, 1764 
(our Publications, xiv. 4 note). See Mr. F. Apthorp Foster's paper on "The Burn- 
ing of Harvard Hall, 1764, and its Consequences," in our Publications, xiv. 2-43. 

5 The following advertisement appeared in the Boston News Letter of July 14, 
1726, p. 2/2: 

TJHIS Day is Published a Prospect of the Colledges in Cambridge in New 
England, curiously Engraven in Copper; and are to be sold at Mr. Price's 
Print-seller, over against the Town-House, Mr. Randal Jappaner in Ann-Street, 
by Mr. Stedman in Cambridge, and the Book-sellers of Boston. 

This was repeated, with the change of "This Day is Published" to "Lately 
Published," in the same paper of July 21 (p. 2/2) and July 28 (p. 2/2), 1726. 
It was dedicated "To the Honourable William Dummer Esq r Lieutenant Gov- 
ernour of y e Province of the Massachusets Bay," who, in the absence of Governor 
Shute in England, was at the time Acting Governor. In 1743 the print was 
reissued by William Price, dedicated to Lieutenant-Governor Spencer Phips 
and with a legend (reprinted in 1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, 
xviii. 318-319) giving a brief history of the College. "To be sold by William 
Price, at the Looking-Glass and Picture Shop in Cornhill, near the Town-House, 
A new Prospect of Boston, . . . and Prospect of the Colleges in Cambridge, 
New-England 11 (Boston Evening Post, September 12, 1743, p. 2/2, and October 3, 
p. 2/2). 



XC1V INTRODUCTION 

piece to this volume. It was "42 feet broad, 97 long, and four 
stories high." l In 1788 it was thus described: 

On the lower floor, in the middle, was a hall, which served as a dining- 
room for the students, and a lecture-room for the professors; and till the 
chapel 2 was built, as a place for the daily devotions of the college. Over 
it was the library, and at the west end an apparatus chamber for the 
professor of natural philosophy. The other apartments were the kitchen, 
buttery, and about twenty lodging chambers, some of which, in the 
upper stories, were inconvenient on account of the form in which the 
roof was constructed. 3 

From its ashes there soon arose on the same site the third Harvard 
College (the present Harvard Hall), built at the expense of the 
Province, in regard to which, as it lies outside the period covered by 
these volumes, it is sufficient to say here that it contained no chambers 
for students. 4 

Stoughton College (1699-1781) 

On March 3, 1698, the Corporation appointed a committee of 
three "to treat w th The Honourable Liev 1 Govern 1 about y e addi- 
tional building to y e Colledg, of w ch his Hono r has made som Pro- 
posals to y e Corporation." 5 On May 12 it ordered that "a cellar 
shall be made in y e new building designed for y e Colledge by y e 
Honourable Liev* Govern 1 " at y e Charge of y e Colledge." 6 Under 
date of December 14 is this entry: 

Cash paid m r Thos. Willis 10* in full, (with the Bricks &c of the old 
Indian Colledge Sold him last April by Act of y e Corporacon for 20* bs ) 
for making a cellar under y e Southerly end of the new building, unless 
y e Corporacon shall see meet to allow y m anything further on y* acco* as 
p s d Willis's receipt. 7 



1 Boston News Letter, February 2, 1764, p. 2/1. 
1 Iloldcn Chapel. 

3 Columbian Magazine, ii. 673. An interesting description of the building 
and of college life in 1759-1763 by Timothy Pickering will be found in his Life 
(1867), i. 9-12 note. 

4 For a "Plan of Harvard Hall built in 1764," the "South Front of Harvard 
Hall at Cambridge in New England," and a "View of Harvard College about 
1764," all by Du Simitiere, see our Publications, xvii. 16, 42, 66. 

* Pp. 357-358, below. 

« P. 360, below. 

7 Treasurer Brattle's Book, p. 55. 



STOUGHTON COLLEGE, 1699-1781 XCV 

In 1699 Thomas Danforth bequeathed to the College three tene- 
ments in Framingham on certain conditions, one being "That y e 
annual Rents thereof shall be for y e support of such Student as shall 
from time to time use & Improve one of the studies in y e new lodg- 
ings erected by M r Stoughton." x On May 6, 1700, the Corporation 
ordered Treasurer Brattle to pay Willis £10 "in ful for what is due 
to him for work done in the Cellar of the New Colledg," and further 
that "the Schollars who are Accommodated w th Cellars in the New 
Colledg shal Each of them allow to the Colledg 6 shillings" per 
annum, "Cellars belonging to the Tut r s Excepted." 2 On May 13 
Treasurer Brattle made this entry: 

Cash p d m r Tho. Willis in full of his Acco* for making a cellar under 
y e Southerly end of m r Stoughtons Colledg & for making divisions in s d 
cellar, 10 ib, voted y* I should pay him in full for y e same, as p his re- 
ceipt under his Acco* £10.0.0. 3 

On August 6, 1707, the building was placed in charge of the 
Scholars of the House. 4 On August 30, 1708, the Corporation voted 
that "the Chamber called the painted Chamber in the Honourable 
M r Stoughton's house, be reserved for the Use of the near Relations 
of s d M r Stoughton residing at the Colledge." 5 On April 10, 1710, 
the Corporation voted — 

That wheras the Slate roof on Stoughton Colledg proves defective 
and upon a Survey Thereof its judged more Convenient to Cover it with 
board and Shingle M r Treasurer is therefore desired to take Effectual 
Care for the taking of the said Slate roof and to cover it wth board and 
Shingle and to doe wt shal be further needful for the repaires of the said 
Colledg. 6 

On July 9, 1712, the Overseers appointed a committee to survey 
certain of the College buildings, and on the 25th the committee 
reported : 

1 Pp. 282, 842, below. Danforth's will was dated September 1, 1699, he died 
November 5, and the will was proved November 16 (Middlesex Probate Files, 
no. 5915); but it was not until October 21, 1724, that the Corporation was in- 
formed of the legacy (p. 515, below). 

2 Pp. 363-364, below. 

3 Treasurer Brattle's Book, p. 61. 

4 P. 378, below. 

5 P. 383, below, 
s P. 391, below. 



XCV1 INTRODUCTION 

As for Stoughton's-College, Wee gave in o r opinion this time two year 
of what we thought proper to be don — Or the roof of it may be taken 
off, & a flatt roof put upon it, & y e Chimneys lowred. 1 

On Sunday, October 26, 1712, Edward Holyoke, then a Tutor, 
wrote: "In prayer time after Meeting there broke out a fire in the 
northernmost part of the New College in the Second Story, which 
would have liked to consume the house." 2 

On April 7, 1713, the President and resident Fellows were desired 
to procure "a new Survey of both the Colleges, and consider what 
may be thot necessary for a present repair." 3 Accordingly a new 
survey was made by three carpenters, who on the 11th or 18th 
reported : 

Concerning the New College The s d Comittee are of Opinion, that the 
whole roof is to be taken of and to be boarded, and upon that shingles 
or slate as upon further consideration shalbe thought Convenient, of 
y e other Inside repairs they have had no Consideracon having bin con- 
sider'd by a former Comittee. 4 

On September 27, 1714, the President and resident Fellows were 
" impowered to repair the roof of Stoughton-College." 5 On Sep- 
tember 30 President Leverett made the following — 

Memorandum. That Deacon Barnard and M r Manly came to 
Cambr. to view the roof of Stoughton College, w ch w n they had don, 
they came over to the Presid ts , who went up w th them to M r Brattle's, 
where they gave their Opinion that the best repair w d be by boarding & 
shingling the s d roof, and that for Safety from fire, they were of opinion 
that a platform upon the Gables of the Chimney w d be a sufficient 
Security, and preferable to slating the house all things consider'd. 
Whereupn M r Flynt Comply 'd with this method, saying he c d offer 
nothing ag st it, M r Holieoke agreed also, and M r Brattle too. The 
Presid 1 having pposed this method from the first, and Comply 'd to the 
Inviting the above-mention'd psons onely for the satisfaction of the 
s d M r Flynt and M r Holioke. 6 

On April 4, 1721, a committee was appointed to take care that 
" a Cross Wall or Walls (as by the Skilfull shal be found necessary) be 



1 Pp. 403, 404, below. 2 Holyoke Diaries, p. 1. 

8 P. 408, below. « Leverett's Diary, pp. 73-74. 

6 P. 423, below. 6 Leverett's Diary, pp. 93-94. 



STOUGHTON COLLEGE, 1699-1781 XCvii 

built for the strenghtning of Stoughton-College and that the s d 
College be Clap-boarded on the East Side, and, if it be found needful, 
on the Northerly End also." * On May 2 the committee reported 
that "an Able Mason" had advised that the building was "so far 
bow'd that it could not be Secur'd as pposed, and that 'twas neces- 
sary to take it down;" and it was instructed to get certain masons 
and carpenters "to take a thoro View & Survey" and report "what 
they think is most Advisable to be don." 2 On June 21 a meeting 
of the Overseers was ordered to be called on the 23rd for "the rep- 
resenting the decay'd State of Stoughton House," 3 and on that 
day drew up a memorial to the General Assembly in which they 
represented — 

the desperate and Dangers Condition of Stoughton House, which, when 
they were pposing to have built up a Wall or Walls for the Support & 
Strenghtning thereof was found So exceedingly bow'd and broken, by 
Surveys one and again made by pper psons Skillfull in Such affairs, that 
'twas thot no pjection w d be effectual to Support it, but what w d be 
much more unpfitable, and a greater Damage then the taking down the 
s d House & rebuilding it, 

and entreated the Assembly "to do as Almighty God shall direct 
in an affair of so great Import as even the Lives as well as the 
Necessary accomodations of Sundry psons of Expectation and hopes 
are." 4 The memorial was presented to the House on the 24th, and 
was there read a second time on the 26th, 5 after which nothing further 
was heard of it. 

In 1722 Tutor Robie said that " Some on top of the New College 
took observations which differed slightly." 6 On June 2, 1725, the 
Corporation voted that " a New Well be dug and a pump put into 
it at the South East Corner of the yard to accomodate the Students 
in Stoughton & Massachusetts Colleges." 7 In a message to the 
Legislature on December 16, 1730, Governor Belcher said: 

1 P. 457, below. 

2 Pp. 458-459, below. 

3 P. 460, below. 

4 Leverett's Diary, pp. 194-195. 

6 Massachusetts House Journal, pp. 42, 43. 

6 Harvard Magazine (1864), x. 96. 

7 P. 522, below. Presumably this was the famous pump that used often to 
be blown up by the students and was finally removed some years ago. 



XCV111 INTRODUCTION 

When you consider what a diffusive Blessing the College at Cambridge 
has been to this Country in its Learning and Religion, and how much all 
the Estates among you have thereby been rais'd in their Value, and that 
while other Plantations are obliged to send their sons abroad for Educa- 
tion at a great Expence, and often to the Ruin of their Morals, we reap 
that Advantage at Home : I say, I hope these things will make you ready 
on all Occasions to Nourish and Cherish that Society. And what I 
would particularly point at, is the Complaint of the Sons of the Prophets, 
that they are straitned for Room. I am told that Stoughton College is 
gone much to Decay, and not without Danger of falling; I should be 
therefore glad that a Committee of this Court might be chosen to view 
it, and Report what may be proper to be done for the better Accommo- 
dation of the Students there. 1 

On May 21, 1750, order was given as to "Glazing Work." 2 The 
building is said to have been injured in the famous earthquake of 
1755, but in 1833 John Pickering stated that he had "been informed 
by a near relative, . . . who was in college at the time, that the 
walls of Stoughton Hall had then begun to settle and lean con- 
siderably; and that the shock of the earthquake restored them to 
their perpendicular direction." 3 The surprising thing is that a 
building so bowed in 1721 as to be condemned to demolition should 
have survived for another sixty years. On September 24, 1779, the 
Faculty, "To prevent the farther Destruction of the interior Part of 
Stoughton Hall," voted — 

That the College Carpenters be directed to take away all the Boards 
& Timbers in Stoughton Hall, that may be removed with safety to the 
Walls of s d Build 8 & secure s d Boards & Timbers in Holden Chapel, & 
then draw all the Nails that may be of Use, & reserve them for the 
Benefit of the College. 4 



1 Massachusetts House Journal, p. 116. 

2 P. 818, below. 

3 In Peirce, History, p. 71 note 1. On April 2, 1831, Paine Wingate wrote to 
Mr. Peirce: "I was at College at the time of the earthquake to which you refer, 
and believe the effects of it were as visible at Cambridge as in any part of the 
country; but I don't know that the injury done to Stoughton College at that 
time was greater than to brick buildings generally. ... I never supposed that 
the injury done to it by the earthquake was the cause of its being demolished" 
(p. 314). 

4 Faculty Records, iv. 116. 



STOUGHTON COLLEGE, 1699-1781 XC1X 

On September 29, 1781, action was again taken by the Faculty: 

Whereas great part of the back wall of Stoughton Hall has lately fallen 
down, so as to render the Chimneys dangerous to the lives of persons 
passing by; — Therefore — 

Voted — That the Chimneys be taken down immediately as far as 
the roof of the building, & that the state of the building be represented 
to the Corporation at their next meeting, for their further order. 1 

On October 2 the Overseers voted that "it be recommended to 
the Corporation to take order^ immediately respecting the decayed 
building of Stoughton Hall." 2 On the same day the Corpora- 
tion, "In conformity to a vote of the Hon ble & Rev d Board of 
Overseers," — 

Voted — That the immediate Government of the College be desired 
to dispose of Stoughton Hall as it now stands, on the best terms they 
can, to some person who will engage to remove it from the ground as 
soon as may be after the building shall be sold. 3 

On October 3 the Faculty, — 

Agreeable to the vote of the Rev d & Hon ble Corporation, impowering 
& directing the immediate Government of this University to make sale 
of Stoughton Hall on the best terms they can 

Voted — That the materials, except of Stone, of which Stoughton Hall 
is built be disposed of at public sale, on Thursday the 18 th instant at 
three of the clock afternoon; notice to be previously given by an adver- 
tisement in the Boston News-papers, by the Rev d Professor Williams. — 
And M r Winthrop is desired to take care of the business. 4 

Accordingly the following advertisement appeared in the Inde- 
pendent Chronicle of October 11 (page 2/2): 

ON Thursday the 18th inst. at the University of Cambridge, will be 
disposed of by Public Vendue, all the Materials, except the Stones, 
of which Stoughton Hall is built, the Building will be sold standing, and 
the Materials are to be removed by the Purchaser as soon as possible 
after the Sale. For Conditions of Sale, inquire of the Printer. 

By Order of the Corporation, 
Harvard-College, Octo. 3, 1781. S. Williams. 



1 Faculty Records, iv. 272. 2 Overseers' Records, iii. 226. 

3 College Book VIII. 103-104. 4 Faculty Records, iv. 273. 



C INTRODUCTION 

A memorandum added to the Corporation record of October 2 
states that "Stoughton Hall was purchased at public auction for 
the College." l What is perhaps the last reference to the build- 
ing is under date of November 13, 1781, when the Corporation 
voted — 

That Deacon Aaron Hill have liberty to take down the walls of Stough- 
ton Hall, and clean the Bricks, preserving for the use of the College one 
half of the Bricks, which he is carefully to pile up, leaving the corner 
stones, the stones in the cellar with Governor Stoughton's Arms, and 
the Inscription under it, & remove the Rubbish; & for his time & trouble 
to have the other half of the Bricks. 2 

Stoughton College was thus described in 1788: "It contained 
sixteen chambers for students, but no public apartments. Its length 
was one hundred, and its breadth twenty feet/' 3 But on a plan 
of a portion of the College Yard made by President Holyoke about 
1765, the length of the building is given as 97 feet and the breadth 
as 22 feet and 10 inches: see Plan H, facing page 260, below. 

Stoughton College stood west of the present University Hall, 
facing the present Johnston Gate, its northerly end close to the 
second Harvard College and its southerly end close to Massachusetts 
Hall. It was the second oldest of the three buildings depicted in 
1726 in Burgis's Prospect of the Colledges: see the frontispiece to 
this volume. In the Corporation vote of November 13, 1781, quoted 
above, there is mention of "the stones in the cellar with Gover- 
nor Stoughton's Arms, and the Inscription under it." These 
stones are plainly seen in Burgis's Prospect. The "following In- 
scription," wrote Dr. Andrew Eliot in 1773, "is on the Front of the 
Building:" 

DEO. OPT. MAX. BONISQ. UTERIS S. 

GULIELMUS STOUGHTON ARMIGER PROVINCES 

MASSACHUSET. NOV-ANGLORUM VICE-GUBERNATOR 

COLLEGII HARVARDINI OLIM ALUMNUS 

SEMPER PATRONUS FECIT 

ANNO DOMINI 1699 4 



1 College Book VIII. 104. 

2 College Book VIII. 104-105. 

3 Columbian Magazine, ii. 673. 

4 Donation Book, i. 175. Cf. Peirce, History, p. 71. 



MASSACHUSETTS HALL (BUILT 1720) ci 

Massachusetts Hall 

"It was in November, 1717/' writes Mr. Lane, "that the need 
for a new building to provide lodging for students first found public 
expression;" and "the first step toward obtaining a new building 
was taken on November 14, 1717, when at a meeting of the Overseers 
the President stated the difficulties of the situation, and moved that 
the Overseers would consider and advise what should be done." l 
President Leverett then read the draught of a memorial to the 
General Assembly he had prepared, which was approved and referred 
to a committee, by whom it was presented to Governor Shute on the 
15th. On May 22, 1720, the President was desired to acquaint the 
Overseers that "the New College is near Finish'd." 2 On June 28 
the Corporation voted " That the New College be kept securely shut 
up, and no Use made of it, either of Chambers or Cellars, for the 
next Comencm* to prevent the Damage that will otherwise neces- 
sariely be, while the house is new & Green;" 3 but on June 30, wrote 
President Leverett, "Upon the representation of the great dis- 
appointm* it was like to prove to Sundry of the Comencers not to 
emprove Some p tB of the New Building," the Corporation referred — 

the Opening or Shutting up that house either in p* or in Whole to the 
Presid 1 & Fellows with the advice of the s d Comittee. Accordingly It 
was advised and agreed that the West half of the House sh d be Open'd 
and Improved by Comencers as far as was requisite for their Accomoda- 
tion, the s d Comencers to Stand Obliged to render the Chambers & 
Studys impved by them to the Comittee in as good Order & Condition 
as they were at their Entry on them. And the South & North West 
Chambers are reserv'd and to be kept lock'd up. 4 

On July 18 the House appointed a committee "to go to Cambridge, 
& View the Additional Brick Building at Harxard-Colledge, Lately 
Errected there at the Province Charge, and Report how they find 
the same Effected." 5 On November 4 the committee reported that 
" they had attended that Service, and find it a well built and Finisht 



1 See Mr. Lane's exhaustive paper on "The Building of Massachusetts Hall, 
1717-1720," with plans, in our Publications, xxiv. 81-110. 

2 P. 450, below. 

3 P. 452, below. 

4 Leverett's Diary, p. 178. 

6 Massachusetts House Journal, p. 10. 



Cll INTRODUCTION 

House, and well adapted to the Reception of Students;" and that 
" they had Received the Keys of said Building, which with the Presi- 
dent, they named Massachusets-Hall, and Delivered said Keys to 
the President, as to the President and Fellows of Harvard Colledge." 1 
On July 29, 1720, Judge Sewall waited "on the President, and 
Chuse a Chamber in the New-Colledge for Cousin Quincey, and 
Sam. Hirst." 2 On April 4, 1721, the Corporation ordered that 
"the fence on the South side of Massachusets Hall be made on a 
Parallel Line with the House at 45 Foot distant from it, A Slope 
to be made at the Southerly End of it, to avoid the Deep ground 
and ditch as occasion may be." 3 On September 5, 1722, the Cor- 
poration voted that the Treasurer "be desired to enquire what may 
be y e Cost of a Bell and Clock proper for the College." 4 On June 2, 
1725, the Corporation voted that "a New well be dug and a pump 
put into it at the South East Corner of the yard to accomodate the 
Students in Stoughton & Massachusets Colleges." 5 And on the 
same day it was also voted — 

That the Steward be desired to see the Bell hung for the Clock to 
strike on and give an account of the Charges thereof And that the care 
of the Clock be committed to him for this year to keep it going and that 
he have four pounds for his service in keeping it in Order. 6 

Nowhere in these records is it stated where the bell and clock were 
placed, but in the Burgis Prospect of the Colledges of 1726 the clock 
is plainly shown on the western gable of Massachusetts Hall; and 
that it was actually there is further proved by what Dr. Alexander 
Hamilton, a Scotsman travelling up from Maryland, wrote when 
he visited Cambridge on August 15, 1744: 

The college is a square building or quadrangle about 150 feet every 
way. The building [the second Harvard College] upon the left hand as 
you enter the court is the largest and handsomest and most ancient, 
being about 100 years old; but the middle or front building [Stoughton 
College] is indifferent and of no taste. That upon the right hand [Massa- 
chusetts Hall] has a little clock upon it, which has a very good bell. In 



1 Massachusetts House Journal, p. 6. 

2 Diary, iii. 259. The youths were Edmund Quincy of the Class of 1722 and 
Samuel Hirst (a grandson of SewalTs) of the Class of 1723. 

8 P. 456, below. 4 P. 474, below. 

* P. 522, below. 6 P. 523, below. 



MASSACHUSETTS HALL (BUILT 1720) ctil 

the library are three or four thousand volumes with some curious edi- 
tions of the classics, presented to the college by Dean Barklay. There 
are some curiosities, the best of which is the cut of a tree about ten 
inches thick and eight long, entirely petrified and turned to stone. 1 

Massachusetts Hall was thus described in 1788: "It is one hundred 
feet long, and forty wide, 2 and contains thirty-two convenient 
chambers, each accommodated with two closets, for the use of the 
students." 3 Of the three buildings shown in Burgis's 1726 Prospect 
of the Colledges, Massachusetts Hall was the youngest and is the 
only one now standing: see the frontispiece to this volume. Massa- 
chusetts Hall is not only the oldest of the College buildings, but it is, 
with a single exception, the oldest college building in this country, 4 
and it was the first college building in this country to be called a 
Hall. 5 



1 Itinerarium (1907), pp. 173-174. The clock is also seen in the "View of 
Harvard College about 1764," by Du Simitiere, facing p. 66 of our Publications, 
xiv. 

2 In a plan made about 1765, President Holyoke gave the width as 42 feet 
(see Plan H, facing p. 260, below); and in another place he wrote: "The length 
of Massachusetts Hall 109 feet" (p. 335, below). 

3 Columbian Magazine, ii. 673. 

4 The College of William and Mary was founded in 1693, and the original 
building, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, was intended to be in the form of a 
square; but, owing to lack of funds, only two sides of the quadrangle were built, 
and in 1705 these were destroyed by fire. Rebuilt on a somewhat different 
plan, the edifice was injured by fire in 1859 and again in the Civil War; but 
President Lyon G. Tyler informed the present Editor in 1900 that the walls are 
those of 1705 : hence it is the oldest college building now existing in this country. 

The first college building to be erected at New Haven was a wooden structure, 
the frame of which was raised October 8, 1717, and at Commencement (Sep- 
tember 12) in 1718 it was "most solemnly named our College by the name of 
Yale College, to perpetuate the memory of the Hon ble Gov r . Elihu Yale, Esq; 
of London, who had granted so liberal and bountiful a donation for the per- 
fecting and adorning of it" (in F. B. Dexter, Yale Biographies and Annals, 
i. 177). "It was," wrote President Clap in 1766, "170 Feet long, 22 Feet wide, 
and 3 Story high; made a handsome Appearance, and contained near 50 Studies 
in convenient Chambers, besides the Hall, Library, and Kitchen" (Annals or 
History of Yale-College, p. 24). On August 17, 1782, President Stiles wrote: 
"As we are about to build a new dining Hall & Kitchen, this day began to pull 
down the Remnant of old College. The old Coll. Edifice was built 1717 three 
stories high & 170 feet long. Two Thirds of it was pulled down 6 or 7 years 
ago — leaving the Hall, Buttery & Kitchen standing;" and later added: "[Fin- 
ished its Demolition Oct. 1782.]" (Literary Diary, iii. 35). 

6 See pp. cxxix-cxxx, below. 



CIV INTRODUCTION 

President's Houses 
First: Peyntree House (1637-1641) 

Of the six buildings thus far described, all but Goffe's College 
were erected for the accommodation of the students; and Goffe's 
College, originally a private house, was for a few years used for the 
same purpose. In addition to these buildings, one house was ac- 
quired and three houses were built, previous to 1750, for the accom- 
modation of the President, and in one or all of those houses students 
were or may have been at times lodged. In or about November, 
1637, Nathaniel Eaton was betrusted "for the erecting of such 
Edifices as were meet and necessary for a College, & for his own 
Lodgings." 1 If by "his own Lodgings" was meant a new house, 
certainly none was built; but probably the words referred only to 
necessary repairs in the house that on September 5, 1635, was owned 
by William Peyntree, 2 and in which Eaton doubtless lived until 
his dismissal on September 9, 1639. This was the house the founda- 
tion walls of which were uncovered on January 18, 1910. 3 Its site 
is marked on the plan facing page lxviii, above. 

No doubt President Dunster occupied the same house from his 
coming to the College on August 27, 1640, until his marriage to 
Elizabeth Glover 4 on June 22, 1641, when he removed to the Glover 
mansion, where he resided until the death of his wife on August 23, 
1643. 

Second: Dunster's House (1645-1680) 

In 1644 Dunster married again, 5 and, apparently, asked to have 
a house provided for him. At all events, on November 13, 1644, the 
General Court ordered — 






1 P. 172, below. 

2 Cambridge Proprietors' Records (1896), p. 16. 

3 P. lxix note, above. Exactly what became of the Peyntree house is not known. 
Perhaps it was "the old house" which is twice mentioned in an account of the 
rents drawn up by President Chauncy, undated, but apparently written in or 
about 1656 or 1658 (p. 19, below). 

4 Elizabeth (Harris) Glover was the second wife and the widow of the Rev. Jose 
Glover, who had died on his passage to New England with a printing press in the 
summer or autumn of 1638. In calling Mrs. Glover "the second wife of President 
Henry Dunster" (Harvard Graduates, ii. 247), Sibley fell into one of his few errors. 

5 The christian name of Dunster's second wife was Elizabeth, but her sur- 
name is not known. 






SECOND PRESIDENTS HOUSE: DUNSTER S HOUSE, 1645-1680 CV 

That M r Dunster, psident of the col[ledge] at Cambridge, shall have 
150* assigned unto him, to be gathered by y e Treasurer for y e colledge 
out of y e mony due for y e children sent out of England, to be expended 
for a house to be built for y e said psident, in pt of y e 400* pmised unto 
him for his use, to belong to y e colledge. 1 

There is no evidence that this money was ever received by Dunster, 
but he appealed to his friends, obtained funds, and the house was 
built. In a petition to the General Court dated November 4, 1654, 
Dunster said: 

And whereas your humble petitioner with singular industry thorow 
great difficultyes erected the house wherein for the present he dwelleth, 
it is his humble desire that he may peacably enjoy the same, untill all 
accounts due to him from ye Corporation be orderly and valuably to 
him your humble petitioner satisfyed and pay'd. 2 

And in some "Considerons ag Bt p r sent Removals p r sented to y e 
hon rd generall court," dated November 10, 1654, he further said: 

3. The Place from w ch [I go] 

1. There all pvitions are layd in for man & beast for y is winter. . . . 

3. Thence to remove som things now is to destroy y m utterly, to 
leave y m so will undertake for y m . 

4. And to remove others is to hazzard y m very greatly as books 
& househould goods. . . . 

6. Its y e place w ch upon very damagef ul condons to myself, out of loue 
to y e Coll : I haue builded viz by taking con try pay in lieu of bils payd in 
England or y e sayd house had not been built yea a very considerable part of 
it was given me at my request out of respect to myself albeit for y e Coll: s 

At an Overseers' meeting on November 27, 1654, "m r Henry 
Punster consented to remove out of the Presidents house by the 
|last of March next." 4 In the inventory of December 10, 1654, the 
third item reads: "The Presidents dwelling house, barne with 2 
leantoes & other appurtenances." 5 No doubt the house was occu- 
pied by President Chauncy from the spring of 1655 6 to his death 

1 Massachusetts Colony Records, ii. 84. 

2 In Peirce, History, Appendix, p. 152. 

3 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 30. 

4 P. 207, below. e P. 208, below. 

6 Where Chauncy lived from November 27, 1654, until the President's House 
was vacated by Dunster in the spring of 1655, does not appear. On November 1, 



CV1 INTRODUCTION 

on February 19, 1C72, and by President Hoar from December 10, 
1G72, to his resignation on March 15, 1G75. 

The exact location of Dunster's house is not known. Mr. Little- 
field thought, probably correctly, that it stood on the Betts lot a 
little north of where Massachusetts Hall now is; but his reasons for 
supposing that the house was at one time "moved a short distance 
to the east" of its original site are inconclusive, and he was certainly 
in error in stating that the President's House demolished in 1719 
was the house built by Dunster, 1 for the Dunster house was either 
taken down or abandoned as a President's House in 1680. 

Third (1680-1719) 

It is known with certainty that when Massachusetts Hall was 
built in 1717-1720, the President's House was taken down, 2 and it 
has hitherto always been stated that the President's House then 
demolished was the house built by Dunster. It can now be shown 
that a new President's House was built in 1680. 

From the resignation of Dr. Hoar on March 15, 1675, to February 
9, 1680, the College was without an actual President, and Urian 
Oakes, though Acting President, resided from April 7, 1675, to 
the summer or autumn of 1680 in the First Church parsonage, 



1654, the General Court, "having considered of the mocon that hath binn made 
in behalf of M r Chancy, for the providing of a howse & other accomodacons for 
his setleinent at Cambridge, doe judg meete to referr what yett remajnes to 
be donne to the honored & reuerend ouerseers, to whom it most propperly be- 
longs" (Massachusetts Colony Records, vol. ii. pt. i. p. 216). On January 8, 
1666, the town "Granted liberty to fell timber on the comon To the Coll. for 
mending y r fences ab* y c p r sid ts garden" (Cambridge Town Records, p. 160). 
On September 27, 1670, the Treasurer was ordered by the Corporation "to re- 
build the Presidents fences against the high way with a stone wall & pay for it 
out of the Colledge Treary" (p. 225, below; cf. p. 52, below). This shows that 
the second President's House (Dunster's house) faced what is now Massachu- 
setts Avenue on the west. 

1 Early Press of Massachusetts (Club of Odd Volumes, 1907), i. 80, 149. 
On May 10, 1652, "Liberty is granted by the Townsmen to Mr. Dunster for to 
fell some timber on the common, about 2 tun, for the repare of his house and 
fences, but not for the use of the Colledge to take any of the common" (Cam- 
bridge Town Records, 1901, p. 95). Quoting this passage, Mr. Littlefield re- 
marked: "Evidently Mr. Dunster was making repairs considerably larger than 
would be necessary in a house that had been built only a few years." This is 
slight evidence on which to base the conclusion of a removal of the house. 

8 See p. cxiii, below. 



THIRD PRESIDENT S HOUSE, 1680-1719 cvii 

which, built in 1670, 1 stood within the present College Yard con- 
siderably east of where Wadsworth House now is. On becoming 
actual President in 1680, Oakes informed the Overseers "that pro- 
uision was necessary to be made for his Lodging nearer the Colledge 
y n wher he now hues in order to his more constant & conuenient 
Attendace of his place." But though a new house was built, yet 
the facts in regard to it are obscure. 

The three following documents have not before been printed. 

I 

Wheras this Court hath Incouradged: the Corporation of Haruard 
Colledge & the Hono r ed & Reuerend overseers therof in chooseing & 
establishing the reuerend m r Vrian Oakes as prsesedent of the Colledge 
of which place he hath Accepted; But p r sented his request to the over- 
seers that prouision was necessary to be made for his Lodgings nearer 
the Colledge y n wher he now Hues in order to his more constant & con- 
uenient Attendace of his place: To this end William Stoughton Esq 
Humphery Dauy Esq: & Capt. John Richards Esq are herby appointed 
A comitte to joyne w th som of o r Brethen y e deputies to Inspict y* 
matter & forthwith take effectall course y* necessary & Conuenient Lodg- 
ings Bee fitted for y e p r sedent, as neare the Colledge as may bee: & to 
appoint & impower Instrumts to doe all act or acts & things necessary 
thervnto: for the effectuall doeing thereof according to y r best discrea- 
tion; with all conuenient dispach: 

The Magistrates have Passed this desyring their bretheren y e Deputys 
to Consent theretoe 

John Pynchon p Order 

May. 28. 1680. 

The Deputys Consent hereto & haue appoynted Cap* Wayte Leiv* 
W m Johnson & m r Joseph Lynd to Joyne with the Gentlemen aboue 
mentioned who are hereby empowred to make vse of such or part of the 
Colledge State or Stocke as may attayne the ends proposed, provided, 
they meddle not with any thing y* is giuen to pticular Vses & in case 
that shall not fully attayne the ends, the Treasur r is hereby ordered to 



1 Paige, History of Cambridge, pp. 270-271; A. McKenzie, Lectures on the 
History of the First Church in Cambridge (1873), pp. 120, 263; Harvard Book 
(1875), ii. 26-28; Historic Guide to Cambridge (1907), pp. 18-20. The par- 
sonage lot, together with the meeting-house lot, came into the possession of 
the College in 1833, and the house was taken down in 1843. 



CV111 INTRODUCTION 

make payment of so much as shalbe wantinge for the finishing of y e 
worke in good country pay so as the whole charge exceed not 200 u & 
further the sd Comittee are desired & empowred diligently to enquire 
into the Colledg Stocke & how much may be had there, towards the 
carying an end of that worke that they may be the better enabled, to 
know what bills to draw vpon the Country Treasurer for further supply 
if need be the deputys haue past this o r hono ed magists hereto consent- 
inge, 

William Torrey Cleric. 

10: 4: 1680 

[Endorsed] 
A house for the President of harvard Colledge may 1680 l 

II 
June the 9th 1680 

Wheras the reuerend m r Oakes is chosen p r sedent of the colledge, 
But cannot conueniently attend constantly in that office, vntill Lodg- 
ings for the p r sident bee prouided neare 2 the Colledge: & wheras a 
comitte of this Court have lately survaid the old house called the p r se- 
dents Lodging & doe judge the same to bee so defectiue that it is not 
worth repayring. It is therfore ordered by this court & the Authority 
therof that there be new Lodgings Built & finished w th all conue- 
nient speed; in some conuenient place as neare as may be to the New 
Colledge: and A B C D E F are appointed a comittee to agree with worke- 
men To build & finish the same: to effect & they are impoured to chardg 
bills vpon the contry Treasurer, to pay the somes contracted for by 
them not exceeding one hundred pounds in mony: and that all mate- 
rialls of y e old building that may be fitt bee vsed in the new building 
The rest to be paid out of the Colledge stocke 

The magists haue past this [desiring] their brethren the deputyes [to 
consent] 3 hereto 



The deputs Consent not hereto 

[Endorsed] 

mr Oakes 1680 4 



Edw d Rawson Secret 
William Torrey Cleric. 



1 Massachusetts Archives, Iviii. 103. 
- Altered from "nearer." 

1 The words within square brackets appear to have been inadvertently 
omitted. 

* Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 103a. 



THIRD PRESIDENT S HOUSE, 1680-1719 cix 

III 

By the Gov r & Council in Boston 
28: 2: 1681 
It is Ordered that such out-houses and ffenceing as is necessary yet 
to bee done about the Presidents Lodgeing bee forthwith erected, and 
m r Manning and Deacon Cooper the Trustees for the Colledgenew 
buildings are desired and hnpow r ed to take care for the doing thereof, 
So as may bee most accomodable & durable; & they are to gather in 
what remain's behinde of the Contribution for the Colledge buildings 
and improve the same for that end, and in case that fall short the Treas- 
uro r of the Country shall pay the same as they shall order, and they are 
to take the advice of the Corporation for the placeing of both houses and 
ffences. 

past by the Council die pdict. 

and ordered to the Secretary to enter 
Is A Addington Cl re 

p order * 

These documents are puzzling and their meaning is by no means 
clear. Fortunately, however, there is another source of information, 
from which it is learned with certainty that the house was built. For 
in Treasurer Richards's Book are charges for £20 paid July 1, 1680, 
"vnto Thomas Willus Carpenter in pt toward building Presidents 
house p note to Cap* John Hull," for £49 paid July 5, for £24 paid 
July 20, for £25.2.8 paid August 13, and for £141.17.4 paid Septem- 
ber 23 — a total of £260, "w ch 260* is in full for the house for the 
p r sident fencing &c." Then on November 27, 1680, Richards paid 
" Deacon Jn° Cooper money 5* for digging & making y e well" — 
presumably the well for the new President's House. Finally, on 
March 24, 1681, Richards paid "Will m Bordman Cooke money 
3 1 7 s for dinner for raising p r sidents house p order." 2 

That this house was occupied by Presidents Oakes and Rogers, 
there can be no reasonable doubt. After the death of Rogers on 
July 2, 1684, a curious situation arose. Increase Mather became 



1 Massachusetts Archives, Iviii. 106. 

2 These extracts are copied from the original, so far as that is decipherable: 
see p. xxviii note 1, above. That the three documents from the Massachusetts 
Archives should have thus far escaped notice is not so strange, but it is singular 
that the significance of the items in Richards's Book should have hitherto caught 
no one's eye, for those items were printed as long ago as 1862: see p. xxviii note 1, 
above. 



CX INTRODUCTION 

Acting President on June 11, 1685, but refused to take up his resi- 
dence in Cambridge, though on several occasions he stayed there for 
brief periods. Then, too, from April, 1688, to May, 1692, he was in 
England, and so for many years the President's House was without 
the occupant for whom it had been built. Hence it was used for 
students, for on September 5, 1692, the Corporation voted that 
"y e Rents due on the Account of Studies & Chambers in the Presi- 
dents house be disposed of to y e Use of y e President, or as he shall 
See Cause." 1 

Towards the end of the century, the controversy between the 
General Court and Mather as to his residence in Cambridge became 
acute. On July 13, 1700, the General Court appointed a committee 
"to take Care that a suitable Place at Cambridge be Provided for 
the Reception and Entertainm* of the Presid* of Harvard Colledge, 
And to see and Consider what is meet to be done with respect to the 
House already built for a President's House." 2 In his letter to 
Stoughton of October 17, 1700, Mather said: "I must needs say, 
that I thinke a great hardship has been putt upon me, in urgeing me 
to remove to Cambridge, before there was any house to receive me, 
or settlem* of y e Collidge on a charter foundation, or maintenance 
of my family." 3 On March 7, 1701, the committee that had been 
appointed by the General Court in the previous July reported that — 

We . . . did Accordingly repair to Cambridge & pcured Sutable En- 
tertainment At m r Aron Boardmans for the reception of the p r sident, 
w ch was then Acceptable to him, We likewise, viewed y e hous y* was 
built for Entertainment of the p r sident, and found y e Scittuation As 
conuenient as any place thereaboutes, but y e hous was much out of re- 
pair but Judge it may be made Accomadable for y e End it was designed 
for. 4 

On March 15 it was — 

Ordered That the dwelling-house in Cambridge built for a Presidents 
house be forthwith repaired, and fitted up for that use, and that . . . 
be ... a Committee to take Effectual Order that the said House be 
repaired accordingly, and to Lay the acc u of the Charge there of before 



1 P. 340, below. 

1 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 209a. 

8 Harvard College Papers, i. 65. 

1 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 219. 



THIRD PRESIDENT S HOUSE, 1680-1719 CXI 

the Governour, and Council for Allowance, and payment to be Ordered 
Accordingly. 1 

In his letter to Stoughton of June 30, 1701, Mather said: 

I promised the last General Court, to take care of the Colledge until 
the Commencem 1 Accordingly I have bin residing in Cambridge, these 
three months. I am determined (if the Lord will) to return to Boston 
the next week, and no more return to reside in Cambridge; for it is not 
reasonable to desire me to be (as out of Respect to the Publick Interest, 
I have bin Six months within this twelve month) any longer absent from 
my ffamily. And it is much more unreasonable to desire one, so circum- 
stanced as I am to remove my ffamily to Cambridge, when the Colledge 
is in such an Unsettled state. 2 

If Mather occupied the house in 1701 it could only have been for 
a short time, since he evidently returned to Boston early in July and 
he resigned the presidency on September 6th. It was presumably used 
by Vice President Willard in 1701-1707, whenever he had occasion 
to stay in Cambridge on his visits to the College. When Leverett 
became President on January 14, 1708, he was living in his own 
mansion house, 3 which stood a little east of where Wadsworth House 



1 Court Records, vii. 175. John Leverett was one of this committee. 

2 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 226. Mather is the only President who has 
not lived in Cambridge. On September 5, 1692, the Corporation voted that 
"y e Treasurer of the Colledge take care y* y e Presidents Horse be well kept at y e 
Charge of the Colledge" (p. 340, below). On June 8, 1696, the Corporation voted 
that "y e Colledge Treasurer should pay to y e Rev d Presid* such mony as he 
should need to purchase a horse with, for y e better Capacitating him to make 
his Visits &c at y e Colledge" (p. 353, below). From July 4, 1693, to July 11, 
1696, the sum of £482.2.0 was paid out in "Salaries &c & for keeping y e Presid ts 
Horse" (p. 414, below). The following item, dated April 11, 1701, is found in 
Treasurer Brattle's Book: "Cash Sent m r Presid* on his note 4 ib 13 s to pay 
Peggy keeping his horse 13 lb at 6/ p week, & for keeping him 3 weeks at Cam- 
bridg at 5/ p week" (p. 66). 

3 Leverett's mansion house stood on the Wigglesworth lot: see the plan 
facing p. lxviii, above. The lot in 1635 was owned by the Rev. Thomas Hooker, 
and after his departure in 1636 became the property of the Rev. Thomas Shep- 
ard, whose second wife was Mr. Hooker's daughter Joanna. On August 21, 1650, 
the Rev. Jonathan Mitchell (1647) succeeded Mr. Shepard (who had died August 
25, 1649) as pastor of the First Church; on November 19th following Mr. Mitchell 
married Mr. Shepard's third wife and widow Margaret; and on February 28, 
1651, Mr. Mitchell bought the Shepard homestead. Mr. Mitchell died July 9, 
1668, and on the death of his wife Margaret in 1691 the homestead was inherited 
by her son Jonathan Mitchell (1687) and her daughter Margaret Mitchell, the 



CX11 INTRODUCTION 

now is, and he appears to have resided there throughout his presi- 
dency. On November 2, 1708, he addressed the following letter to 
Speaker Oliver: 

You may remember that some years Since the Gen 1 Assembly re- 
paired the Presidents house at Cambr. near the Colledge for the Use and 
benefit of the Presid* then Chosen, and for his Incouragm* Since those 
raparacons were made It having bin but Little Inhabited, the house is 
gon ag n much to decay, and unless repaired is in Danger of being soon 
in dispair; I presume y e Design of the Governm 1 is that the benefit of y* 
house sh d be to the presid* that now is, and that there sh d A benefit 
arise to him from it, tho he doth not Actualy inhabit it. 

If a Presid* were to dwell in the House it w d require a thoro repair, 
but to prevent it's total mine the Charge wil not be so much, yet some- 
thing must be don. 

I have presumed to do something before the Assembly met, because 
otherwise the Season would have bin Lapsed and the place desolate & 
scandalous. Something more is needfull Still, I have desired M r Willis a 
Worthy Member of your hon ble House to View the House, what has bin 
don to make it usefull, and what Still is necessary to be don, who will, if 
you please open the matter to you & the Hon ble House. I pray your 
favour in this affaire, that it may be moved to the House, and that 
Suitable provision may be made, and direction given that may Save 
such Charge as I have bin at, the House preserved & that smal benefit 
that it may afford may Accrue to S r Yo r humble Serv* l 

This letter was read in the House on the same day and again on 
the 5th, when it was — 

Ordered That m r Speaker, & m r Stephen Willis, be a Comittee, to 
Take Care for the Repair, of the House built, for the use of the Presi- 



latter of whom had married Stephen Sewall of Salem on June 13, 1682. Jona- 
than Mitchell died March 14, 1695, and devised his share to his sister, Mrs. 
Sewall. John Leverett bought the estate of Stephen and Margaret (Mitchell) 
Sewall on February 4, 1696, and on his death in 1724 it went to his daugh- 
ters Sarah Leverett and Mary (Leverett) Denison. On May 4, 1726, Mrs. 
Denison conveyed her half to her sister Sarah, who on June 11, 1726, sold the 
house and part of the estate to Professor Edward Wigglesworth, to whom she 
was married four days later (June 15). From Professor Edward Wigglesworth 
the estate went to his son, the second Professor Edward Wigglesworth, who 
died June 17, 1794, and on October 17th it was bought by the College. The 
house was removed in 1844. (Middlesex Deeds, x. 488, xxv. 191, 410, 689, 
cxvi. 295, 296; Middlesex Probate Files, no. 14045; Harvard Book, ii. 22-25.) 
1 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 265. 



THIRD PRESIDENT S HOUSE, 1680-1719 Cxiil 

dent, of Harvard Colledge at Cambridge, & Bring in the acc° of the 
Charge, to this Court. 

This was sent up to the Council, where it was concurred on the 
6th. 1 On June 17, 1709, Andrew Bordman was added to the com- 
mittee "to Take care for the Repair of the House built at Cambridge, 
for the use of the President, of Harvard Colledge;" 2 on August 26 
the House voted that £12 "be allowed, & Paid, . . . to . . . one 
of the Committee, appointed to Repair the President's House, at 
Cambridge, to Purchase, materials necessary for that end," and the 
next day the Council concurred; 3 and in February, 1710, various 
charges were paid by the General Court. 4 

The exact location of the third President's House is not known, 
but it stood on the Betts lot, near or on the site of Massachusetts 
Hall. It was taken down about June, 1719, 5 as appears from a letter 
written December 6, 1720, by Leverett to Speaker Lindall, praying 
that official "to intimate to the Honorable House," — 

1. That the Demolition in part, and the removal of the remains of 
the Presid ts House have deprived me of that part of Subsist , which has 
bin always pvided by y e Countrey for all the Presid* 3 of the College, 
which even Non-resid 4 Presid ts for ever have had the benefit of. 6 



1 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 265. 

2 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 270. 

3 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 273. 

4 Massachusetts Archives, lviii. 274. One charge was as follows: "1703. 
Payd Nath 1 Adams for a New Pump £3.0.0." To this Leverett has appended 
the note: "The pump was Sett & made new for M r Willard; I disburs'd y e money 
& was never reimburs'd" (Massachusetts Province Laws, ix. 105). 

5 The date usually given is 1720, but Leverett's letter of December 6, 1720, 
quoted in the text, states that "the yearly revenue . . . has now ceased for a 
year and a half," which would indicate June in 1719 as the approximate date 
of the demolition of the house. 

6 Mather was the only non-resident President, but he was allowed the revenue 
derived from the President's House: see p. ex, above. It was not uncommon 
for a President to eke out his meagre salary by taking boarders or lodgers. Thus, 
Samuel Haugh was placed by his father "a scholler to be taught by his late 
master M r Nathaniell Eaton at Cambridge in New England and to be boarded 
in house w th him" and he "abode as a scholler & boarder w th his said master 
Nathaniell Eaton about foure weekes" (in T. Lechford, Note-Book, 1885, p. 361). 
Nathaniel Rowe was sent "vnto M r Eaton, y* marchants brother, to be in- 
structed in the rudiments of the Lattine tongue" and "liued w th him about a 
moneth" (Winthrop Papers, iii. 320). Richard Lyon, the tutor of William 
Mildmay, lived with President Dunster (Sibley, Harvard Graduates, i. 165 



CX1V INTRODUCTION 

2. That what accrued from the Disposal of that House was improved 
in yon Noble Additional Building. 1 

3. That above Twenty pounds of my own money disbursed to make 
the presid tB House of any Significant Advantage to me, when I c d not 
dwell in it myself is Sunk and carry'd off in and with it, to So much 
Sensible Loss to me, besides that of the yearly revenue, Which has now 
ceased for a Year & half. 2 

Whether the allusion in the last paragraph is to the expense in- 
curred by Leverett soon after becoming President, 3 or to some 
repairs undertaken at a later time, is uncertain; but on April 1, 1723, 
the Corporation voted "That £19-2-10 be paid to the Presid*, he 
having disbursed so much upon the Presid* 8 House to Accomodate 
it for the Stud* 8 to dwell in." 4 



note). There is mention of "the study which was Sir Pelham's, in the chamber 
above the printing room" (Proceedings American Antiquarian Society, vi. 345), 
the latter being in President Dunster's house. President Holyoke often mentions 
boarders and lodgers and while he occupied Wadsworth House one of the rooms 
was known as the "Boarders Chamber" (Holyoke Diaries, 1911, pp. 11, 13, 17, 
20, 25, 28). 

1 Massachusetts Hall. 

* Harvard College Papers, i. 128. 

8 See p. cxii, above. 

4 P. 485, below. For the third President's House, see also Massachusetts 
Province Laws, vii. 262, 653, 671-672, ix. 37, 69, 79, 105. 

It is presumed that the allusion in the text (under date of April 1, 1723) is to 
the third President's House. But it should be pointed out that during the presi- 
dency of Leverett, owing to the fact that he lived not in the third President's 
House but in his own mansion house, there is ambiguity about the term "Presi- 
dent's House." Thus, the meetings of the Corporation "at the President's 
House" in 1720 and 1721 (pp. 448, 459, 460, 462, below) must have been held in 
Leverett's mansion house, since the third President's House had been demolished 
in or about June, 1719. Again, meetings of the Corporation "at the President's 
House" in 1711 and 1712 (pp. 395, 398, 402, below) were also presumably held 
in Leverett's mansion house. Once more, when Sewall "went to the President's 
house" on July 2, 1712 (Diary, ii. 355), and when he stated on July 6, 1719, that 
certain students were "examined by the President, Mr. Flynt and Sever at the 
President's house" (iii. 222), he was presumably referring to Leverett's mansion 
house. On the other hand, when the Judge on April 8, 1707, carried his son 
Joseph "a small piece of Plate to present his Tutor [Jonathan Remington] with," 
and "View'd his [Joseph's] Chamber in the President's House, which I like" 
(ii. 183), presumably Joseph's chamber was in the third President's House. In 
1892 a writer wrongly stated that "The room which Joseph Sewall was now to 
occupy was in the house built by President Dunster" (New England Genealogical 
and Historical Register, xlvi. 7). 






FOURTH PRESIDENT'S HOUSE: WADSWORTH HOUSE CXV 

Fourth: Wadsworth House 

President Leverett died on May 3, 1724. On June 11 the Cor- 
poration drew up an address to the General Court in which it pointed 
out that Leverett's "Mansion House in Cambrige . . . wil be . . . 
Speedily offered to Sale," that "the College is now without any 
Presidents House it being removed & disposed of wn the Massa- 
chusets College was built," that "it has pleased the Government 
of this Province ... in times past ... to provide a House for 
the President to reside in," that the purchase of the Leverett home- 
stead "wil not be much more Expence to the Country than the 
building a New House for the President wil amount to," and there- 
fore praying for the appointment of a committee "to inspect the 
said House and Lands . . . and to purchase the same to be the 
seat and Habitation of the Presidents of Harv d College in Times to 
come." 1 This address was read in Council and "sent down recom- 
mended" on the 12th, and was read in the House on the 13th, but 
no further action was taken. 2 On August 11 Joseph Sewall was 
elected President, but declined, 3 as did also Benjamin Colman, who 
was elected on November 18, 1724. 4 Finally, on June 8, 1725, the 
choice fell on Benjamin Wadsworth, 5 who accepted and was in- 
augurated on Commencement Day, July 7. In his letter of accept- 
ance, dated June 17, he said: 

I propose (by y e will of God) to remove to Cambridge to Ingage in the 
service I'm calPd to, as soon as conveniently may be; when proper care 
shall be taken by those whom it concerns, to provide an House for y e 
President to dwell in, and a suitable support or maintaince for him. 6 

On the same day a committee of the Overseers informed the House 
that Mr. Wadsworth had been elected by the Corporation, appro- 
bated by the Overseers, released by the First Church in Boston, and 
had accepted, and "Recommended it to the serious Consideration 
of the House to Establish such a Sallary and Allowance for the 
Support and Maintenance of" Mr. Wadsworth, "which might be 



1 Pp. 508-509, below. 

2 Massachusetts House Journal, p. 39. 
J P. 511, below. 

4 P. 517, below. 
6 P. 523, below. 
6 Wadsworth's Diary, p. 5. This passage is crossed out in the original. 



CXvi INTRODUCTION 

Equal to the High and Important Office of Presidency of Harvard 
Colledge" l On the next day (June 18) the House appointed a com- 
mittee "in the Recess of this Court to Inquire into and Examine" 
various matters relating to the College, granted Mr. Wadsworth 
£150 "to Enable him to Enter upon and Manage the great Affair of 
President of Hanard-Colledgc" — 

And the said Committee are hereby impowred to look out a suitable 
House for the Reception of the President, and know what the same may 
be had for, and make Report of the whole to this Court at their next 
Session." 2 

On June 22 the House was informed by the Council that " the Board 
have concurred the Vote for a Committee to look out for a con- 
venient House," but were of opinion that the committee might be 
"impowred to take speedy Care to hire a House for the Reception 
of the Reverend President, he having expressed his Inclination to 
remove to Cambridge with his Family as soon as it may be done with 
Conveniency." Thereupon the House passed a vote, which was 
concurred by the Council on the 23rd, impowering the committee 
"to hire such a House for the Space of Six Month next coming, or 
until they make Report to this Court in their Fall Session." 3 On 
June 28 the mansion house of the late President Leverett was hired, 
and presumably Mr. Wadsworth moved into it at once. 4 



1 Massachusetts House Journal, pp. 50-51. 

2 Pp. 52-53. 
1 P. 64. 

4 In its memorial of August 21, 1726, the Corporation said that the house 
"could not be had for more than nine months, begining Jun. 28. 1725. When yt 
time expired, he [President Wadsworth] could no where hire a convenient House 
for himself, his Family is divided, some dwelling in one House & some in another, 
his Household Goods are dispos'd of in several Houses & Barns" (p. 542, below). 
The nine months expired on March 28, 1726, yet Wadsworth himself stayed 
in the Leverett house until May 9 and it was not until May 20 that all his family 
"left m r Levcrett's House" (p. cxviii, below). On January 5, 1726, the General 
Court appropriated £30 "for the Children and Heirs of the late President Leverett, 
and is for Nine Months Rent of the said Mr. President Leverctts Mansion House 
and homestead, <fcc. at Cambridge, hired by a Committee of this Court in their 
last Session" (Massachusetts House Journal, p. 105; cf. Massachusetts Province 
Laws, x. 736). On November 26, 1726, there was read in the House a petition 
from Sarah Leverett and Mary Denison showing that "for four years before 
the Death" of their father "he had no House allowed him as all other Presidents 
had the President's House being pulled down to make Room for the New Col- 



FOURTH PRESIDENT'S HOUSE: WADSWORTH HOUSE CXvii 

In a message to the General Court on November 3, Lieutenant- 
Governor Dummer recommended "an honourable Provision for the 
Support of the Worthy President of the College, the great Importance 
of which Trust You are all very sensible of, as well as the Great 
Expences which Unavoidably Attend it." 1 On December 16 the 
report of the committee appointed June 18 was read, and the House 
passed and sent up for concurrence a resolve appropriating certain 
sums for the President's support and for a new house. 2 On the 20th 
the Council concurred with certain amendments, which on the 21st 
were "Read and Non-Coneurr'd, and the House adhere to their 
own Vote;" 3 and on the same day (the 21st) the Council appointed 
a committee to confer with a committee of the House " on the Sub- 
ject Matter of that Article in the Vote Respecting" the President's 
"Maintenance this Present Year," but the House non-concurred. 4 
On the 24th the Council sent a message to the House inquiring as to 
exactly " what or how much the House intended by a sufficient and 
honourable Support and Maintenance for the said President," and 
asking for further particulars. 5 Finally, on December 31, 1725, a 
resolve passed both Houses appropriating certain sums in money to 
the President and " the future Annual Rents, and Incomes of Massa- 
chusets Hall." The resolve continued: 

And Whereas there is not at present any Convenient House provided 
for the Reception and Entertainment of the President of the said Col- 
lege for the future, ... It is also Resolved, That the Sum of One Thou- 
sand Pounds be allowed and paid out of the Publick Treasury to the 
Corporation of Harvard College, and by them to be forthwith used and 
disposed of, for the Building and Finishing a handsome Wooden Dwell- 
ing House, Barn, Out-Housen, Sec. on some part of the Lands Adjacent 
and belonging to the said College, which is for the Reception and Ac- 



lege by which he lost Twenty Pounds a Year, And that there is now due to the 
Petitioners two Months Rent of their House in which Mr. President Wadsworth 
dwelt;" and the House voted £30 "in full Satisfaction of and in Answer to the 
Petition Viz Twenty Pounds in Consideration of the late President Leverett's 
Salary from April 14 to May 3 1724, And Ten Pounds in Consideration of the 
two Months House Rent mentioned in the Petition," and on December 13th 
the Council concurred (Massachusetts Province Laws, xi. 86; cf. Massachusetts 
House Journal, p. 6; Massachusetts Province Laws, x. 619-620, 736). 

1 Massachusetts House Journal, p. 2. 

2 Pp. 77-78. 3 P. 86. 
* P. 87. » P. 94. 



CXV111 INTRODUCTION 

commodation of the Reverend the President of Harvard College, for the 
time being. 1 

On January 1, 172G, the Council expressed the opinion, "it would 
be best for the Corporation to be at Liberty for the Disposal of the 
Z.1000 either to Build or Buy a House for the President, as their 
Prudence shall direct and guide them;" but, the question being 
put in the House, "It pass'd in the Negative." 2 On January 12 
the Corporation voted an address of thanks to the Assembly, which 
was read in Council on the 14th and in the House on the 15th; 3 and 
on the 18th appointed a committee "for y e building y e said Presi- 
dent's House." 4 On May 9, wrote President Wadsworth, who until 
then had occupied the Leverett mansion, "We remov'd to Deacon 
Cooledge's, I & my wife lodg'd there y e following night, tho y e rest 
of y e Family yt night in y e House we came from;" and on May 20th 
"All our Family left m r Leverett's House, and went to lodge at 
Brother Bordman's." 5 Then follows the entry: 

The President's House to dwell in, was raised May 24. 1726. No life 
was lost, nor person hurt in raising it, thanks be to God for his preserving 
goodness. In y e Evening, those who raised y e House, had a Supper in y 9 
Hall; after wch we sang y e first stave or staff in y e 127. psalm. 6 

On August 21 the Corporation drew up a memorial to the General 
Court, in which it stated: 

We did speedily and diligently set about y e work we were thus directed 
to. A Dwelling House, Barn &c are erected on the College Lands afore- 
said, y e House is allmost Jntirely finished as to outside work, the Walls 
of y e whole House are fill'd; y e westerly End and part of y e Entry is 
floor'd, lath'd, and partly plaistered; Some part of y e House is glaz'd, 
and y e remaining Windows, we hope, will soon be finished: nothing is 
done as to y e Fencing Yard, Garden &c. 

But Materials and Labour for Building being very dear (tho utmost 
care and Frugality have been used) we find y e Thousand Pounds will 



1 Massachusetts House Journal, pp. 99-100. Cf . Massachusetts Province Laws, 
x. 731-732. 

2 Massachusetts House Journal, p. 101. 3 P. 111. 
* Pp. 534-535, below. 

6 Wadsworth's Diary, p. 31. Wadsworth married Ruth Bordman, the sister 
of Andrew Bordman (the College Steward from 1703 to 1747). 
6 Wadsworth's Diary, p. 32. 



FOURTH PRESIDENTS HOUSE: WADSWORTH HOUSE CX1X 

not finish y e Work prescribed. ... we therefore Jntreat this Hon ble 
Court, yt we may be further directed and enabled to obey your former 
order, viz. to Build and Finish an Handsome House &C. 1 

The House "having not seen cause to answer y e prayer" made 
above, 2 the Corporation on September 6 asked the Lieutenant 
Governor to call a meeting of the Overseers "for their Advice & 
Counsel what further steps be proper to be taken;" 3 on the 29th 
the Overseers "recommended to y e Corporation ... to get y e 
President's House finished with all convenient speed and frugality;" 4 
and on October 11 the Corporation voted "That y e Committee of 
y e Corporation do accordingly proceed to finish y e said President's 
House." 5 Soon thereafter President Wadsworth made this entry: 

27 Oct. 1726. This night some of our Family lodged at y e New-House 
built for y e President; Nov. 4 at night, was y e first time yt my wife & I 
lodg'd there. The House was not half finish'd within. 6 

On April 5, 1727, the Corporation voted that "y e Passage in y e 
Front- Yard of y e President's House, between y e Door & y e Gate be 
paved." 7 On September 17, 1728, the Corporation voted that "y e 
Committee for taking y e care of building y e President's House, be 
desired to get it railed in on y e top for security from fire." 8 On 
December 1, 1732, the Corporation appointed a committee "to 
Jnspect & examine y e Committees account of y e charges in building 
y e President's House, & to make report to y e Corporation." 9 Presi- 
dent Wadsworth having died on March 16, 1737, on the 18th the 
Corporation voted that "M rs Wadsworth be desired Still to continue 



1 Pp. 541-542, below. 

2 The memorial was presented to the House on August 25, when it was 
"Read. And the House entred into Consideration of the said Memorial, and 
the Question was put upon a Motion made, Whether a Committee should be sent 
to view the Building within mentioned? It pass'd in the Negative. Then the 
Question was put, Whether any further Allowance shall be made the Memorialists 
out of the Publick Treasury for the Use aforesaid? It pass'd in the Negative" 
(House Journal, pp. 4-5; cf. p. 545, below). "The General Court," dryly re- 
marked Quincy, "by paying one thousand out of eighteen hundred pounds of 
the cost, have enjoyed the credit, ever since, of building a house for the President 
of the College" (History, i. 382). 

3 P. 543, below. 

4 P. 544, below. 5 P. 544, below. 
6 Wadsworth's Diary, p. 37. 7 P. 550, below. 
8 P. 567, below. 9 P. 604, below. 



CXX INTRODUCTION 

her dwelling in the Presidents house and Jf she pleases til the College 
has other Occasion for it;" * and on the same day also voted that 
"M r Flynt be desired to receive into his care & Custody the College 
books and papers that are at the Presidents House." 2 On October 
26, 1737, the Corporation appointed a committee "to consider of the 
Repairs to be made at the Presid 18 House as to the Well, Pump, 
Kitchen Chimney & w* else they shall judge needful, and that they 
be empower 'd to do what is proper in those Affairs.'' 3 On April 6, 
1747, the Corporation appointed a committee "to enquire & make 
report, to the Corporation at their next Meeting, what will be the 
Cost of building a convenient Wood-House, at the Pres dts House;" 4 
and on September 7, 1747, the Corporation voted that "a Wood- 
house be built, at the Presidents House according to the Report of 
the Comittee." 5 

Wadsworth House was occupied from 1726 to 1849 by Presidents 
Wadsworth, Holyoke, Locke, Langdon, Willard, Webber, Kirkland, 
Quincy, and Everett; and Washington lived in it for a few days 
soon after his arrival at Cambridge in July, 1775. Mr. Everett 
continued to reside in it for some time after he ceased to be Presi- 
dent, in 1849; and since the time of his leaving it, it has been used 
as a students' boarding-house, as a dormitory, and for college offices, 
etc. The name "Wadsworth House" perhaps did not become 
attached to it until after it was abandoned as the presidential 
mansion. 6 



1 P. 653, below. 

2 P. 654, below. It seems probable from this entry that when Edward Holyoke 
became President later in the year, the "College books and papers" were returned 
to Wadsworth House. If this was so, then the preservation of most of the College 
Books when the second Harvard College was burned in 1764 is accounted for. 
Yet one of the Library Laws adopted May 20, 1736, specified that "y e College 
Records (except those of frequent use) shall be kept in a suitable strong Recepta- 
cle in y e Library, and y e Key thereof kept by y e President or senior resident 
Fellow" (p. 133, below). 

• P. 667, below. 

* P. 770, below. 
6 P. 778, below. 

6 See the Harvard Book, i. 137-142. In a letter dated August 10, 1872, 
Miss Eliza Susan Quincy wrote: "I am often asked the question, 'Is it possible, 
Miss Quincy, that you resided sixteen years in that house? You could not have 
kept a carriage, for there is no stable.' 'Yes, we did,' I reply: 'we had not only a 
stable and coach-house, but also a large garden and an extensive court-yard, 



HARVARD COLLEGE AND THE FIRST CHURCH, CAMBRIDGE Cxxi 

Holden Chapel 

The account of the College printed in London in 1643 stated that 
the first Harvard College had "a spacious Hall, where they daily 
meet" at commons, lectures, exercises, etc., 1 and there are many- 
allusions to this "Hall" or "College Hall," as it was variously called, 
in the extracts already given. 2 A similar College Hall was a chief 
feature of the second Harvard College and of the third Harvard 
College (the present Harvard Hall). Cotton Mather's reference to 
President Rogers's custom of being "somewhat Long in his Daily 
Prayers (which our Presidents used to make) with the Scholars in 
the College-Hall," has already been quoted; 3 and in another passage 
Mather wrote: 

While the President inspected the Manners of the Students thus En- 
tertained in the Colledge, and unto his Morning and Evening Prayers in 
the Hall, joined an Exposition upon the Chapters; which they Read out 
of Hebrew into Greek, from the Old Testament in the Morning, and out 
of English into Greek, from the New Testament in the Evening; besides 
what Sermons he saw cause to Preach in Publick Assemblies on the 
Lord's-Day at Cambridge, where the Students have a particular Gallery 
allotted unto them. 4 

There was from the early days a close relation between the College 
and the First Church in Cambridge. That this relation was estab- 
lished at the very beginning there is no reason to doubt, though, 
from the meagreness of the early records, the fact cannot be proved 
from the records themselves. Previous to 1750 the First Church 
had three meeting-houses. The first (1636-1650) stood in what is 



filled with trees and flowering shrubs, which are now cut down, or turned into 
the street" (1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, xii. 262). From 
this it would appear that in President Quincy's day the " garden" was in front 
of the house. In 1732 "the purchasing for ye College" certain "Lands adjoining 
to y e President's orchard" was mooted (pp. 599, 600, below); on June 14, 1743, 
the Corporation voted "That the Fence round the Pres dts Orchard be renew'd 
& repair'd as soon as may be" (p. 736, below); and the "Ditch in y e Presidents 
Orchard" is shown on a plan drawn by President Holyoke about 1765 (see Plan 
H, facing p. 260, below). In the inventory of 1654 the President's "barne" is 
mentioned" (p. 208, below). 

1 P. lxxii, above. 

2 See the index to these volumes. 

3 P. xcii, above. 

4 Magnalia (1702), bk. iv. pt. i. § 4, pp. 127-128. 



CXX11 INTRODUCTION 

now Dunster Street, a little south of the present Mt. Auburn Street. 
It had been built by the Hooker company in 1632, and was taken 
over by the First Church in 1636. There is in the records here 
printed no specific allusion to that meeting-house, but presumably 
it is referred to in the fifth of the College Laws of 1642-1646, which 
provided that "In the publike Church assembly" the students 
" shall carefully shunne all gestures that shew any contept or neglect 
of Gods ordinances ... & all Sophisters & Bachellors . . . shall 
publiquely repeate Sermons in y e Hall whenever they are called 
forth." * 

The second meeting-house (1650-1706) was on Watch House 
Hill. In the inventory of "the whole Estate" of Harvard College, 
taken December 10, 1654, is the item: "The East Gallery in Cambr. 
meeting house for the use of the Students vallued at 30 rt ." 2 On 
December 24, 1691, the Corporation ordered — 

That 5 U be allowed towards y e repairing of y e meeting house in Cambr. 
Provided y* this present allow shall not be drawn into A Presid 4 for y e 
future, & y* the Selectmen shall renounce all Expectations of such a 
thing for y e future. 3 

The third meeting-house (1706-1756) stood on or very near the 
same site as the second. 4 On September 28, 1703, the Corporation 
voted that " the Sum of Sixty pounds be Allowed out of the Colledg 
Treasury tow ds the building a New Meeting house in Cambridg." 5 
On August 6, 1706, the Corporation — 

1 P. 25, above. The word "Church" is interlined. 

2 P. 209, below. Another item in the same inventory mentions "Gallery 
room" (p. 210, below). 

3 P. 832, below. In 1686 there are allusions to "gallery money" (pp. 259, 
260, below). On August 30, 1708, the Corporation voted that "y e Gallery mony 
paid by every Schollar at his admission be six shillings" (p. 383, below). One 
of the College Laws of 1734 reads: "Every Scholar in the first Quarter Bill 
made up after his Admission, Shall be charged Six Shillings, to the Use of the 
College, for Gallery money" (p. 135, below). 

4 The College also contributed to the expense of the fourth meeting-house. 
This stood very near the site of the third; it was raised on November 17, 
1756; services were first held in it on July 24, 1757; and it was taken down in 
1S33, when the meeting-house lot, in the southwest corner of the present College 
Yard, was bought by the College. When the meeting-house of the First Parish 
was built in 1833 opposite Massachusetts Hall, the College contributed a portion 
of the expense. (Paige, History of Cambridge, pp. 293, 304.) 

6 P. 371, below. 



HAKVARD COLLEGE AND THE FIRST CHURCH, CAMBRIDGE CXX111 

Voted that M r Leverett w th the Treasurer take care for the building 
of a Pew for the Presidents Family in the meeting House now a building, 
& about the Students Seats in Said meeting House, the Charge of the 
Pew to be Defrayed out of the Collige Treasury. 1 

The Commencement exercises in 1707 were held in this building, 
and on July 2 Judge Sewall, referring to his son Joseph, who took his 
first degree on that day, wrote: "My Son was the first that had a 
Degree given him in the New Meetinghouse." 2 

On September 6, 1717, the Corporation — 

Voted, That the College wilbe ready to allow out of the Treasury one 
Seventh p* of the Charge of raising the Meeting house, and erecting an 
upper Tier of Gallerys; Provided, The Frontier Gallery that Now is, 
w th the two Wings, shal, as of right it ought to be, and as their necessity 
calls for it, be Surrendred to the Use of the Scholars, and So much room 
in the Side Gallery contiguous to the Front-Gallery afores d , as Shalbe 
equal to a Seventh p* of the New Galerys w ch shalbe Erected, be declared 
and Entred in the Town Book of Records as the right and pportionable 
p* of the Meeting-house belonging to the College and deliver'd to the 
Use of the s d College, as there shalbe Occasion therefor: The s d p* of the 
s d Side-Gallery to be taken & Set off square from front to Rear. 3 

On April 23, 1746, the Corporation, being informed that the parish 
" are about to repair s d Meeting-House " in a certain manner, voted — 

That, if the Parish shall actually make the Repairs above mention'd; 
This Corporation will consent to pay for the Windows in Their Gallery 
& clapboard the upper part of the Front of the Meeting-house from the 
Girt to the Plate, & also pay for the Window in the Pres dts Pew, & clap- 



1 P. 376, below. 

2 Diary, ii. 190. 



3 P. 437, below. On October 20, 1735, the Corporation took the following 
action: 

Whereas there is a good Stone Wall erected, & erecting, round y e Burying 
place in Cambridge, . . . and whereas there has a considerable regard had to 
y e College in building so good & handsome a Wall in y e Front; and y e College 
has us'd, and expects to make use of, y e Burying place as Providence gives 
occasion for it, therefore voted, yt as soon as the Stone Wall shall be compleated, 
y e Treasurer pay y e Sum of twenty five pounds to ... a Comittee for y e Town 
to take care of y e said Fence (p. 642, below). 

This is the old burial place at the corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Garden 
Street, sometimes called "God's Acre:" see Kittredge Anniversary Papers (1913), 
pp. 217-226; our Publications, xxiv. 293-296. 



CXX1V INTRODUCTION 

board behind s d Pew on the Backside of the Meeting-house (if s d part 
of the Meeting-house be new clapboarded) from the Sill to the Girt. 

Or if the Parish shall rather Choose, Jnstead of our making the Re- 
pairs of the above mentioned Parts, That We would give some certain 
Proportion of the s d Repairs of the s d House; We consent, That We will 
answer the seventh part of the whole repairs of the House, only requir- 
ing, That the Parish do inform the Corporation, before they enter upon 
the Repairs of s d House, w ch of these Proposals, They Choose to take up 
with. 1 

On October 11 the President was informed that the parish "Choose 
that the College shou'd answer a Seventh part of the whole repairs 
of the house rather than Make the particular Repairs mention'd in 
this Vote." 2 On August 26, 1747, the Corporation voted — 

That James Clarke the Sexton of the Meeting-House in Cambridge, 
be allow'd by the College three pounds old Ten 1 " p Annum, provided he 
shall take Care, That the Windows of the Scholars Gallery be shutt 
after Meetings and at other Times as there may be Occasion, And to 
Sweep the Scholars s d Gallery once p Month. 3 

It is thus seen that from the first the College made provision for 
daily prayers 4 in the main College building and for public worship 
in the meeting-house on Sundays, and that it bore its share in the 
expenses incident to the latter. 5 Those arrangements continued 
for a century, and it does not appear that there was any dissatis- 
faction with them or that the authorities desired the College to have 
a chapel of its own. Samuel Holden of Roehampton, Surrey, a 
wealthy London merchant, Member of Parliament, and Director 
of the Bank of England, 6 who had long been a familiar friend of the 

1 P. 757, below. 

2 P. 757, below. 
8 P. 775, below. 

4 For penalties imposed for tardiness or misbehavior at, or absence from, 
prayers, see the index to these volumes under that word. Cf. Harvard Book, 
ii. 120-146. 

6 Cf. Report on the Connection at various Times existing between the First 
Parish in Cambridge and Harvard College (1851), and Professor A. B. Hart's 
paper on "The Relations between Harvard College and the First Church in 
Cambridge," in 2 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, v. 396-416. 

6 In the Corporation records and elsewhere he is referred to as "Governor of 
the Bank of England; " but in the Gentleman's Magazine for 1740 he is called 
"Governor of the Russia Company, a Director of the Bank, and M.P. for East- 
low, Cornwall" (x. 317). 



HOLDEN CHAPEL (BUILT 1744) CXXV 

Rev. Dr. Benjamin Colman and had through the latter distributed 
in New England large sums in charity, died June 11, 1740, leaving a 
large property to his widow Jane and his daughters Priscilla, Jane, 
and Mary. In the following year Thomas Hutchinson was in London, 
met Mrs. Holden, and obtained from her and her daughters £400, 
which he apparently brought with him to Boston in December, 
1741. x On the 14th of that month, the Corporation took the fol- 
lowing action: 

Vote 1. That Wee thankfully Accept the Generous Offer of M ra 
Holden (Widow of M r Holden Merchant late of London & Govern 1 " of 
the Bank of England) & her Dau'ters. viz. of Four hundred pounds 
Ster 1 to Harvard College to Build a Chappel for the Use of s d College & 
That the Pres dt be desir'd to write to Her accordingly. 

Vote 2. That the Thanks of the Corporation be given to Mr. Thomas 
Hutchinson M.A. & Merch* in Boston, for his good Offices in proposing 
to M rs Holden the Appropriation of her Bounty (as mention'd in the 
preceeding Vote) to Harv. College. 2 

It is not a little singular that President Holyoke, whose Diary in 
interleaved almanacs from 1709 to 1768 has been preserved, does 
not once mention Holden Chapel while it was being built, and only 
twice thereafter. 3 Fortunately, however, his son Edward Augustus 
Holyoke, of the Class of 1746, noted progress on the work. June 2, 
1742: "Foundation of the Chapel Laid Some part of y e begin'g of 
this month. ,, December 18-20: "Sometime this part of the month, 
the brick-work of the Chapel was finish d ." February 19, 1743: 
"The Slates for the chapel were begun to be cut in order to be put on 
it." March 4: "Last night Late they begun to slate Chapel. ,, 
March 7: "The workmen at y e Chapel didn't come up till y e next 
day." March 12: "Y e workmen went down from y e chappie & re- 
turn 11 on the Moonday following." March 28: "Workmfen] were 



1 See letters of Isaac Watts, in 2 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical So- 
ciety, ix. 337, 382, 383, 386, 388, 390, 393, 396; Harvard Book, i. 58-60; Samuel 
F. Batchelder's paper on "The Singular Story of Holden Chapel," in his Bits of 
Harvard History (1924), pp. 1-33. 

2 P. 715, below. 

3 On February 19, 1760, he noted: "Mr. Flynt buried & funeral Oration in 
the Chapel p r M r Lovell;" and on January 23, 1764: "This Day Hollis Hall 
was named by Govern 1 Fra. Bernard in the Presence of the Gen 1 Court both 
Council & House in the Chapel" (Holyoke Diaries, pp. 22, 27). 



CXXV1 INTRODUCTION 

not up all day." May 31: "Finish d Plaisering Chappel." Finally, 
on February 26, 1744, Dr. Holyoke noted that "Workmen came to 
finish the Chappel." l 

On September 3, 1744, the Corporation voted that "Stone Steps 
att the great Door of y e Chapell be procurd & also the two Pews 
design'd for the Overseers be made, at the College Charge." 2 On 
May 21, 1750, order was given in regard to the "Glazing Work." z 

In 1749 Dr. William Douglass, a Scotsman who had lived in 
Boston for more than thirty years, wrote: 

The College-Building consists of a Court built on three Sides, the 
Front being open to the Fields; the Building on the first Side was by a 
Contribution, 1672, ... it was called by the former Name Harvard 
College; the Building on the Bottom Side was erected Anno 1699, at the 
Charge of Lieut.-Governor Stoughton, and is called Stoughton-College, 
consisting of 16 Chambers, Garrett Chambers included; the third Side 
was built Anno 1720 at the Charge of the Province, and is called Massa- 
chusetts-Hall, consisting of 32 Chambers. Besides this Court there is a 
House [Wadsworth House] for the President at some Distance from the 
Court, and at a small Distance behind the Harvard Side of the Court is 
a neat Chapel the Gift of Mrs. Holden of London, Widow of Mr. Holden 
a late Director of the Bank of England* 

This section dealing with the College buildings acquired, pur- 
chased, or erected by or for the College before 1750 may appro- 
priately close with two lists — the first chronological, the second 
showing what buildings were in existence in any particular year. 5 
Some of the dates are necessarily conjectural. 6 



1 Holyoke Diaries, pp. 32, 33, 34, 36. 

2 P. 748, below. 

3 P. 818, below. 

* Summary, i. 543-544. On October 25, 1750, Capt. Francis Goelet visited 
Cambridge, which he described as "a neat Pleasant Village and Consists of ab* 
an Hundred Houses and three Collages, which are a Plain Old Fabrick of no 
manner of Archctect and the Present much Out of Repair, ... its Apartments 
are Pretty Large The Library is very Large and well Stored with Books, but 
much Abused by Frequent use. . . . Drank a Glass Wine with the Collegians" 
(Xew England Historical and Genealogical Register, xxiv. 60). 

6 For buildings other than those described in the text, see the index to these 
volumes under "College buildings." 

6 The dates of raising and of first occupation are given in those cases where 
they arc known. 



LIST OF COLLEGE BUILDINGS, 1637-1750 CXXvil 

I 

First President's House: Peyntree House 1637-1641 

First Harvard College 1 1642-1679 

Second President's House: Dunster's House 2 1645-1680 

Goffe's College 1651-1660 

Indian College 3 1655-1698 

Second Harvard College 4 1677-1764 

Third President's House 1680-1719 

Stoughton College 1699-1781 

Massachusetts Hall 5 1720 

Fourth President's House: Wadsworth House 6 1726 

Holden Chapel 7 1744 

II 

1637-1641 First President's House: Peyntree House 

1642-1644 First Harvard College 

■taAz 10m f First Harvard College 

1645-1650 1 _ _ _ . _ , _° _ , __ 

[ becond President s House : Dunster s House 

(First Harvard College 
Second President's House: Dunster's House 
Goffe's College 



1 The building was presumably begun before September 7, 1638 (p. Ixx, above) ; 
the frame was "already raised" in 1639 (p. 172, below); and the building was first 
occupied in September, 1642 (p. lxxii, above). Attention may be called to the fact 
that the time-honored Americanism "College Yard," once common throughout 
the country but now displaced practically everywhere except at Harvard by 
"Campus," occurs at Cambridge as early as 1639 (p. 172, below; cf. our Pub- 
lications, iii. 431-437; Harvard Graduates' Magazine, March, 1903, xi. 375- 
377). 

2 On November 13, 1644, the General Court appropriated money for this 
house, but presumably it was not ready for occupancy until 1645. 

3 This building was perhaps begun in 1653 or 1654, but probably it was not 
occupied until 1655. 

4 The frame was raised on August 7, 1674 (p. lxxxvi, above) ; books were trans- 
ferred from the first Harvard College to the library of the second Harvard College 
in 1676 (p. lxxxvi, above) ; by 1677 the library was completely finished (p. lxxxviii, 
above), and the Commencement exercises were held in the building (p. lxxxviii, 
above). 

6 Begun in or about 1719, but not occupied until 1720 (p. cii, above). 

6 The frame was raised May 24, the house was first occupied October 27, and 
President Wadsworth moved in on November 4, 1726 (pp. cxviii, cxix, above). 

7 The foundation was laid in June, 1742, but the building was not finished 
until 1744 (pp. cxxv-cxxvi, above). It was abandoned as a chapel in 1766 (S. F. 
Batchelder, Bits of Harvard History, p. 16). 



CXXV111 



INTRODUCTION 



1655-1660 



1661-1676 



1677-1679 



1680-1698 



1699-1719 



1720-1725 



1726-1743 



1744-1750 



First Harvard College 
Second President's House: 
GofiVs College 
Indian College 
First Harvard College 
Second President's House: 
Indian College 
First Harvard College 
Second President's House : 
Indian College 
Second Harvard College 
Indian College 
Second Harvard College 
Third President's House 
Second Harvard College 
Third President's House 
Stoughton College 
Second Harvard College 
Stoughton College 
Massachusetts Hall 
Second Harvard College 
Stoughton College 
Massachusetts Hall 
Fourth President's House: 
Second Harvard College 
Stoughton College 
Massachusetts Hall 
Fourth President's House: 
Holden Chapel 



Dunster's House 



Dunster's House 



Dunster's House 



Wadsworth House 



Wadsworth House 



The Words "College" and "Hall" 1 

It is important to know exactly what the Harvard usage in 
regard to the words College and Hall has been. In the previous 
section eleven buildings were described, in six of which students 

1 Tliis section is based on two papers by the Editor: "On the Use of the Words 
College and Hall in the United States," in Dialect Notes, 1900, ii. 91-114; and 
"Harvard Terms: 'College' and 'Hall,'" in the Harvard Graduates' Magazine, 
December, 1904, xiii. 244-246. See also the discussion in the Nation for Octo- 
ber 24, November 7, 14, 21, 28, 1895, Ixi. 293, 327, 346, 362, 387; and Harvard 
Graduates' Magazine (1894), iii. 1-8, (1904) xii. 528, (1921) xxix. 365-371. 



THE WORDS COLLEGE" AND "HALL 7 CXX1X 

were lodged. In the last half of the eighteenth century only 
two buildings were erected — Hollis Hall and the third Harvard 
College (the present Harvard Hall). Of those eight buildings, five 
(GofiVs College, 1 Indian College, Stoughton College, Massachusetts 
Hall, and Hollis Hall) were merely dormitories; one (the present 
Harvard Hall) has never been used for a dormitory; and only two — 
the first Harvard College and the second Harvard College — were 
residential halls. The second of these was built to replace the first, 
and no doubt when commons were transferred in or about 1677 from 
the first Harvard College to the second Harvard College, the first 
Harvard College, even if it was not at once taken down, ceased to be 
a residential hall. In short, for a period of about a century and a 
quarter there was but one residential hall; and with the destruction 
of the second Harvard College in 1764, the residential hall dis- 
appeared at Harvard, only to be revived exactly a century and a 
half later when the Freshman dormitories were opened in 1914. But 
though students lodge and board in the Freshman dormitories, yet 
these buildings do not serve precisely the same purpose as did the 
first Harvard College and the second Harvard College. 

It is abundantly clear from the extracts quoted in the previous 
section that the word College was from 1636 to 1720 applied to every 
building in succession except the President's House. With the 
appearance of Massachusetts in 1720, there also appeared a new 
word — Hall. Why a new term should have been introduced, it is 
impossible to say; probably it was one of those changes in nomen- 
clature which so frequently occur and yet for which no adequate 
reason can be assigned. 2 From 1720 to 1781 the words College and 



1 Goffe's College had a kitchen (p. lxxviii, above), but that was merely because 
it had previously been a private house. From 1642 to 1814 commons were 
served only in the three buildings to each of which the name Harvard College 
(or Hall) was attached, except that between the burning of the second Harvard 
College in 1764 and the completion of the present Harvard Hall, two rooms in 
Hollis Hall were assigned as dining rooms (our Publications, x. 35 note 1). 

2 It was hazarded in 1699 by Cotton Mather, who in the dedication to his 
Decennium Luctuosum wrote: "The Nameless Writer of this History may Re- 
port, that with a greater Expence than that of the First Founder, this Honourable 
Person" — William Stoughton — "proves that he Loves our Nation, by Building 
us another Edifice for the Supply of all our Synagogues, and STOUGHTON- 
HALL outshines HARVARD-COLLEDGE " (Magnalia, 1702, bk. vii. app. 
p. 58). But that was merely a chance use of the word. While in course of erec- 



t'XXX INTRODUCTION 

Hall were used indifferently; but with the demolition of Stoughton 
College in 1781 the word College in the sense of a single building 
disappeared from Cambridge * as an official designation, though it 
has remained in popular and colloquial use to the present day in the 
phrase "the colleges." 2 

The statement that "there is evidence that each of the seven- 
teenth century buildings contained the chambers necessary for such 
physical wants of the students as they were allowed to gratify in 
those days — chambers, studies, a dining hall, etc.," 3 is in direct 

tion, Massachusetts Hall was frequently called "College" or "New College," 
and apparently the name Massachusetts Hall first appeared on November 4, 
1720 (see p. cii, above). 

It has already been pointed out (p. Ixxxix note 3, above) that the term "the 
House" was often employed before 1750 in the sense of the institution. Occa- 
sionally the word House is found applied to a building. Thus in 1707 "the 
2 Houses" (p. 378, below) meant the second Harvard College and Stoughton 
College; in 1721 "the House" (p. 456) meant Massachusetts Hall and "the sd 
House" (pp. 458, 459) meant Stoughton College; in 1732 "the said House" 
(p. 598, below) meant the second Harvard College; and in 1750 "y e several 
Houses" (p. 821) meant the second Harvard College, Stoughton College, and 
Massachusetts Hall. It is rather surprising that the word House did not come 
into use as a colloquial or even as an official designation for a specific building, 
but it does not appear to have done so, except in the case of the building built 
for or occupied by the President. There is, however, an allusion (in 1721) to 
"Stoughton House" (p. 460, below). At a much later period the word was in 
official use for certain dormitories, as in College House and Holyoke House. 

1 But though College in this sense was not used as an official designation in 
Cambridge after 1781, curiously enough it was later employed in Boston. Early 
in the nineteenth century the Medical School needed a building, money was 
raised by subscription, a grant was obtained from the State, and "in 1816, the 
building erected in Mason Street [Boston] was opened for lectures, under the 
name of the 'Massachusetts Medical College.'" This building proving insuffi- 
cient after forty years, Dr. George Parkman offered "a piece of land in North 
Grove Street as a site for a Medical College, . . . the estate in Mason Street 
was sold . . . and the new structure, known, as was the former one, under the 
name of the Massachusetts Medical College, was ready for occupation in the 
autumn of 1846" (Dr. O. W. Holmes, in Harvard Book, i. 242, 245). 

2 "Yesterday," wrote Charles Sumner on October 24, 1832, "Dane Law 
College . . . , a beautiful Grecian Temple, . . . was dedicated to the law" 
(in Memoir and Letters, 1878, i. 116). "The two friends," remarked William W. 
Story in 1851, "lived together in the upper story of the south-easterly corner of 
Massachusetts College" (Life of Joseph Story, i. 47). Perhaps that was the 
last time the word College was applied to a specific building in Cambridge; but 
such an expression (written about 1894) as Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes's "I was 
born close to the colleges" (in Life and Letters, 1896, i. 39) is still heard. 

* Nation, lxi. 293. 



THE WORDS COLLEGE AND HALL CXXX1 

conflict with the descriptions of those buildings given in the pre- 
vious section; and the belief that "the final substitution of the 
word hall for such buildings as Hollis and Stoughton coincides 
roughly with the elimination of the kitchen and buttery," 1 is 
totally at variance with the facts adduced above, which show that 
the presence or absence of a kitchen and buttery had nothing to 
do with the name by which a building was designated — whether 
College or Hall. In short, there is no foundation for the notion that 
the use of the word College at Harvard ever had any reference to the 
English system of separate colleges. 2 

The buildings of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were 
often referred to not by a specific name but as "Old College' ' or 
"New College/' and hence the same designation was applied to three 
or four different buildings in turn. Thus as early as 1654, Goffe's 
College having been bought in or about 1651, the first Harvard 
College was already known as "the Old College." Again, the second 
Harvard College, Stoughton College, Massachusetts Hall, Hollis 
Hall, and the third Harvard College (the present Harvard Hall), 
were each frequently called "the New College" or "the Old College," 
as the case might be. And to make confusion worse confounded the 
same name, "Harvard College," besides designating the institution 
as a whole, was applied to no less than three distinct buildings. 3 This 
confusion in nomenclature makes it sometimes difficult to know with 
certainty exactly what building is intended. 4 



1 Nation, lxi. 364. 

2 It should be pointed out that English writers of the seventeenth and eight- 
eenth centuries, such as Richard Blome, Daniel Neal, John Ogilby, John Old- 
mixon, etc., who had never visited this country, did not understand the situation, 
were clearly puzzled, and mistakenly attributed to Harvard the English system of 
separate colleges; and that hence what they say, being necessarily taken from 
other writers, must be received with caution. 

3 Harvard historians have not always been careful to distinguish between these 
three buildings, and hence some writers have been misled into thinking that 
what Quincy labelled "First Harvard Hall" in the "List of Engravings" in the 
first volume of his History (p. xxiv), and which is reproduced with the same 
label in the Harvard Book, i. 72, was the building erected in 1638-1642, whereas 
it was the second Harvard College (1677-1764). 

4 In the index to these volumes, an attempt has been made to indicate in each 
case the building referred to, but the reader should be warned that mistakes have 
perhaps been made. * 



cxxx11 introduction 

The Word "Fellow" 

In these records there is no allusion during the years 1637-1639 
to any instructor other than Nathaniel Eaton, but that he had two 
assistants is learned from Governor Winthrop, who applied the word 
"usher" to them. 1 After the coming of Henry Dunster in August, 
1640, he apparently taught without assistance for over three years; 
but on December 27, 1643, the Overseers ordered that "2 Batchelours 
shall be chosen for the p r sent helpe of the p r sident, to read to the 
Junior pupills as the p r sident shall see fitt," and John Bulkley and 
George Downing, both of the Class of 1642, were "appoynted for 
that service to continue for this yeare." 2 Some years later — 
exactly how many is not known, but presumably not before 1650 
and possibly much later 3 — Thomas Danforth paraphrased the 
entry of December 27, 1643, saying that "Also it was then ordered 
that two Batchelo r s should be appoynted to help the President to 
read to the Jun r Pupills." 4 And in an account in Danforth's hand 
(undated but apparently covering the years 1643-1650) of "The 
distribution made of the moneys given from the several colony es," 
the sum of £56.13.8 is entered against "m r Samuel Danforth, Read r 
& fellow 6 yeares." 5 There is no evidence, other than these ex- 
tracts, that the words "usher," "help," and "reader" were ever in 
actual use. But, however that may have been, it is certain that the 
word Tutor was soon introduced, for it is found in the College Laws 
of 1642-1646; 6 in 1643; 7 on March 28, 1650; 8 and on May 6, 1650. 9 
But in addition to the word Tutor, the word Fellow occurs on Jan- 



1 Winthrop wrote that Eaton "had entertained one Nathaniel Briscoe, a 
gentleman born, to be his usher, and to do some other things for him, which 
might not be unfit for a scholar;" and that "it was testified by another of his 
ushers and divers of his scholars," etc. (History of New England, 1853, i. 171, 
172). 

2 P. 17, below. 

3 See p. lxxi note 1, above. 

4 P. 175, below. 

6 P. 180, below. Cf. p. cxxxiii note 6, below. 

6 Pp. 25, 26, 27, 188, 189, below. The Latin version has "Tutores" (pp. 29, 
30, 31, below). Whether the College Laws of 1642-1646 were originally written 
in Latin or in English is not known; but the point is immaterial, since there are 
other instances of Tutor before May 31, 1650. 

7 See p. lxxv, above. 

8 P. 35, below. 

9 Pp. 27, 190, below. 



THE WOKD FELLOW CXXxiii 

uary 13, 1647; 1 in July, 1647; 2 on November 11, 1647; 3 on May 10, 
1649; 4 on March 28, 1650; 5 and on May 6, 1650. 6 

It appears, then, that the words Tutor and Fellow were employed, 
apparently without distinction, for several years before the granting 
on May 31, 1650, of the first College Charter. In this the word Fellow 
was used in a new, specific, and hitherto (either in England or at 
Harvard) unknown sense — namely, as designating one of the five 
persons who, in addition to the President and the Treasurer, made 
up the Corporation. Had the word Fellow henceforth been used 
only in its technical sense of one of the five members of the Cor- 
poration so called, much confusion would have been avoided, but 
unfortunately such was far from being the case. From 1650 to 1692 
all the Tutors were Fellows of the Corporation, though not all 
Fellows of the Corporation were Tutors; and it was customary to 
call a Tutor either Tutor or Fellow. More than once during that 
period the number of Fellows fell below the five specified in the 
charter, and on such occasions the Corporation was requested by 
the Overseers to fill up the vacancy or vacancies, which was done 
by the election either of a young graduate who was to be a Tutor or 
of an older man who did not teach, who did not receive a salary, 
and who did not reside at the College. After 1692 no Tutor was 
necessarily a Fellow of the Corporation, except in the years 1700- 
1708, when, under the Charter of 1700, "the two senior Tutors 

1 P. 24, below. 

2 Plymouth Colony Records, ix. 94, 95. The word "fellowship" also occurs 
in this document, for other instances of which see the index to these volumes. 

8 Massachusetts Colony Records, ii. 221. 

4 Will of Matthew Day: "I doe giue with all my heart all that part I haue 
in the Garden unto the fellowes of Harvard Colledge for euer" (Middlesex Deeds, 
i. 2). Here we have by implication the term "Fellows' Orchard," though that 
term itself is not found until after 1650. Part of the garden had been given to 
the College by John Bulkley in 1645 (pp. 201, 205-206, below). For the location 
of the Fellows' Orchard, which was bounded on the east by the parsonage lot, see 
the plan facing p. lxviii, above. 

5 Pp. 33, 34, below. 

6 Pp. 27, 190, below. In an account of "The distribution made of the moneys 
given from the several colony es" (p. 180, below), apparently for the years 
1643-1650, the word "Fellow" occurs half a dozen times and the word "fel- 
lowship" once; but that account is in the hand of Thomas Danforth, the 
original from which it was copied is not extant, and so it cannot be accepted as 
proof that the word Fellow was actually in use before 1650: see p. lxxi note 1, 
above. 



CXXX1V INTRODUCTION 

resident at the said College for the time being " were Fellows of the 
Corporation; but as a matter of fact, except during the years 
1697-1700, when Tutors were wholly excluded from the Corporation, 
from 1692 to 1780 always one Tutor and sometimes two Tutors 
were also Fellows of the Corporation. Hence arose the necessity of 
distinguishing between a Fellow of the Corporation who was also 
a Tutor and a Fellow of the Corporation who was not a Tutor — for, 
strangely enough, one of either class was still called a Fellow. 

The distinguishing designations were many, among them the 
following: 

Fellow 

Fellow of Harvard College 

Fellow of Harvard College residing in Cambridge 

Fellow of the College 

Fellow of the College residing in Cambridge 

Fellow of the Corporation 

Fellow of the Corporation residing in Cambridge 

Fellow of the House 

Fellow resident at (or in) the College 

Fellow residing in Cambridge 

Fellow to officiate on the place 

Fellow upon the place 

Non-resident Fellow 

Non-resident Fellow of the College 

Non-resident Fellow of this House 

Resident Fellow 

Resident Fellow in the House l 

This multiplicity of designations would be confusing, even if each 
designation had always been used in the same sense; but unfortu- 
nately there was no uniformity in that respect, and a term which in 
one place meant one thing, in another place meant something quite 
different. Thus, to take two instances only, the term " Fellow of the 
College" appears to have meant in most cases a Tutor, yet oc- 
casionally was applied to a Fellow of the Corporation. 2 Again, the 
term "Fellow of the House," when first used in these records on 
January 14, 1708, meant Fellow of the Corporation, 3 and the term 



1 Something like thirty-five variations will be found in the index to these 
volumes under Fellow. The terms "Probationer" and "Probationer Fellow" 
also occur. Under Tutor will be found in the index to these volumes a dozen or 
more designations. 

2 P. 237, below. 
■ P. 381, below. 



THE WORD FELLOW CXXXV 

was again used in the same sense on January 26, 1708; } but on 
April 28, 1712, it was applied to a Tutor only, 2 and thereafter the 
term usually, if not always, meant a Tutor who was not also a 
Fellow of the Corporation. On May 30, 1720, the three Tutors 
Henry Flynt, Nicholas Sever, and Thomas Robie — of whom Flynt 
was also a Fellow of the Corporation, but the other two were Tutors 
only — presented a memorial in which they claimed seats in the Cor- 
poration on the ground that they were Fellows in the technical sense 
in which that word was used in the Charter of 1650. A short time 
before that, on May 24, a fourth Tutor had been chosen by the 
Corporation in the person of William Welsteed, but his appointment 
was not confirmed by the Overseers until June 23, 3 and so Welsteed's 
name was not attached to that first memorial. But in the years 
1721-1723 Sever and Welsteed presented other petitions to the same 
effect, though, for what reason is not known, they were not joined 
by Flynt and Robie. On August 23, 1723, the Corporation presented 
its final memorial 4 to Lieutenant-Governor Dummer and the Council, 
the petition of the Tutors was dismissed by the Council, and the 
controversy came to an end. 5 Notwithstanding that fact, however, 
one or two Tutors were always Fellows of the Corporation down to 
1780, after which no Tutor was elected to the Corporation. 6 

In the index to these volumes, against the name of every person 
chosen a College officer is given the name of the office and date of 
election; and in the case of Fellows and Tutors an attempt has been 
made to distinguish between the two terms and to employ the word 
Fellow, only when the person was chosen a Fellow of the Corporation; 
and the word Tutor, only when he was chosen a Tutor. 

Identifications 

The most difficult editorial problem presented by these records is 
that of identification. It was soon found that, before the index 
could even be begun, it was essential to obtain, if possible, accurate 



1 P. 382, below. 2 P. 401, below. 

3 Pp. 449, 450, below. 4 Pp. 489-500, below. 

5 For a detailed discussion and for the evidence on which this section is based, 
see the Editor's paper on "A Famous Harvard Controversy, 1720-1723," in our 
Publications, xxv. 254. 

6 For tables giving the number of Tutors from 1650 to 1750, and the number 
of resident Fellows from 1650 to 1780, see p. lxvii, above. 



CXXXV1 INTRODUCTION 

answers to four questions: (1) On what day did Commencement fall 
in each year? (2) Precisely who were temporary students? (3) What 
was the full name of each student? (4) How were the students placed? 
Unfortunately a definitive answer cannot be given to a single one 
of these questions, though approximate answers can be hazarded. 

(1) The exact date of Commencement Day in each year is re- 
quired, because as that day fell was to be determined the identity 
of certain students. Thus on May 6, 1728, it was voted "that 
Rogers . . . shall have four pounds ten shillings" from a certain 
fund. 1 During that year there were or may have been at College no 
fewer than five Rogerses, namely: Daniel (1707-1785), Daniel 
(1706-1782), and Samuel, all in the Class of 1725; John, in the 
Class of 1728; and John (1712-1789), in the Class of 1732. Com- 
mencement came on June 28. As the vote was passed before June 
28, it follows that the Rogers in question was John Rogers of the 
Class of 1728. Had the vote been passed after June 28, then the stu- 
dent receiving the money would have been John Rogers of the 
Class of 1732. If the vote had been passed after June 28 and it had 
been the intention of the Corporation to bestow the exhibition on 
John Rogers of the Class of 1728, then the money would have been 
voted to " Sir Rogers." If the money had been voted to " Sir Rogers " 
before June 28, or to "Mr. Rogers" after June 28, then the recipient 
would have been one of the three Rogerses who were members of the 
Class of 1725. 2 

(2) There occur in these records the names of several students 
not found in the Quinquennial Catalogue. Who were such students? 
The remissness of the College authorities for nearly two centuries in 
regard to matriculations is at once extraordinary and inexplicable. 
It was not until 1725 that the names of members of the entering class 
were recorded, beginning with the Class that graduated in 1729; 3 



1 P. 5G1, below. 

2 There are many instances where graduates, even after taking their A.M., 
remained in residence. Thus, of those mentioned in the text, Daniel Rogers 
(170G-1782) was still in residence on September 8, 1729; while Daniel Rogers 
(1707-1785) remained in residence as late as April 11, 1732 — or seven years 
after graduation, when he became a Tutor. Probably most of those who remained 
in residence were pursuing theological studies, awaiting a call to some pastorate. 

3 The name of each student is entered in full in the Faculty Records for the 
Classes of 1729, 1731-1804; but for the Class of 1730, only the surname of each 



IDENTIFICATIONS CXXXV11 

with the Class graduating in 1732, the residence and year of age at 
entrance were first given; and with the Class graduating in 1741, the 
residence and full date of birth were first given. But often the names 
were not recorded until the Freshman Class had been in College for 
many months, occasionally for almost a year, 1 and if meanwhile a 
Freshman died or left College, his name was not included in the list. 
Again, if a student entered a certain class after the names of the 
members of that class had been recorded, his name was not inserted. 2 
And it was not until 1823 that a student was compelled to sign a 
book at entrance. Hence, singular as it may seem, a complete list 
of Harvard students previous to 1823 cannot be compiled. From 
various sources — most of them, of course, from the Faculty Records 
or the Corporation Records or the Overseer's Records, but not a few 
(some of which do not appear in the College records themselves) 
from letters, diaries, journals, epitaphs, genealogies, probate files, 
and newspapers — the names of about four hundred temporary 
students from 1639 to 1800 have been obtained. 3 

The term " temporary student " is not a precise one. Such students 
may be divided into the following five groups : 

(a) Students who died while undergraduates. 

(b) Students who left College, either voluntarily or involuntarily, 

student is given. One entry under that Class reads: "Vial; dead. 1729," the name 
in the hand of Tutor Flynt, the rest in that of President Wadsworth. This was 
Benjamin Viall (1710-1729), who died August 11, 1729: see our Publications, 
xviii. 82, 83. 

The christian names are in English for the Classes of 1729, 1731-1764, 1772- 
1804; but for those of 1765-1771, the christian names have been Latinized. In 
the Classes of 1729, 1731-1740, 1772, and 1775-1777, the surname is in each 
case written last; but in the Classes of 1741-1771, 1773, 1774, and 1778-1804, 
the surname is written first, usually with no comma following it. In the latter 
case, it is easy to confuse the two names; and it has occasionally happened that 
a ghost-name has been recorded as a student at Harvard. Thus Felt, in his 
Annals of Salem (2nd ed., 1845, i. 492; cf. ii. 663-664), was misled by a corre- 
spondent into including among those who did not graduate "Ely Justin 1755" — 
an error for Justin Ely of the Class of 1759. 

1 See p. cxli note 1, below. 

2 This statement covers two cases: that of a Freshman who entered after his 
class had been placed; and that of a student who at entrance was admitted to an 
upper class. In the latter case, however, it was customary, generally after 1760 
and sometimes before that date, to enter the fact somewhere in the Faculty 
Records, though such entries can be found only after diligent search. 

3 See the Editor's "Tentative Lists of Temporary Students at Harvard 
College, 1639-1800," in our Publications, xvii. 271-285. 



CXXXV111 INTRODUCTION 

who never returned, and who never received degrees either out of 
course or honorary. 

(c) Students who left College, for whatever reason, who never 
returned, who never received degrees out of course, but who did later 
receive honorary degrees. 1 

(d) Students who left College, for whatever reason, but later 
returned either to the same class or to a subsequent class, and who 
duly graduated. 2 

(e) Students who left College, for whatever reason, and later 
received degrees out of course. 3 

Students who come under groups (a), (b), and (c) are held to be 
temporary students; but those who come under (d) and (e) are not 
regarded as temporary students. The reason for this distinction is 
as follows. No one can receive a degree out of course who has not 
at some time been an undergraduate. Consequently, the inclusion 
of a man's name in the Quinquennial Catalogue under the heading 



1 Thus, George Cabot entered in 1766 with the Class of 1770; left College 
March 19, 1768; never returned; but in 1779 received the honorary degree of A.M. 

2 Thus, Edward Bates entered in 1732 with the Class of 1736; left College in 
1733; returned September 10, 1735, being admitted to the Sophomore Class; and 
duly graduated in the Class of 1738 as of the Class of 1738. Again, Jonathan 
Whitaker entered in 1793 with the Class of 1797; left College September 12, 
1793; returned the following December; and duly graduated with his Class in 
1797. Once more, of seven students who entered in 1766 with the Class of 1770, 
three were rusticated and four were expelled; but all seven were later readmitted 
into the Class of 1771 and duly received their degrees in 1771 as of the Class 
of 1771. 

3 Two remarkable cases are given in the two succeeding footnotes. 

A curious fact is that the Quinquennial contains the names of several students 
who never received the A.B. degree at all. Three instances may be given. Eb- 
enezer Hartshorn (cf . our Publications, xviii. 339 note 1, xix. 290 note 3) entered 
in the Class of 1732; left College; in 1737 was given an A.M., and his name is 
printed under his Class of 1732. George Erving entered in the Class of 1757; 
left College; in 1762 obtained an A.M. from the University of Glasgow; was 
admitted to the same degree (ad eundem) at Harvard in 1762, and his name is 
printed under the Class of 1757. Amos Windship (cf. our Publications, xviii. 
339 note 1, xxv. 144, 144 note 3, 150 note 1, 162 note 2) entered in 1767 in the 
Class of 1771; left College July 27, 1768; never returned; yet in 1790 was given 
the degrees of A.M. and M.B. and his name "inserted in the Class to which he 
belonged;" and in 1811 he received the degree of M.D. On August 19, 1830, 
the Corporation voted "That in the present number of Colleges in the United 
States, & variety of studies required in them, that it is inexpedient to grant 
generally, degrees ad eundem" (Corporation Records, p. 186). 



IDENTIFICATIONS CXXxix 

"Bachelors of Arts" shows that the man must at one time have been 
a student, even though — as in one case — the degree was conferred 
out of course no less than sixty-eight years later, 1 or — as in another 
case — the degree was conferred eighty years after the man left 
College and twenty-one years after his death. 2 On the other hand, 
the inclusion of a man's name in the Quinquennial Catalogue under 
the heading "Honorary Degrees" conveys no information as to 
whether the man had or had not been a temporary student at 
Harvard College. 3 

In the index to these volumes, the name of every graduate is 
followed by the date of his class in Roman type within parentheses, 
but in the case of temporary students — those who come under 
groups (a), (6), and (c) — the date is printed in italic type. The 
class to which a temporary student is assigned is sometimes con- 
jectural, and in such cases a question mark is added. 

(3) One of the College Laws of 1642-1646 reads as follows: 

15. Every Scholar shall bee called by his Sirname onely till hee bee 
invested with his first degree; except hee bee fellow-commoner or a 
Knights Eldest Sonne or of superiour Nobility. 4 

The privileged class of fellow-commoners survived for very nearly 
if not quite a century, 5 but, with a single exception, the eldest sons of 



1 Thomas Lee entered in 1794 with the Class of 1798; left College April 17, 
1797; never returned; and in 1866 was given the degree of A.B. as of the Class of 
1798. 

2 Edmund Trowbridge Dana entered in 1795 with the Class of 1799; left 
College in April, 1799; never returned; died May 6, 1858; and in 1879 was given 
the degree of A.B. as of the Class of 1799. 

3 The case of George Cabot has already been cited (p. cxxxviii note 1, above). 
Another is that of Jeremiah Smith, who entered in 1777 in the Class of 1781; 
left College in 1779; graduated at Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1780; and 
in 1807 received from Harvard the honorary degree of LL.D. 

4 P. 26, below. 

6 The ninth in the Laws of 1767 is "Of Graduates and Fellow-Commoners" 
(see Mr. Lane's list of "Manuscript Laws of Harvard College," in our Publica- 
tions, xxv. 244-253). This is an interesting case of the survival of a term long 
after the disappearance of the thing it denoted. For apparently the last fellow- 
commoner at Harvard left with the Class of 1733. In the previous ninety years, 
eight graduates and one temporary student had been fellow-commoners. The 
graduates were: Samuel Willis of 1653, Nathaniel Saltonstall of 1659, Joseph 
Browne of 1666, Edward Pelham of 1673, Francis Wainwright of 1686, Samuel 
Browne of 1727, John Vassall of 1732, and William Vassall of 1733; the temporary 



Cxi INTRODUCTION 

knights l and those "of superior Nobility" never darkened Harvard's 
doors. On taking his first degree, or A.B., a scholar was, following the 
practice at English universities, called " Dominus " 2 or " Sir/' the latter 
designation remaining in use down to the first decade of the nine- 
teenth century. 3 On taking his second degree, or A.M., the quondam 
student was called "Mr." The above law — which, unfortunately, 
was seldom violated — has made extraordinarily difficult the identi- 
fication of students when, as was often the case, there were at College 
at the same time two or more of the same surname. If there were 
only two such students, one had "Senior" ("Sr.," "S r ") appended to 
his name, the other "Junior" ("Jr.," " J r "). But if there were more 
than two of the same surname, then they were differentiated by the 
addition to their names of "l 3t ," "2 nd ," "3 rd ," etc., or sometimes 
"Primus," "Secundus," "Tertius," etc., often abbreviated. 

With regard to the abbreviation "S r ," a word of explanation is 
necessary. When "S r " followed a name, it was an abbreviation of 
"Senior;" but when it preceded a name, it was an abbreviation of 
"Sir" — that is, the title, as stated above, applied to a graduate 
who had taken his first degree of A.B. but had not yet taken his 
second degree of A.M., which was usually obtained three years after 
the first degree. 

(4) The system of "placing" students — that is, arranging their 
names not alphabetically but in accordance with the supposed social 

student was Bennet of 1659. In addition to these nine, there is mention 

as fellow-commoners of Thomas Langham and "Mr. Ven" in 1656, and of 
Edward Paige in 1683; but who those three were, or what their connection with 
the College was, has never been ascertained. For an explanation of the term 
fellow-commoner, see Mr. Lane's remarks in our Publications, xxiv. 165-166, 
174-175; Peirce, History, pp. 313-314. 

1 Henry Saltonstall of 1642 was a son, but not the eldest son, of a knight. 
The only eldest son of a knight known to have been a student at Harvard was 
William Mildmay (1647), who was not (as sometimes alleged) a son of Sir Henry- 
Mildmay of Graces, Little Baddow, Essex, England, but was the eldest son of 
Sir Henry Mildmay of Wanstead, Essex. These two Sir Henry Mildmays were 
second cousins, both great-grandsons of Sir Thomas Mildmay of Chelmsford, 
Essex. The Harvard graduate was a great-grandson of Sir Walter Mildmay, 
founder of Emmanuel College, Cambridge 

2 The title Dominus was soon abandoned, as it occurs only a few times in 
1644 (p. 4, below) and once in 1645 (p. 206, below). 

3 Under date of December 2, 1801, is an allusion to "Sir Ballard, a resident 
Graduate" (College Book, viii. 408). William Ballard graduated in 1799: cf. our 
Publications, viii. 295 note 1. 



IDENTIFICATIONS Cxli 

position of their fathers — was unknown at the English universities, 
and so originated at Harvard. Who introduced it, whether Nathaniel 
Eaton or Henry Dunster, has never been ascertained, nor are the 
reasons for its introduction known; but it was certainly established 
as early as 1642. It afforded the authorities an ingenious form of 
punishment, for, next to expulsion, "degradation" was the highest 
punishment. This was degrading a student to some place below the 
one to which he had been originally assigned. As the students ap- 
peared on all private and public occasions — at lectures, recitations, 
prayers, Commencement exercises, and in the meeting-house — and 
received their degrees, in the order in which they had been placed, 
"degradation" was not only a punishment to the student himself 
but was a blow at family pride. It may be added, that after either 
expulsion or degradation a student might be restored to the College 
or to his original place if he made a confession acceptable to 
the authorities, in which case the culprit stood in his place while 
the President read the confession to the assembled students in the 
College Hall. 1 Placing had nothing to do with scholarship, and " the 

1 The time when a class was placed varied considerably. Of the Class of 1729 
it is said: "Twenty and seven Scholars were admitted into the College this year. 
1725. They were plac'd or dispos'd in y e Classe by y e President and Fellows, as 
follows" (Faculty Records, i. 11), but no date is given. The Class of 1730 was 
placed between December 31, 1726, and March 25, 1727; that of 1731 between Sep- 
tember 11, 1727, and January 16, 1728; that of 1732 between September 30 and No- 
vember 26, 1728. The dates of placing the Classes of 1733-1754 were as follows: 



CLASS 


DATE OF PLACING 


CLASS 


DATE OP PLACING 


1733 


Oct. 


19 1729 


1744 


May 1 1741 


1734 


Sept. 


22 1730 


1745 


June 2 1742 


1735 


Oct. 


2 1731 


1746 


Jan. 17 1743 


1736 


Nov. 


4 1732 


1747 


March 15 1744 


1737 


Jan. 


9 1734 


1748 


Feb. 26 1745 


1738 


Dec. 


30 1734 


1749 


April 30 1746 


1739 


Feb. 


23 1736 


1750 


March 11 1747 


1740 


Feb. 


14 1737 


1751 


June 7 1748 


1741 


April 


29 1738 


1752 


May 16 1749 


1742 


Feb. 


21 1739 


1753 


March 18 1750 


1743 


Feb. 


12 1740 


1754 


March 16 1751 



As these records end on September 5, 1750, no class later than that of 1754 
need be specified. It may be added, however, that the Class of 1767 was not 
placed until July 12, 1764; and that the Class of 1772 was placed between June 7 
and 21, 1769. The system of placing was then abolished, and thereafter each 
Freshman Class was arranged in alphabetical order, the names being entered at 
entrance, or very soon after. Between entrance and placing, previous to 1773, 



Cxlii INTRODUCTION 

head" or "the first scholar" of a class might have been its greatest 
dullard. 

As already stated, when there were at College two students of the 
same surname, "Senior" and "Junior" were attached to their names. 
But "Sr." and "Jr." in themselves are not enough to identify the 
students, for the particular significance of those abbreviations has 
still to be determined. Given two students named Smith, did the 
designations "Sr." and "Jr." refer to age, or to the place in the class 
assigned to each? It was possible for three cases to arise. 

First, if the two Smiths were in different classes, Smith Sr. was the 
upper classman and Smith Jr. was the lower classman, regardless of 
the age of the two Smiths. 

Secondly, if the two Smiths were in the same class and were broth- 
ers, then the older was placed higher and the younger was placed 
lower; and hence necessarily Smith Sr. was the one placed higher or 
the older, and Smith Jr. was the one placed lower or the younger. 

Thirdly, what was the significance of Sr. and Jr. in those cases 
where the two Smiths were in the same class but were not brothers, 
and where the younger of the two was placed higher? There are 
two possible answers: on the one hand, Sr. might mean the student 
placed the higher of the two, regardless of their respective ages; on 
the other hand, Sr. might mean the older, regardless of their re- 
spective places in the class. It has been ascertained that in such 
cases Smith Sr. was the student placed higher, regardless of age. 1 

Attention should be called to one curious and remarkable instance 
of the disconcerting ramifications of the system of placing. Samuel 
Gardner of Salem, aged 16, and Joseph Gardner of Boston, aged 
14, were admitted in 1728 to the Class of 1732, the former being 
placed 11th and the latter 14th in the class. As Samuel Gardner was 
not only placed higher than Joseph Gardner but was older than 
Joseph Gardner, it follows that on any principle "Gardner Sr." must 
have been Samuel Gardner, and "Gardner Jr." must have been 
Joseph Gardner. Yet on April 21, 1731, the Corporation voted that 

Freshmen appear to have been arranged in alphabetical order (T. Pickering, 
in Life and Letters, i. 9). Why so long a time was allowed to elapse between 
entrance and placing, does not appear. 

1 For the evidence on which these conclusions are based, "see the Editor's 
"Note on 'Placing' at Harvard College," in our Publications, xxv. 420-427. 
See also Peirce, History, pp. 308-309, 310-311. 



IDENTIFICATIONS Cxliii 

" as to any allowance to Gardner Jun r of Salem, it be left to further 
consideration." * Why was Samuel Gardner called " Gardner Jun r ? " 
The explanation is to be found in the fact that on November 27, 
1728, Samuel Gardner was degraded five places. On June 5, 1731, 
Samuel Gardner was restored " to y e place in his Class from whence 
he had been degraded." 2 The extraordinary thing is this. When 
Samuel Gardner was degraded five places, he was brought three 
places below Joseph Gardner. Consequently, before November 27, 
1728, and after June 5, 1731, "Gardner Sr." was Samuel Gardner 
and "Gardner Jr." was Joseph Gardner; but between November 27, 
1728, and June 5, 1731, "Gardner Sr." was Joseph Gardner and 
" Gardner Jr." was Samuel Gardner. 

There are times when it would seem as if the College authorities 
themselves did not know exactly to whom they were referring. 
Great care has been taken to make a correct guess in the index as 
to the identity of a student who is mentioned in an equivocal way, 
but it cannot be hoped that mistakes have not been committed. 

Attention should be called to two matters that might prove puzzling 
to searchers for ancestors. First, a surname sometimes occurs in a 
form not easily recognized. The case of "Hobart" and "Hubbard" 
has already been referred to. 3 Other cases are "Maudsley" and 
"Moseley," 4 "Forbush" and "Forbes." 5 

Secondly, names were sometimes legally changed later in life. The 
name of Spencer Phips (1703) was originally Spencer Bennet; 6 that 

1 P. 592, below. It will perhaps be asked: "Why may not 'Gardner Jun r ' 
mean merely 'Gardner who is a member of the Junior Class'?" Because mem- 
bers of the Senior and Junior Classes were then called, not "Seniors" and 
"Juniors," but "Senior Sophisters" and "Junior Sophisters." 

2 Faculty Records, i. 22, 36. 

3 Pp. xli note 2, liii note 1, above. 

4 Samuel Moseley (1729) is entered in the Faculty Records (i. 11) as "Samuel 
Maudsley," and the name occurs in the same form on p. 548, below. 

5 Eli Forbes (1751) is entered in the Faculty Records (i. 268) as "Forbush 
Eli," and the name occurs in that form on pp. 798, 799, below, and in the 1751, 
1754, and 1758 Triennial Catalogues, and was apparently used by Mr. Forbes 
himself until in or about 1759. In the 1761 Triennial the name is "Eli Forbes." 

6 No copies of the Triennial Catalogues for 1703-1712 are extant, nor is there 
any allusion to Phips in these records while he was in College. The 1715 Triennial 
gives his name as "Spencer Phipps." On June 18,- 1716, "A Petition of Spencer 
Phips, alias Bennet Esq; Praying this Court to Declare and Confirm his Sir- 
Name to be Phips, having been Adopted by Sir William Phips Knt. Deceased, 
who desired that he might bear his Name," was passed in Council, and read in 



Cxliv INTRODUCTION 

of Dudley Atkins Tyng (1781) was originally Dudley Atkins; that 
of Thomas Russell Graves (1784) was originally Thomas Graves 
Russell; that of Dudley Story Bradstreet (1792) was originally Brad- 
street Story; that of John Dixwell (1796) was originally Samuel 
Hunt. 1 The case of Judge Edmund Trowbridge (1728) is a curious 
one. He was the son of Thomas and Mary (Goffe) Trowbridge, and, 
his father dying about 1725, he was placed under the guardianship of 
his uncle, Colonel Edmund Goffe (1690). From 1725 to the death 
of Colonel Goffe in 1740, Judge Trowbridge was frequently called 
Edmund Goffe, thus causing great confusion between him and his 
uncle, Colonel Goffe. There is no allusion to Judge Trowbridge as 
an undergraduate in these records, but while in College he was doubt- 
less known as Edmund Goffe, 2 and his name appears as "Edmundus 
Goffe" in the Triennial Catalogues of 1730, 1733, and 1736, but in 
that of 1745 it is given as "Edmundus Trowbridge." 3 

Finally, it should be stated that though the 1920 Quinquennial 
Catalogue has in general been followed in the index to these 
volumes in the spelling of surnames, in some cases that has been 
departed from. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries there 
was, of course, no uniformity in the matter of spelling, and it seems 
proper that the names of father and son, brothers, etc., where known, 
should appear under the same form. 4 



the House on the 19th; and a bill to that effect was passed on June 23: see our 
Publications, xvii. 93 note 3. It would appear that he had adopted the name 
Phips before the change was legalized. 

1 A word of caution should be uttered in regard to the 1885 Quinquennial, 
which, as it was the last to italicize the names of clergymen, is on that account 
often consulted by historical students. But besides containing various typo- 
graphical errors (cf. our Publications, xvii. 285 note), it fails to record legal 
changes in names. 

2 On January 23, 1734, President Wadsworth, "Having observed, y* y 6 Names 
of those Graduated in Harvard College, are not recorded in any of y e College- 
Books, I thought such an omission ought not to be continued" (p. 82, below), 
and so he copied the names from the 1733 Triennial. The name of "Edmund 
Goffe" was written by him under the Class of 1728, but later some one erased 
"Goffe" and wrote "Trowbridge" over it (p. 96 and note, below). 

8 No copies of the 1739 and 1742 Triennials are extant. 

4 Two examples will suffice by way of illustration. Joshua Moody (1653) and 
Samuel Moody (1689) were father and son, while Joseph Bourne (1722) and 
Shearjashub Bourne (1743) were brothers; yet in the 1920 Quinquennial the two 
former appear as Joshua Moodey and Samuel Moody, and the two latter as Joseph 
Bourn and Shear jashub Bourne. There are other similar cases in that edition. 



A1TENDANCE AT CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1674-1707 cxlv 

Attendance at Corporation Meetings, 1674-1707 

It is unfortunate that the very early records of the College are so 
meagre, and especially that for many years the names of those present 
at meetings were not entered, and for still further years were entered 
only sporadically. The first recorded meeting of the Overseers was 
that of December 27, 1643, but not until the meeting of December 5, 
1667, were the names of those present entered. The first recorded 
meeting of the Corporation was that of December 10, 1654, but 
not until the meeting of December 11, 1674, were the names of 
those present entered. So far as the Overseers are concerned, the 
matter of who were present is of little importance. But it is other- 
wise with the Corporation, and if it were known who were present 
at each meeting certain questions would not now puzzle the student 
of the history of the College. For instance, though there is no 
doubt who the Presidents (or Acting Presidents) and the Treasurers 
were from 1650 to 1690, there is great uncertainty as to who some of 
the Fellows were. The full number of Fellows was five, but some- 
times — exactly how often is the point in dispute — the number 
fell to the two or three who were also Tutors — that is, resident 
Fellows. From 1690 on it is known with certainty exactly who 
all the Fellows were. But the question who were present at meet- 
ings is still of importance, and hence the following lists have been 
compiled for the years 1674-1707. 

Four meetings during that period — those of December 5, 1667 
(p. 218, below), March 11, 1675 (p. 232, below), April 7, 1675 (p. 232, 
below), and August 9, 1681 (pp. 68, 242, below) — were joint 
meetings of the Overseers and of the Corporation, and the names 
of those present at the first three were duly entered. President 
Chauncy, Treasurer Danforth, and the three resident Fellows (or 
Tutors) Thomas Graves, Solomon Stoddard, and Alexander Nowell 
were present on December 5, 1667; Treasurer Richards and the two 
resident Fellows (or Tutors) Daniel Gookin and Peter Thacher 
were present on March 11 and April 7, 1675. Such names, however, 
are not included in the lists given below for the reason that they 
are not accurate guides as to the actual membership of the Corpo- 
ration, and we are left in doubt as to whether other members of 
the Corporation may not also have been present. For previous to 



Cxlvi INTRODUCTION 

1780, a man might have been both an Overseer and a Fellow of the 
Corporation; and, as a matter of fact, many men did hold both 
positions. Consequently at each of those meetings, certain Over- 
seers may also have been non-resident Fellows of the Corporation. 
It should be pointed out that though the name of Thomas Shepard 
is among those present at the meeting of March 1 (or 6 : see p. clxxii 
note 2, below), 1678 (p. 236, below), the entry must be an error, 
since he had died December 22, 1677. Attention should also be 
called to the fact that on several occasions (pp. 64, 65, 66, 67, 235, 
236, 238, 239, below) it is stated that all the members of the Corpo- 
ration were present, and yet either no names were entered or else 
fewer than seven names were entered — thus leaving doubt as to 
the exact make-up of the Corporation. At the meeting of March 
17, 1684 (pp. 75, 254), eight were entered as present. Of course, 
there were only seven members of the Corporation, but the eighth 
person was John Richards, who no doubt was asked to be present 
because he had been Treasurer from 1669 to 1682. (Cf. p. clvi 
note 4, below.) Finally, the meeting in the first list below, dated 
October 7, 1695, is in the original dated "Octob: 7. 92" (p. 352, 
below); but presumably "92" was a clerical error for "95." 

In addition to the meetings here listed, many others were held 
between 1674 and 1707 at which the names of those present were 
not entered: see pp. clxix-clxxv, below. The lists are divided into 
five sections: 

I. From December 11, 1674, to July 21, 1684. Twenty-one meetings. 
II. From June 2, 1690, to December 24, 1691, during the brief revival of the 
Corporation between the overthrow of Andros on April 18, 1689, and the Charter 
of 1692. Six meetings. 

III. From July 26, 1692, to November 9, 1696, under the Charter of 1692. 
Twenty-five meetings. 

IV. From July 13, 1697, to May 6, 1700, under the Charter of 1697. Thirteen 
meetings. 

V. From August 5, 1700, to October 28, 1707, under the Charter of 1700. 
Nineteen meetings. 



ATTENDANCE AT CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1674-1707 Cxlvii 



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1675 April 19 
1675 April 26 
1675 June 1 

1675 Dec. 27 

1676 Aug. 22 

1677 May 14 

1678 March 1 

1679 Oct. 8 
1681 July 12 
1681 Nov. 7 

1681 Dec. 13 

1682 Jan. 5 
1682 March 27 
1682 April 10 

1682 May 4 

1683 Jan. 10 
1683 March 22 

1683 Dec. 5 

1684 March 17 
1684 July 21 

Total 



Cxlviii INTRODUCTION 



§ § 3 O, 3 ® -g 

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Brattle, William xxxxxx 6 

Gookin, Nathaniel XX XXX 5 

Hobart, Nehemiah XX 2 

Leverett, John xxxxxx 6 

Mather, Cotton XX XXX 5 

Mather, Increase President 

Richards, John Treasurer xxxxxx 6 

Total 4 6 5 5 5 5 



ATTENDANCE AT CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1674-1707 cxlix 



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1692 Sept. 


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1693 March 


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1693 April 


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1693 April 


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1693 May 


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1693 June 


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1693 Aug. 


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1693 Sept. 


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1693 Oct. 


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1693 Nov. 


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1694 March 


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1694 June 


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1694 Aug. 


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1694 Sept. 


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1695 March 


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1695 April 


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1695 July 


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1695 Aug. 


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1695 Oct. 


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1696 Jan. 


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1696 April 


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1696 June 


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1696 July 


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Brattle, Thomas Treasurer . . . . x XX X X X X X X X 10 

Brattle, William X X X X X X X X X 9 

Danforth, John XXX X XXX.. .. X 8 

Dudley, Paul 

Hobart, Nehemiah X X . . X X . . X 5 

Leverett, John x x x x x x x x x x.... x 11 

Mather, Cotton X x x x x x x x x . . X X x 12 

Mather, Increase President ....XXXXXXXXXXXXX13 

Morton, Charles Vice President . . x 1 

Thacher, Peter XX.. XX X . . X . . 6 

Torrey, Samuel X . . . . X X . . XX.... 5 

Wadsworth, Benjamin x X x . . xxxxxxxxxl2 

Walter, Nehemiah x x x.. x x x x x x x x 11 

White, John x x x x x X . . x x x x x 11 

Wigglesworth, Michael X . . . . 1 

Willard, Samuel x x X X x X X x X X X X x 13 



Total 13 12 10 11 10 10 12 10 10 12 11 10 10 






ATTENDANCE AT CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1674-1707 



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1702 April 

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1703 March 23 



1703 Aug. 

1703 Sept. 

1704 May 
1704 Aug. 

1704 Sept. 

1705 Aug. 

1706 Aug. 

1707 March 27 
1707 Aug. 6 
1707 Oct. 28 

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cm 



INTRODUCTION 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF COLLEGE OFFICERS 

1637-1750 ! 









Presidents 






TOOK OFFICE 




LEFT 


OFFICE 


1037 






Nathaniel Eaton, Professor 2 


Sept. 


9 1639 


1640 


Aug. 


27 


Henry Dunster 


Oct. 


24 1654 


1654 


Nov. 


27 


Charles Chauncy 


*Feb. 


19 1672 


1672 


Dec. 


10 


Leonard Hoar 


March 15 1675 


1675 


April 


7 


Urian Oakes, Acting President 


Feb. 


9 1680 


1680 


Feb. 


9 


Urian Oakes 3 


*July 


25 1681 4 


1682 


April 


10 


John Rogers 


*July 


2 1684 


1685 


June 


11 


Increase Mather, Acting President July 


23 1686 


1686 


July 


23 


Increase Mather, Rector 5 


June 


27 1692 


1692 


June 


27 


Increase Mather 


Sept. 


6 1701 


1697 


June 


4 


Charles Morton, Vice President 


*April 


11 1698 


1700 


July 


12 


Samuel Willard, Vice President 


Aug. 


14 1707 


1708 


Jan. 


14 


John Leverett 


♦May 


3 1724 


1725 


July 


7 


Benjamin Wadsworth 


♦March 16 1737 


1737 


Sept. 


28 


Edward Holyoke 


*June 


1 1769 


1770 


March 21 


Samuel Locke 


Dec. 


1 1773 


1774 


Oct. 


14 


Samuel Langdon 


Aug. 


30 1780 


1781 


Dec. 


19 


Joseph Willard 


♦Sept. 


25 1804 



1 See Note, pp. clxi-clxiii, below. 

Dates in these lists are, unless otherwise specified, New Style. Though the 
Corporation Records here printed end with the meeting of September 5, 1750, 
the lists in a few cases have been extended through the year 1800. An asterisk 
denotes death while in office. 

2 Nathaniel Eaton was called "Professor," "Schoolmaster," "Master;" Presi- 
dent Wadsworth twice applied to him the title "President or Professor" (p. xix 
note 3, above); and by practically all writers since 1637 he has been regarded 
as the head of the College. 

3 The date in the Quinquennial is February 2, 1680. He was elected Feb- 
ruary 2 by the Corporation, but was not approved by the Overseers until 
February 9 (p. 239, below). 

4 The date of his death is sometimes given as July 24, 1681 : see our Publica- 
tions, xviii. 369 note 9. 

6 The Quinquennial Catalogue has been followed in giving June 27, 1692, as 
the date when the title "Rector" became extinct. It is certain, however, that 
that title could not have been used on and after June 2, 1690, and probably it 
was not employed after the overthrow of Andres on April 18, 1689. See pp. xxvi 
note 1 , xl note 2, above. 



LIST OF COLLEGE OFFICERS, 1637-1750 cliii 

Acting Presidents 1 

1654 The Fellows (Tutors) of the College 1654 

1681 The Fellows (Tutors) of the College 1682 

1736 Henry Flynt, assigned a portion of the duties 1737 

1769 The major part of the Tutors 1770 

1773 John Winthrop, assigned a portion of the duties 1774 

1780 Edward Wigglesworth 1781 



1 Appointed during vacancies, or during absence of the President, to per- 
form the duties of the office, excepting such as belong to the President as a mem- 
ber of the Corporation. 

President Oakes and President Mather attended meetings of the Corporation 
while serving as Acting Presidents, being in fact Presidents in all but the form of 
election, and their full term of service is recorded in the list of Presidents. No 
action in this respect is recorded during the vacancies occurring between the 
terms of Presidents Chauncy and Hoar (1672), and Vice President Willard^and 
President Leverett (1707-1708). 

The list in the 1920 Quinquennial (p. 8 note 2) of persons "Appointed to 
preside at Commencement during Vacancies in the President's Office" is both 
incomplete and inaccurate, for it gives only four years (1681, 1724, 1737, and 
1769), and the statement about 1737 is incorrect, since Nathan Prince did not 
preside in that year. (See pp. 662-663, below.) 

So far as is known, President Dunster presided at Commencement in the 
years 1642-1654, and President Chauncy in the years 1655-1671. There were 
vacancies in the presidency in 1672, 1681, 1724, 1769, 1774, and 1781. President 
Rogers was elected April 10, 1682, but was not inaugurated until August 12 or 
14, 1683 (cf. p. 253, below, and our Publications, xviii. 371 note 1), and did not 
preside in 1682. President Holyoke was elected May 30, 1737, but declined to 
preside at Commencement, and was not inaugurated until September 28. (See 
pp. 661, 662, 666, 823, below.) The following list, possibly incomplete, is taken 
from our Publications, xviii. 368-373: 

Persons other than Presidents and Vice Presidents 
appointed to preside at commencement, 1642-1800 



1672 


Urian Oakes 


1689 


William Brattle 


1675 


Urian Oakes 


1690 


John Leverett and William 


1676 


Urian Oakes 




Brattle 


1677 


Urian Oakes 


1691 


John Leverett and William 


1678 


Urian Oakes 




Brattle 


1679 


Urian Oakes 


1724 


Henry Flynt and Nicholas Sever 


1681 


Increase Mather 


1737 


Henry Flynt 


1682 


Increase Mather 


1769 


John Winthrop 


1684 


William Hubbard 


1781 


Edward Wigglesworth 


1688 


William Hubbard 


1798 


Simeon Howard 



For an account of the places where the Commencement exercises were held, 
and where the Commencement dinners were served, see our Publications, xviii. 
373-378. 



cliv 



INTRODUCTION 



Fellows 



CHRONOLOGICAL 

1650-1650 Samuel Mather 
1650-1654? Samuel Danforth 2 
1650-1668 Jonathan Mitchell 
1650-1650 Comfort Starr 
1650-1654 Samuel Eaton 
1650-1653 Urian Oakes 
1651-1653 John Collins 
1652-1654 Michael Wigglesworth 
1654-1655 Thomas Dudley 
1654-1673 Thomas Shepard 
1654-1656? Samuel Hooker 
1654-1657 Nehemiah Ambrose 
1656-1656? Samuel Nowell 
1656-1658 Joshua Moody 
1656-1657 Samuel Bradstreet 
1657-1663? Zechariah Symmes 

? 1657-1660? Zechariah Brigden? 

?1658-1661? Gershom Bulkley? 

?1660-1663? Samuel Shepard? 
1663-1664 Samuel Eliot 
1663-1666 Peter Bulkley 
1663-1666 Nathaniel Chauncy 

? 1664-1666? Joseph Whiting? 
1666-1671 Thomas Graves 



ALPHABETICAL 



James Allen 1 
Nehemiah Ambrose 
Samuel Andrew 
Samuel Angier 8 
Samuel Angier 
Nathaniel Appleton 
Samuel Bradstreet 
Thomas Brattle 
William Brattle 
William Brattle 
Zechariah Brigden? 
Joseph Browne 
Gershom Bulkley? 
Peter Bulkley 
Nathaniel Chauncy 
John Collins 
Benjamin Colman 
Ammi Ruhamah Corlet 4 
John Cotton 
John Danforth 
Samuel Danforth 5 
Samuel Danforth 6 
Samuel Danforth 6 
Paul Dudley 



1692-1707 

1654-1657 

1679-1684? 

1676-1678? 

1700-1707 

1717-1779 

1656-1657 

1703-1707 

?1685-1700 
1703-1717 

?1657-1660? 

?1671-1673 

?1658-1661? 
1663-1666 
1663-1666 
1651-1653 
1717-1728 
1676-1679 
1681-1690 
1697-1707 
1650-1654? 

?1668-1674 
1675-1675 
1697-1700 



1 The last meeting of the Corporation under the Charter of 1700 was held 
October 28, 1707; on December 4, 1707, the Council revived the Charter of 1650; 
and the first meeting of the Corporation under the restored Charter was held 
January 14, 1708, when Gov. Dudley reduced the Corporation from seventeen 
members to seven members. For a list of those who thus ceased to be Fellows, 
of whom Allen was one, see p. Ixi note 3, above. Perhaps such persons were 
still Fellows down to January 14, 1708, but their term of office is usually held to 
have ended on October 28, 1707. 

2 For footnotes, see the alphabetical list. 

3 The Quinquennial is followed in including Samuel Angier's name for the 
years 1676-1678? He was chosen a Probationer on August 22, 1676 (pp. 65, 
235, below), but there is no record of his approbation by the Overseers or of his 
receiving a salary, and the word "Socius" does not occur after his name in either 
the 16S1 or the 1700 Triennial (1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, 
viii. 23, 28) or in the 1698 Catalogue as printed in Mather's Magnalia (1702, bk. iv. 
p. 138). It seems likely, therefore, that Angier declined the appointment in 1676. 

4 His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1675-1679. He was 
elected Fellow December 22, 1675, but was not approved by the Overseers until 
January 1, 1676 (pp. 64, 234, 235, below). 

« H. C. 1643. « H. C. 1671. 



LIST OF COLLEGE OFFICERS, 1637-1750 



civ 



Fellows 



CHRONOLOGICAL 

1666-1667 Solomon Stoddard 

1666-1672 Alexander Nowell 

1668-1671? Joseph Pynchon 

? 1668-1674 Samuel Danforth 

? 1671-1673 Joseph Browne 

? 167 1-1673 John Richardson 

1672-1673 Urian Oakes 

1673-1681 Daniel Gookin 

1673-1674 Samuel Sewall 

1674-1676 Peter Thacher 

1675-1685 Increase Mather 

1675-1675 Urian Oakes 

1675-1677 Thomas Shepard 

1675-1675 Samuel Danforth 

1676-1679 Ammi Ruhamah Corlet 

1676-1678? Samuel Angier 

1678-1685 John Sherman 

1678-1681? Isaac Foster 

1679-1684? Samuel Andrew 

1681-1690 John Cotton 

1681-1692 Nehemiah Hobart 

1685-1685? Samuel Mitchell 

1685-1700 JohnLeverett 

71685-1700 William Brattle 

1690-1692 Nathaniel Gookin 

1690-1703 Cotton Mather 

1692-1707 James Allen 

1692-1700 Samuel Willard 

1692-1703 Nehemiah Walter 

1692-1697 Charles Morton 

1697-1705 Michael Wigglesworth 

1697-1707 Samuel Torrey 

1697-1712 Nehemiah Hobart 

1697-1707 Peter Thacher 

1697-1707 John Danforth 

1697-1700 Paul Dudley 

1697-1707 Benjamin Wadsworth 

1697-1707 John White 

1700-1707 Samuel Angier 

1700-1707 Henry Gibbs 

1700-1707 Jonathan Pierpont 

1700-1760 Henry Flynt 



ALPHABETICAL 

Thomas Dudley 1654-1655 

Samuel Eaton 1650-1654 

Samuel Eliot 1663-1664 

Jabez Fitch 1700-1703 

Henry Flynt 1700-1760 

Isaac Foster 1678-1681? 

Henry Gibbs 1700-1707 

Daniel Gookin 1673-1681 

Nathaniel Gookin 1690-1692 

Thomas Graves 1666-1671 

Nehemiah Hobart 1681-1692 

Nehemiah Hobart 1697-1712 

Edward Holyoke 1713-1716 

Samuel Hooker 1654-1656? 

John Leverett 1685-1700 

John Leverett 1707-1707 

Cotton Mather 1690-1703 

Increase Mather 1675-1685 

Samuel Mather 1650-1650 

Joseph Mayhew 1742-1755 

Jonathan Mitchell 1650-1668 

Samuel Mitchell 1685-1685? 

Joshua Moody 1656-1658 

Charles Morton 1692-1697 

Alexander Nowell 1666-1672 

Samuel Nowell 1656-1656? 

Urian Oakes 1650-1653 

Urian Oakes 1672-1673 

Urian Oakes 1675-1675 

Ebenezer Pemberton 1707-1717 

Jonathan Pierpont 1700-1707 

Nathan Prince 1728-1742 

Joseph Pynchon 1668-1671? 

Jonathan Remington 1 703-1 711 

John Richardson ?1671-1673 

Thomas Robie 1722-1723 

Nicholas Sever 1725-1728 

Joseph Sewall 1728-1765 

Samuel Sewall 1673-1674 

Samuel Shepard? ?1660-1663? 

Thomas Shepard 1654-1673 

Thomas Shepard 1675-1677 



cl 



VI 



INTRODUCTION 



Fellows 



CHRONOLOGICAL 


ALPHABETICAL 




1700-1703 


Jabez Fitch 


John Sherman l 


1678-1685 


1703-1711 


Jonathan Remington 


Comfort Starr 


1650-1650 


1703-1707 


Thomas Brattle 


Joseph Stevens 


1712-1713 


1703-1717 


William Brattle 


Joseph Stevens 


1716-1721 


1707-1707 


John Leverett 


Solomon Stoddard 


1666-1667 


1707-1717 


Ebenezer Pemberton 


Zechariah Symmes 


1657-1663? 


1711-1712 


John Whiting 


Peter Thacher 


1674-1676 


1712-1713 


Joseph Stevens 


Peter Thacher 


1697-1707 


1712-1725 


Benjamin Wadsworth 


Samuel Torrey 2 


1697-1707 


1713-1716 


Edward Holyoke 


Benjamin Wadsworth 


1697-1707 


1716-1721 


Joseph Stevens 


Benjamin Wadsworth 


1712-1725 


1717-1728 


Benjamin Colman 


Nehemiah W T alter 


1692-1703 


1717-1779 


Nathaniel Appleton 


John White 


1697-1707 


1722-1723 


Thomas Robie 


John Whiting 


1711-1712 


1724-1765 


Edward Wigglesworth. 


Joseph Whiting? 


?1664-1666? 


1725-1728 


Nicholas Sever 


Edward Wigglesworth 


1724-1765 


1728-1765 


Joseph Sewall 


Michael Wigglesworth 


1652-1654 


1728-1742 


Nathan Prince 


Michael Wigglesworth 


1697-1705 


1742-1755 


Joseph Mayhew 


Samuel Willard s 


1692-1700 




Treasurers 




1643-1650 


Herbert Pelham 


Thomas Brattle 


1693-1713 


1650-1668 


Thomas Danforth 


William Brattle 4 


1713-1715 


1669-1682 


John Richards 


Thomas Danforth 


1650-1668 


1683-1686 


Samuel Nowell 


John Hancock 


1773-1777 


1686-1693 


John Richards 


Thomas Hubbard 


1752-1773 


1693-1713 


Thomas Brattle 


Edward Hutchinson 


1721-1752 


1713-1715 


William Brattle 


Samuel Nowell 5 


1683-1686 






1 Rev. John Sherman (d 1685) of Watertown. 

2 His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1697-1705. The last 
meeting he attended was that of August 29, 1704 (p. cli, above); but he con- 
tinued to be a Fellow until his death on April 21, 1707 (Sewall, Diary, ii. 185). 

8 His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1692-1699. He attended 
as a Fellow the meeting of May 6, 1700 (p. cl, above), and did not become 
Vice President until July 12, 1700. 

* See the next note. 

5 Nowell's term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1682-16S6. On 
April 10, 1682, Treasurer Richards was desired to leave his account of the College 
stock in the hands of Thomas Danforth until "his return from England or until! 
another Treasurer be chosen" (pp. 71, 245, below). Nowell was elected Treasurer 
on January 10, 1683, "still reserving Liberty for the worshipfull Cap* Richards 
to reassumc the place at his return" (pp. 72, 248, below). On March 5, 1683, 
Danforth "delivered into the hands of" Nowell the accounts betrusted to him 
by Richards (pp. 250-251, below). On March 29, 1683, the Corporation issued 



LIST OF COLLEGE OFFICERS, 1637-1750 civil 

Treasurers 

CHRONOLOGICAL ALPHABETICAL 

1715-1721 John White Herbert Pelharn 1643-1650 

1721-1752 Edward Hutchinson John Richards 1669-1682 

1752-1773 Thomas Hubbard John Richards 1686-1693 

1773-1777 John Hancock Ebenezer Storer 1777-1807 

1777-1807 Ebenezer Storer John White 1 1715-1721 

Professors 

Theology 

1722-1765 Edward Wigglesworth, 2 Hollis 

Mathematics 
1728-1738 Isaac Greenwood, 3 Hollis 
1738-1779 John Winthrop, Hollis 



instructions to Nowell (4 Massachusetts Historical Collections, viii. 694). On 
October 22, 1686, Richards wrote: "I took Care again of the Colledge Stockep 
pswation of m r Dudley m r Stoughton & m r Increase Mather & rec d of m r Sam 1 
Nowell the late Treasurer the Severall Papers vnderneath written" (Treasurer 
Richards's Book. Cf. 1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society, vi. 248; 
Sibley, Harvard Graduates, i. 340; Quincy, History, ii. 231-233) . It is to be noted* 
however, that both Richards and Nowell were present at the meeting of March 17, 
1684 (thus making eight present at that meeting), and that at the meeting of July 
21, 1684, Richards is called Treasurer (p. cxlvii, above, pp. 254, 256, below). 

1 The Quinquennial is followed in giving his term of service as 1715-1721. 
Treasurer Thomas Brattle died May 18, 1713 (Leverett's Diary, p. 76). John 
White was elected Treasurer by the Corporation on October 27, 1713, and was 
approved by the Overseers on October 7, 1714 (pp. 420, 425, below). As executor 
of his brother Thomas's will, William Brattle had "paid out sundry Sums of 
Money belonging to the College Treasury;" and on October 27, 1713, the Cor- 
poration "fully approved and allowed" what Brattle "hath don in these matters," 
and further voted that William Brattle "do continue and is hereby impowered 
to act as Treasurer of the College, and that the Treasurer's Salary be continued 
to him untill he shalbe discharged from this Trust and trouble" (pp. 420-421, 
below). On August 16, 1715, the Corporation voted that "M r John White 
having comply'd with the Vote of the Corporation pass'd Octob 1 " 27° 1713. is 
impowered and directed to take the College-Stock, and all things thereunto be- 
longing into his Custody and care, and the Rev d M r Brattle is desired to deliver 
the s d Stock and all matters and things belonging to the Treasury of Harvard 
College to the s d M r John White the Treasurer of the s d College;" and on October 
18, 1715, " M r Brattle deliver'd to the Corporation an inventory of the College- 
Stock, with M r Treasurer White's rec* of the s d Stock" (pp. 427, 431, below). 

2 His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1721-1765. He was elected 
Professor by the Corporation June 28, 1721, but was not approved by the Overseers ; 
he was again elected by the Corporation January 23, 1722; was approved by the 
Overseers January 24, 1722; and was installed October 23, 1722 (pp. 460-461, 463, 
475, below; Leverett's Diary, pp. 199, 213, 215, 234; Overseers' Records, i. 23). 

3 His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1727-1737. He was 
thought of as Professor as early as 1726; was elected by the Corporation May 



clviii 



INTRODUCTION 



Tutors 



1650-1654 
1650-1653 
1651-1653 
1652-1654 



1654-1657 
1656-1656? 
1656-1658 
1656-1657 



CHRONOLOGICAL 

1643-1646? George Downing 
1643-1646? John Bulkley 
?1644-1649? Samuel Danforth 
?1646-1649? Samuel Mather 
? 1646-1650? Jonathan Mitchell 
? 1649-1650 Comfort Starr 
Samuel Eaton 
Urian Oakes 
John Collins 
Michael Wigglesworth 
1654-1655? Thomas Dudley 
1654-1656? Thomas Shepard 
1654-1656? Samuel Hooker 

Nehemiah Ambrose 
Samuel Nowell 
Joshua Moody 
Samuel Bradstreet 
1657-1663? Zechariah Symmes 
? 1657-1660? Zechariah Brigden? 
?1658-1661? Gershom Bulkley? 
?1660-1663? Samuel Shepard? 
1663-1664 Samuel Eliot 
1663-1666 Peter Bulkley 
1663-1666 Nathaniel Chauncy 
? 1664-1666? Joseph Whiting? 
1666-1671 Thomas Graves 
1666-1667 Solomon Stoddard 
1666-1672 Alexander Nowell 
1668-1671? Joseph Pynchon 
? 1671-1 673 Joseph Browne 
?1671-1673 John Richardson 
1673-1681 Daniel Gookin 
1673-1674 Samuel Sewall 
1674-1676 Peter Thacher 
1675-1675 Samuel Danforth 
1676-1679 Ammi Ruhamah Corlet 



ALPHABETICAL 

Nehemiah Ambrose 1654-1657 

Samuel Andrew 1679-1684? 

Samuel Angier 1 1676-1678? 

Samuel Bradstreet 1656-1657 

William Brattle ?1685-1697 

Zechariah Brigden? ?1657-1660? 

Joseph Browne ?1671-1673 

Gershom Bulkley? ?1658-1661? 

John Bulkley 1643-1646? 

Peter Bulkley 1663-1666 

Nathaniel Chauncy 1663-1666 

John Collins 1651-1653 
Ammi Ruhamah Corlet 2 1676-1679 

John Cotton 1681-1685 

Samuel Danforth 3 ?1644-1649? 

Samuel Danforth 4 1675-1675 

John Davenport 1728-1732 

George Downing 1643-1646? 

Thomas Dudley 1654-1655? 

Samuel Eaton 1650-1654 

Samuel Eliot 1663-1664 

Jabez Fitch 1697-1703 

Henry Flynt 1699-1754 

Isaac Foster 1678-1681? 

Daniel Gookin 1673-1681 

Thomas Graves 1666-1671 

Belcher Hancock 1742-1767 

Edward Holyoke 1712-1716 

Samuel Hooker 1654-1656? 

John Leverett 1685-1697 

Thomas Marsh 1741-1766 

Samuel Mather ?1646-1649? 

Joseph Mayhew 1739-1755 

Jonathan Mitchell ?1646-1650? 

Samuel Mitchell 1684-1685 

Joshua Moody 1656-165S 



12, 1727; was confirmed by the Overseers May 25, 1727; and was installed 
February 13, 1728 (pp. 535, 545, 559, below; Overseers' Records, i. 93, 105; 
Wadsworth's Diary, p. 51; New England Weekly Journal, February 26, 1728, 
p. 2/2). 

1 See p. cliv note 3, above. * See p. cliv note 4, above. 

8 H. C. 1643. 4 H. C. 1671. 



LIST OF COLLEGE OFFICERS, 1637-1750 



clix 



CHRONOLOGICAL 

1676-1678? Samuel Angier 

1678-1681? Isaac Foster 

1679-1684? Samuel Andrew 

1681-1685 John Cotton 

1684-1685 Samuel Mitchell 

1685-1697 John Leverett 

?1685-1697 William Brattle 

1697-1700 Ebenezer Pemberton 

1697-1703 Jabez Fitch 

1699-1754 Henry Flynt 

1700-1702 Nathaniel Saltonstall 

1 703-1 711 Jonathan Remington 

1703-1706 Josiah Willard 

1706-1712 John Whiting 

1712-1713 Joseph Stevens 

1712-1716 Edward Holyoke 

1714-1723 Thomas Robie 

1716-1728 Nicholas Sever 

1720-1728 William Welsteed 

1723-1742 Nathan Prince 

1728-1732 John Davenport 

1728-1739 Stephen Sewall 

1732-1741 Daniel Rogers 

1739-1755 Joseph Mayhew 

1741-1766 Thomas Marsh 

1742-1767 Belcher Hancock 



Tutors 

ALPHABETICAL 

Alexander Nowell 1666-1672 

Samuel Nowell 1656-1656? 

Urian Oakes 1650-1653 

Ebenezer Pemberton 1697-1700 

Nathan Prince 1723-1742 

Joseph Pynchon 1668-1671? 

Jonathan Remington 1703-1711 

John Richardson ?1671-1673 

Thomas Robie 1714-1723 

Daniel Rogers 1 1732-1741 

Nathaniel Saltonstall 1700-1702 

Nicholas Sever 1716-1728 

Samuel Sewall 1673-1674 

Stephen Sewall 1728-1739 

Samuel Shepard? ?1660-1663? 

Thomas Shepard 1654-1656? 

Comfort Starr ?1649-1650 

Joseph Stevens 2 1712-1713 

Solomon Stoddard 1666-1667 

Zechariah Symmes 1657-1663? 

Peter Thacher 1674-1676 

William Welsteed 1720-1728 

John Whiting 1706-1712 

Joseph Whiting? ?1664-1666? 

Michael Wigglesworth 1652-1654 

Josiah Willard 1703-1706 



Instructors 
1722-1760 Judah Monis, Hebrew 
1733-1735 Louis Langloiserie, 3 French 



1 There were two of the name in the Class of 1725, the Tutor being the one 
who died in 1785. 

2 His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1711-1714. He was 
elected Tutor by the Corporation December 24, 1711; was approved by the 
Overseers January 17, 1712; and was installed February 14, 1712 (p. 399, 
below). He had left College before April 7, 1713, on which day the vacancy 
was filled by the election of Edward Holyoke as Fellow and of Thomas Robie 
as Tutor (p. 407, below). 

3 Not an Instructor regularly appointed, but permitted in 1733 (not by the 
Corporation, as stated in the Quinquennial, but) by the President and Tutors — 
that is, the Faculty — to teach such students as so desired. The permission was 
withdrawn in 1735. See the Editor's "Teaching of French at Harvard College 
before 1750," in our Publications, xvii. 216-232. 



clx 



INTRODUCTION 



CHRONOLOGICAL 

1667-1672 Solomon Stoddard 

1674-1674 Samuel Sewall 

1674-1676 Daniel Gookin 

1676-1679 Daniel Allin 

1679-1681 Daniel Gookin 

1681-1690 John Cotton 

1690-1693 Henry Newman 

1693-1697 Ebenezer Pemberton 

1697-1701 Nathaniel Saltonstall 

1701-1701 Anthony Stoddard 

1701-1703 Josiah Willard 

1703-1706 John Whiting 

1706-1707 John Gore 

1707-1709 Nathaniel Gookin 

1709-1712 Edward Holyoke 

1712-1713 Thomas Robie 

1713-1714 John Denison 

1714-1718 John Rogers 

1718-1720 William Welsteed 

1720-1721 William Cooke 

1721-1722 Joshua Gee 

1722-1723 Mitchel Sewall 

1723-1726 John Hancock 

1726-1728 Stephen Sewall 

1728-1729 Joseph Champney 

1729-1730 Joseph Pynchon 

1730-1734 Henry Gibbs 

1734-1735 Samuel Coolidge 

1735-1737 James Diman 

1737-1737 Samuel Cooke 

1737-1741 Thomas Marsh 

1741-1742 Belcher Hancock 

1X12-1743 Benjamin Prat 

1743-1748 Matthew Cushing 

1748-1750 Oliver Peabody 



Librarians 

alphabetical 

Daniel Allin 1676-1679 

Joseph Champney 1728-1729 

Samuel Cooke 1 1737-1737 

William Cooke 1720-1721 

Samuel Coolidge 1734-1735 

John Cotton 1681-1690 

Matthew Cushing 1743-1748 

John Denison 1713-1714 

James Diman 1735-1737 

Joshua Gee 1721-1722 

Henry Gibbs 1730-1734 

Daniel Gookin 1674-1676 

Daniel Gookin 1679-1681 

Nathaniel Gookin 1707-1709 

John Gore 1706-1707 

Belcher Hancock 1741-1742 

John Hancock 1723-1726 

Edward Holyoke 1709-1712 

Thomas Marsh 1737-1741 

Henry Newman 1690-1693 

Oliver Peabody 1748-1750 

Ebenezer Pemberton 1693-1697 

Benjamin Prat 1742-1743 

Joseph Pynchon 1729-1730 

Thomas Robie 1712-1713 

John Rogers 1714-1718 

Nathaniel Saltonstall 1697-1701 

Mitchel Sewall 1722-1723 

Samuel Sewall 1674-1674 

Stephen Sewall 1726-1728 

Anthony Stoddard 2 1701-1701 

Solomon Stoddard 1667-1672 

William Welsteed 1718-1720 

John Whiting 1703-1706 

Josiah Willard 3 1701-1703 



1 The name of Samuel Cooke as Librarian is not given in any Triennial or 
Quinquennial, nor is the fact entered against his name under the Class of 1735. 

2 There were two of the name in the Class of 1697, the Librarian being the one 
who died in 1748. His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1701- 
1702. On April 7, 1701, he was "Appointed Library-Keeper until the Comin- 
cem*," and on August 4, 1701, Josiah Willard was "appointed Library keeper 
for this year" (p. 366, below). 

3 His term of service is given in the Quinquennial as 1702-1703. He was ap- 
pointed Librarian August 4, 1701 (p. 366, below). 



LIST OF COLLEGE OFFICERS, 1637-1750 



clxi 







Stewards 




CHRONOLOGICAL 


ALPHABETICAL 




-1649 


Matthew Day 


Aaron Bordman 


1687-1703 


1649-1660 


Thomas Chesholme 


Andrew Bordman 1 


1682-1687 


1660- 


John Sherman 


Andrew Bordman 2 


1703-1747 


-1668 


William Bordman 


Andrew Bordman 8 


1747-1750 


1668-1682 


Thomas Danforth 


William Bordman 


-1668 


1682-1687 


Andrew Bordman 


Thomas Chesholme 


1649-1660 


1687-1703 


Aaron Bordman 


Thomas Danforth 


1668-1682 


1703-1747 


Andrew Bordman 


Matthew Day 


-1649 


1747-1750 


Andrew Bordman 


Caleb Gannett 


1779-1818 


1750-1779 


Jonathan Hastings 


Jonathan Hastings 


1750-1779 


1779-1818 


Caleb Gannett 


John Sherman 4 


1660- 



NOTE 

The Triennial Catalogues from 1674 (the earliest known) to 1773 were printed 
as broadsides and each contained a list of those only on whom degrees had been 
conferred by Harvard College. The 1776 Triennial was printed in octavo form, 
with title-page; but the 1776-1788 Triennials still contained only a list of those 
on whom degrees had been conferred by the College. In the 1791 Triennial were 
printed, for the first time, a list of "Praesides Universitatis ab anno 1640 ad 
annum 1791," and, also for the first time, the names of the Corporation ("Senatus 
Academicus") for the year 1791, of the Professors for the year 1791, and of the 
Tutors for the year 1791. In the 1794 Triennial, the name of the then Librarian 
was added; and similar lists were printed in the 1797-1803 Triennials. Certain 
features appeared for the first time, or certain changes were made, in the years 
indicated as follows: 

1806 Lists of Fellows (from 1707), of Treasurers (from 1640), of Professors 
(from 1721), of Tutors (from 1707), and of Librarians (from 1766) first 
appeared. To the list of "Socii" was appended this footnote: "Sociorum 
Tutorumque Catalogum in editione proxime sequente perfectiorem fore 
speratur." 
1818 List of Overseers (from 1310) and of Instructors (from 1812) first 

appeared. 
1833 The date of Thomas Danforth's term as Treasurer was corrected 
from 1640-1668 (as it had been printed since 1806) to 1650-1668; and 
the list of Tutors was carried back to 1699. 
1839 The list of Librarians was carried back to 1674. 
1842 The name of Herbert Pelham as Treasurer from 1643 to 1650 first 
appeared; and the list of Librarians was carried back to 1667. 



1 Died 1687. 

2 Died 1747. 

8 H. C. 1719; died 1769. 

4 This John Sherman (d 1691), of Watertown, was a first cousin of the Rev. 
John Sherman (d 1685) : see New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 
xxiv. 63-67. 



Clxii INTRODUCTION 

1851 List of Stewards first appeared. 

1863 The list of Overseers was followed by "Inspectorum Secretarii" 

(from 1712). 
1872 The list of Instructors was carried back to 1722. 

The Triennial Catalogues ended with the issue of 1875, and the lists in the 
Quinquennial Catalogue of 1880 were the same as they had been in the 1872 
and 1875 Triennials. For other information about the Triennial Catalogues, 
see Sibley's article in 1 Proceedings Massachusetts Historical Society (1864), 
viii. 9-56. 

On January 12, 1885, the late William H. Tillinghast was appointed Editor 
of the Quinquennial Catalogue. At a meeting of the Corporation on April 27, 
President Eliot — 

"presented the following resolution passed by the Board of Overseers at their 
meeting of April 15, 1885, — ' that an examination be made of the Records of 
the Corporation, and that the names of all Fellows, Overseers, and other officers 
of instruction or government who have been regularly appointed and confirmed, 
be inserted in the next edition of the Quinquennial Catalogue.' 

"Voted to cause such action to be taken by the editor of the Quinquennial 
Catalogue as is hereby recommended by the Board of Overseers." 

The results of Mr. Tillinghast's examination were entered in a bound book 
of over six hundred pages which he gave to the College August 20, 1885. It is 
labelled UA III. 1. 20. The manuscript title-page reads: 

The Overseers, Fellows, Tutors 
and Instructors 

of 

Harvard College 

who were not recorded in the 

General Catalogue 

prior to 1885. 



Compiled by 
William H. Tillinghast 

1885 

Hence in the 1885 Quinquennial appeared, for the first time, a complete 
chronological list of College officers, the Fellows being carried back to 1650 and 
the Tutors to 1643. Similar lists appeared in the 1890-1910 Quinquennials. In 
the 1915 Quinquennial only a partial chronological list was printed, followed by 
an "Alphabetical List of Officers of Government and Instruction;" and a similar 
arrangement was adopted in the 1920 Quinquennial. The partial chronological 
list contained only the names of the Presidents, Acting Presidents, Fellows, 
Treasurers, Overseers, Professors, and (from 1905) Visiting Professors and 
Lecturers from Foreign Universities. The omission of a chronological list of 
Tutors, Instructors, Librarians, and Stewards renders the 1915 and 1920 Quin- 
quennials less useful to the student of the history of the College than those of 
1885-1910. 



LIST OF COLLEGE OFFICERS, 1637-1750 clxiii 

The chronological list of College officers here printed (pp. clii-clxi) is of course 
based on the lists that have appeared in the 1791-1875 Triennials and the 1880- 
1920 Quinquennials, but with certain corrections (duly noted) made necessary 
by the records now printed or by data obtained from other sources. So far as 
the Fellows and the Tutors are concerned, no absolutely correct list can be com- 
piled, owing partly to the fact that the early records are imperfect and partly 
to the confusion that existed for many years as to the exact meaning of the word 
"Fellow," in regard to which see pp. cxxxii-cxxxv, above. 



clxiv INTRODUCTION 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF MASSACHUSETTS 

OFFICIALS 

1636-1775 * 









Governors 






TOOK OFFICE 




LEFT OFFICE 


1636 


May 


25 


Henry Vane 


1637 




1637 


May 


17 


John Winthrop 


1640 




1640 


May 


13 


Thomas Dudley 


1641 




1641 


June 


2 


Richard Bellingham 


1642 




1642 


May 


18 


John Winthrop 


1644 




1644 


May 


29 


John Endecott 


1645 




1645 


May 


14 


Thomas Dudley 


1646 




1646 


May 


6 


John Winthrop 


1649 




1649 


May 


2 


John Endecott 


1650 




1650 


May 


22 


Thomas Dudley 


1651 




1651 


May 


7 


John Endecott 


1654 




1654 


May 


3 


Richard Bellingham 


1655 




1655 


May 


23 


John Endecott 


1665 




1665 


May 


3 


Richard Bellingham 


1672 




1673 


May 


7 


John Leverett 


1679 




1679 


May 


28 


Simon Bradstreet 


1686 




1686 


May 


25 


Joseph Dudley 2 


1886 


Dec. 20 


1686 


Dec. 


20 


Sir Edmund Andros 


1689 3 




1689 


June 


7 


Simon Bradstreet 


1692 


May 


1692 


May 


16 


Sir William Phips 


1694 


Nov. 17 



1 This list is given because the officials are often alluded to merely by their 
titles, — as "the country Treasurer," "the Secretary," "His Excellency the 
Governor," "His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor," etc. Though the names 
have, for convenience, been brought together in a single list, strictly speaking 
there have been five periods, as follows: 

I Colony of the Massachusetts Bay, 1636-1686; 
II Council for New England, 1686; 

III Territory and Dominion of New England, 1686-1689; 

IV Period from April 18, 1689, to May, 1692; 

V Province of the Massachusetts Bay, 1692-1775. 

2 In 1686 Joseph Dudley's title was President of the Council for New England. 
8 Andros's government was overthrown April 18, 1689. 



LIST OF MASSACHUSETTS OFFICIALS, 1636-1775 



clxv 









Governors 








TOOK OFFICE 




LEFT OFFICE 


1699 


May 


26 


Earl of Bellomont 


1700 


July 


17 


1702 


June 


11 


Joseph Dudley 


1715 


Nov. 


9 1 


1716 


Oct. 


5 


Samuel Shute 


1723 


Jan. 


1 


1728 


July 


19 


William Burnet 


1729 


Sept. 


7 


1730 


Aug. 


10 


Jonathan Belcher 


1741 


Aug. 


14 


1741 


Aug. 


14 


William Shirley 


1756 


Sept. 


25 


1757 


Aug. 


3 


Thomas Pownall 


1760 


June 


3 


1760 


Aug. 


2 


Sir Francis Bernard 


1769 


Aug. 


1 


1771 


March 14 


Thomas Hutchinson 


1774 


May 


17 


1774 


May 


17 


Thomas Gage 












Deputy- or Lieutenant-Governors 2 






1636 


May 


25 


John Winthrop 


1637 






1637 


May 


17 


Thomas Dudley 


1640 






1640 


May 


13 


Richard Bellingham 


1641 






1641 


June 


2 


John Endecott 


1644 






1644 


May 


29 


John Winthrop 


1646 






1646 


May 


6 


Thomas Dudley 


1650 






1650 


May 


22 


John Endecott 


1651 






1651 


May 


7 


Thomas Dudley 


1653 






1653 


May 


18 


Richard Bellingham 


1654 






1654 


May 


3 


John Endecott 


1655 






1655 


May 


23 


Richard Bellingham 


1665 






1665 


May 


3 


Francis Willoughby 


1671 






1671 


May 


31 


John Leverett 


1673 






1673 


May 


7 


Samuel Symonds 


1678 






1679 


May 


28 


Thomas Danforth 


1686 






1686 


May 


26 


William Stoughton 3 


1686 


Dec. 


20 


1688 


July 


19 


Francis Nicholson 








1689 


June 


7 


Thomas Danforth 


1692 


May 




1692 


May 


16 


William Stoughton 


1701 


July 


7 


1702 


June 


11 


Thomas Povey 


1706 


Jan. 


28 


1711 


Oct. 


4 


William Tailer 


1716 


Oct. 


5 


1716 


Oct. 


5 


William Dummer 


1730 


June 


11 


1730 


June 


11 


William Tailer 


1732 


March 1 



1 In 1715 Elizeus Burges was commissioned Governor, but never came over. 
See our Publications, xiv. 360-372, xvii. 60-61. 

2 The title "Deputy-Governor" was employed in 1636-1686 and 1689-1692; 
the title "Lieutenant-Governor" was employed in 1688-1689 and 1692-1775. 

3 In 1686 William Stoughton's title was Deputy-President. 



C1XV1 






INTRODUCTION 

Lieutenant-Governors 






TOOK OFFICE 




LEFT OFFICE 


1732 


Aug. 


8 


Spencer Phips 


1757 


April 4 


1758 


June 


1 


Thomas Hutchinson 


1771 


March 14 


1771 


March 14 


Andrew Oliver 


1774 


March 3 


1774 


Aug. 


8 


Thomas Oliver 

Secretaries 






1634 


May 


14 


Simon Bradstreet 


1636 l 




1636 ] 






Increase Nowell 


1650 




1650 


May 


22 


Edward Rawson 


1686 




1686 


July 


1 


Edward Randolph 






1689 


June 


7 


Isaac Addington 


1692 


May 


1692 


May 


16 


Isaac Addington 


1715 


March 19 


1715 


Sept. 


24 


Samuel Woodward 


1716 


Aug. 3 


1717 


Dec. 


4 


Josiah Willard 


1756 


Dec. 7 


1756 


Dec. 


15 


Andrew Oliver 


1771 


March 11 


1771 


March 11 


Thomas Flucker 












Treasurers 






1636 


May 


25 


Richard Dummer 


1637 




1637 


May 


17 


Richard Bellingham 


1640 




1640 


May 


13 


William Tyng 


1644 




1644 


Nov. 


13 


Richard Russell 


1676 




1676 


May 


3 


John Hull 


1680 




1680 


May 


19 


James Russell 


1685 




1685 


Oct. 


21 


Samuel Nowell 


1686 




1686 


July 


1 


John Usher 






1689 


June 


11 


John Phillips 


1693 




1693 


June 


17 


James Taylor 


1714 




1714 


June 


25 


Jeremiah Allen 


1736 




1736 


July 


5 


William Foye 


1753 




1753 


June 


22 


Harrison Gray 







1 The records from August 23, 1630, to May 25, 1636, both included, are in 
the hand of Simon Bradstreet; those beginning June 7, 1636, are in the hand of 
Increase Nowell (Massachusetts Colony Records, i. 73, 176). But though Nowell 
was apparently Acting Secretary from June 7, 1636, and though his name ap- 
pears as "Increase Nowell Sec:" as early as December 6, 1636 (i. 184), yet his 
election is not recorded until June 6, 1639 (i. 263). 






LIST OF COMMENCEMENT DAYS, 1642-1750 



clxvii 



LIST OF COMMENCEMENT DAYS 

1642-1750 l 







DAY OF 


DAY OF 






DAY OF 


DAY OF 


YEAB 


MONTH 


MONTH 


WEEK 


YEAR 


MONTH 


MONTH 


WEEK 


1642 2 








1673 


Aug. 


12 


Tu 


1643 


Oct.' 






1674 


Aug. 


11 


Tu 


1644 * 








1675 


Aug. 


10 


Tu 


1645 5 








1676 


Aug. 


8 


Tu 


1646 


July 


28 


Tu 


1677 


Aug. 


14 


Tu 


1647 


July 


27 


Tu 


1678 


Aug. 


13 


Tu 


1648 


July 


25* 


Tu 


1679 


Aug. 


12 


Tu 


1649 


July 


31 


Tu 


1680 


Aug. 


10 


Tu 


1650 


July 


30 


Tu 


1681 


Aug. 


9 


Tu 


1651 


Aug. 


12 


Tu 


1682 


Aug. 


8 


Tu 


1652 


Aug. 


10 


Tu 


1683 


Sept. 


12 


W 


1653 


Aug. 


9 


Tu 


1684 


July 


1 


Tu 


1653 


Aug. 


10 


W 


1685 


July 


1 


W 


1654 


Aug. 


8 


Tu 


1686 


July 


7 


W 


1655 


Aug. 


14 


Tu 


1687 


July 


6 


W 


1656 


Aug. 


12 


Tu 


1688 


July 


4 


W 


1657 


Aug. 


11 


Tu 


1689 


Sept. 


11 


W 


1658 


Aug. 


10 


Tu 


1690 


July 


2 


W 


1659 


Aug. 


9 


Tu 


1691 


July 


1 


W 


1660 


Aug. 


14 


Tu 


1692 


July 


6 


W 


1661 


Aug. 


13 


Tu 


1693 


July 


5 


W 


1662 


Aug. 


12 


Tu 


1694 


July 


4 


W 


1663 


Aug. 


11 


Tu 


1695 


July 


3 


W 


1664 


Aug. 


9 


Tu 


1696 


July 


1 


W 


1665 


Aug. 


8 


Tu 


1697 


July 


7 


W 


1666 


Aug. 


14 


Tu 


1698 


July 


6 


W 


1667 


Aug. 


13 


Tu 


1699 


July 


5 


W 


1668 


Aug. 


11 


Tu 


1700 


July 


3 


W 


1669 


Aug. 


10 


Tu 


1701 


July 


2 


W 


1670 


Aug. 


9 


Tu 


1702 


July 


1 


W 


1671 


Aug. 


8 


Tu 


1703 


July 


7 


W 


1672 


Aug. 


13 


Tu 


1704 


July 


5 


W 



1 See the Editor's "Harvard Commencement Days, 1642-1916," in our Pub- 
lications, xviii. 309-384. 

2 Day not known, but before September 26. 

3 Day of month unknown. 

4 No Commencement. 
6 Date unknown. 

G Dates printed in italics are conjectural. 



clxvni 






INTRODUCTION 












DAT OF 


DAT OF 






DAT OF 


DAT OF 


TEAB 


MONTH 


MONTH 


WEEK 


TEAB 


MONTH 


MONTH 


week: 


1705 


July 


4 


W 


1728 


June 


28 


F 


1706 


July 


3 


W 


1729 


June 


27 


F 


1707 


July 


2 


W 


1730 


June 


24 


W 


1708 


July 


7 


W 


7731 


June 


25 


F 


1709 


July 


6 


W 


1732 


June 


23 


F 


1710 


July 


5 


W 


1733 


June 


29 


F 


1711 


July 


4 


w 


1734 


July 


5 


F 


1712 


July 


2 


w 


1735 


July 


4 


F 


1713 


July 


1 


w 


1736 


July 


7 


W 


1714 


July 


7 


w 


1737 


July 


6 


W 


1715 


Aug. 


31 


w 


1738 


July 


5 


W 


1716 


July 


4 


w 


1739 


July 


4 


W 


1717 


July 


3 


w 


1740 


Aug. 


27 


W 


1718 


July 


2 


w 


1741 


July 


1 


W 


1719 


July 


1 


w 


1742 


July 


7 


W 


1720 


July 


6 


w 


1743 


July 


6 


W 


1721 


June 


28 


w 


1744 


July 


4 


W 


1722 


July 


4 


w 


1745 


July 


3 


W 


1723 


July 


3 


w 


1746 


July 


2 


W 


1724 


July 


1 


w 


1747 


July 


1 


W 


1725 


July 


7 


w 


1748 


July 


6 


W 


1726 


July 


6 


w 


1749 


June 


30 


F 


1727 


June 


30 


F 


1750 


July 


4 


W 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF MEETINGS, 1643-1750 clxix 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF MEETINGS 

1643-1750 1 



Abbreviations 
C = Corporation 

G = Governors of Harvard College 
O = Overseers 

P = President and Council for New England 
R = Rector and Tutors 



1643 


Dec. 


27 


G 


1650 


May 


6 





1654 


June 


10 






COLLEGE 


PAGE OF THESE 


BOOK 


VOLUMES 


r 1.27 


i 16 


.III. 6 


1 175 


1.44 


/ 27 


, III. 21 


\ 190 


III. 17 


186 



1 Previous to 1692, the meetings, both of the Corporation and of the Over- 
seers, are entered in such a haphazard way that a chronological list is necessary. 
Yet its compilation presents difficulties. Thus, it is not always stated whether 
a meeting is one of the Corporation or of the Overseers. When, at such meet- 
ings, business was transacted that could be done now only by the Corporation 
— such, for instance, as the election of a President or a Treasurer or a Fellow — 
the temptation is strong to assume that they were Corporation meetings. Yet 
it would be rash to label such meetings C, because for nearly a century there was 
controversy between the Corporation and the Overseers as to the exact powers 
of each, and as a matter of fact even Presidents were elected by the Overseers 
or appointed by the Legislature. (On this point, see our Publications, xxi. 147, 
152-154, 367-370, 382-387, 393.) Hence, while the chances are that most, if not 
all, of such meetings were Corporation meetings, they are left without a label in 
this list. 

Again, dates are sometimes Old Style, sometimes New Style, and sometimes 
both Old Style and New Style. Where double dates are used, there can of course 
be no doubt as to the exact year; but in the two former cases, the pitfalls pre- 
sented by Old Style and New Style are such that it is almost impossible not to 
fall into one. The Editor has exercised his best judgment in giving in the list 
such dates according to New Style, but has added in a footnote the year found in 
the original. 

Once more, a month is sometimes indicated not by name, but by number. 
In such cases it is to be remembered that, previous to 1752, the first month in 
the year was March. In these cases, the difficulty lies in the uncertain way in 
which figures were employed. Thus "26.2.75 " (pp. 63, 233, below) and " 14.3.77" 
(pp. 65, 235, below) certainly mean April 26, 1675, and May 14, 1677, since "26" 
and "14" must refer to the day. But "11.2.76" (pp. 64, 235, below) might be 



clxx 



1654 



Oct. 24 



1654 


Nov. 


2 


1654 


Nov. 


27 


1654 


Dec. 


10 


1656 r 


Feb. 


28 


1656 


Aug. 


12 


1659 


Marcl 


L 1 


1659 


June 


10 


1660 






1663 


Aug. 


24 


1666 






1666 


Nov. 


28 


1667 






1667 






1667 


March 27 


1667 


March 27 


1667 


June 


17 


1667 


Dec. 


5 


1667 


Dec. 


5 


1668 2 


Jan. 


1 


1669 


June 


3 


1669 


Oct. 


4 


1670 


Feb. 


21 



1670 Sept. 27 



INTRODUCTION 








COLLEGE PAGE 


OF THESE 




BOOK VOLUMES 


» { 


III. 18 / 
III. 39 \ 


186 


206 





III. 39 


206 





III. 39 


207 


c 


III. 41 


208 




III. 40 


207 




III. 40 


207 


c 


I. 14 


10 


c 1 


' I. 61 J 
III. 36 1 


44 
205 





III. 23 


192 




III. 43 


210 





III. 25 


194 


c 


III. 43 


210 





III. 25 


194 





III. 27 


196 


/ L64 I 48 
u 1 III. 33 1 201 




III. 43 


210 


r / I. 64 / 48 
u \ III. 28 1 197 


O 


III. 52 


218 


C 


III. 52 


218 




III. 44 


210 





III. 53 


r 218 
1219 


c 


r I. 65 


r 49 


1 III. 44 1 


1 210 


c 


f I. 65 j 


r 49 


I III. 44 


1 211 




' 1.65 


' 50 


c 


1.67 


51 


III. 45 


211 




III. 61 


224 



either the 11th day of the 2nd month (i. e. April 11, 1676), or the 2nd day of the 
11th month (i. e. January 2, 1677). To add to the uncertainty, a mistake has 
occasionally been made by the scribe. In College Book I is a meeting dated 
"August, 9, 1681" (p. 68, below). When Thomas Danforth copied into College 
Book III a portion of this meeting, he dated it "Anno. 1681. 6. 9. mo." (p. 242, 
below) — thus making it November 6 instead of August 9, 1681. 

Finally, the exact date of a meeting undated or incompletely dated in the 
original records can occasionally be recovered from other sources. Thus a meet- 
ing headed "At a Corporation meeting" (pp. 72, 248, below), but without year, 
month, or day, occurred August 31, 1682, as appears from Noadiah Russell's 
Diary (New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vii. 57). See also 
p. clxxiii note 4 below. 

1 1655. 2 1667. 






CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF MEETINGS, 1643-1750 



clxxi 



1671 


Aug. 


1 


C 


1671 


Nov. 


15 


c 


1672 1 


Feb. 


12 


c 



1672 March 7 

1672 June 20 

1672 July 30 

1672 Oct. 1 

1673 3 Jan. 11 

1673 5 Jan. 20 

1673 6 Jan. 25 

1673 7 Feb. 2 

1673 8 Feb. 3 

1673 May 27 

1673 Aug. 22 

1673 Aug. 26 

1673 Sept. 15 



1673 


Sept. 


15 


1673 


Oct. 


2 


1673 


Nov. 


5 


1673 


Nov. 


20 


1674 9 


Feb. 


2 


1674 


March 


1 


1674 


April 


15 


1674 
1674 


May 
June 


4 
15 



o 
o 
c 
o 
c 




1 1671. 

2 This date is uncertain: see p. 219 notes 1-4, below. 8 1672. 
4 An italic m indicates that the entry is printed in the margin. 

6 1672. 6 1672. 7 1672. 8 1672. 9 1673. 



clxxii 



INTRODUCTION 



1674 
1674 

1674 

1674 

1675 
1675 



Nov. 10 
Dec. 3 

Dec. 11 

Dec. 21 

March 11 
March 11 



1675 March 15 



1675 
1675 
1675 

1675 

1675 

1675 
1675 
1675 

1675 

1675 

1676 
1676 

1676 

1677 

1677 

1678 

1678 
1678 



April 7 

April 7 

April 19 

April 26 

June 1 

Sept. 2 

Sept. 8 

Oct. 27 

Dec. 22 

Dec. 27 

Jan. 1 

April 11 

Aug. 22 

May 14 

Oct. 23 

Jan. 28 

March 2 1 
March 2 6 



PAGE OF THESE 
VOLUMES 

221 

231 

59 m 
228 

59 
229 
229 m 

60 
231 
232 
232 

59 m 
222 
231 
232 
233 
232 

63 
233 

63 
233 

63 
233 

64 
234 
234 

64 
234 

13 

64 
235 
235 

64 
235 

65 
235 

65 
235 

65 
235 

65 m 
\ 236 
236 

65 



1 1677. 

1 These are the same meeting. The original (College Book I. 81; p. 65 
below) is plainly dated March 6, 1678. When Danforth copied a portion of the 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF MEETINGS, 1643-1750 clxxiii 



1678 


May 


21 


1679 


June 


30 


1679 


July 


3 


1679 


Oct. 


8 


1680 l 


Feb. 


2 


1680 2 
1681 3 


Feb. 


9 


1681 


July 


12 


1681 
1681 


July 
July 


26 
28 


1681 


Aug. 


9 


1681 


Aug. 


9 


1681 


[Sept. 4 ] 


1681 


Nov. 


7 



1681 Dec. 13 C 
1682 5 Jan. 5 C 

1682 March 27 C 



COLLEGE PAGE 


OF THESE 


BOOK VOLUMES 


III. 70 


237 


1.81 1 


' 66 


III. 70 1 


238 


1.81 1 


66 


III. 71 1 


238 


1.55 


} 39 


1.82 


66 


III. 71 


238 


1.82 I 


' 67 


III. 71 1 239 


III. 72 


239 


III. 27 


196 


1.82 1 


r 68 


III. 73 1 242 


III. 72 


240 


III. 73 


241 


1.82 1 


r 68 


III. 74 1 242 


1.82 


68 


1.82 J 


f 68 


III. 74 1 


1 242 


1.83 I 


r 68 


III. 74 1 


,242 


1.83 J 


f 69 


III. 74 1 


I 243 


1.83 j 


[ 69 


III. 74 


I 243 


1.83 I 


r 70 


III. 75 


1 244 



meeting into College Book III. 70 (p. 236, below), he probably misread March 6 
for March 1. The names of those present were written in the margin (p. 236, 
below) by John Leverett, but presumably at a later date, for the name of Thomas 
Shepard appears, though he had died on December 22, 1677. 

1 1679. 

2 1679. 

8 Perhaps July 28, 1681: see p. 241, below. 

4 The month is conjectural. The meeting in both instances is headed merely 
"Anno. 1681." On August 9, which was Commencement Day, Cotton Mather 
took his second degree, and wrote: "My Father was President, so that from his 
Hand I received my Degree" (Diary, i. 26). In calling his father "President," 
Cotton Mather merely meant that he was the presiding officer. But his first 
election as President must have taken place within a month, since the choice 
was approved by the Overseers on September 8, 1681 (Massachusetts Archives, 
lviii. 109, 109a; cf. our Publications, xviii. 370 note 4). The Second Church in 
Boston refused to release him, and so he declined. 

B 1681. 











COLLEGE PAGE 


OF THESE 










BOOK VOLUMES 


1682 


April 


10 


C 


' I. 84 j 
I III. 75 1 


70 
244 


1682 


May 


4 


C 


I. 84 J 
1 III. 78 1 


y 71 
247 


1682 


Aug. 


31 x 


C 


I 1. 84 J 

I III. 78 1 


' 72 
,248 


1683 


Jan. 


10 


c 


I. 84 I 
[ III. 78 1 


' 72 
,248 


1683 


March 


5 


c 


III. 81 


250 


1683 


March 22 


\ 


r I. 85 1 
I III. 78 1 


' 72 
.248 


1683 


Dec. 


5 


\ 


f I. 89 I 
[ III. 84 1 


74 
L 253 


1684 2 


Jan. 


3 





III. 85 


254 


1684 


March 17 


c 


f I. 89 1 
i III. 85 1 


f 75 
,254 


1684 


July 


1 





f I. 93 J 
1 III. 85 1 


f 76 
,255 


1684 


July 


21 


c 


[ 1. 93 I 
[ III. 86 1 


f 77 
[256 


1684 


Sept. 







III. 86 


256 


1684 


Oct. 


1 


r / 1. 93 / 77 
u \ III. 86 1 257 


1684 


Oct. 


14 





III. 86 


257 


1684 


Oct. 


16 


c 


f 1. 93 I 
I III. 86 


r 77 

1 257 


1684 


Oct. 


30 


c 


f 1. 93 j 
I III. 86 


r 77 

I 257 


1685 


March 


2 


c 


f 1. 93 j 
I III. 86 
' 1.93 


f 77 
[257 
' 77 


1685 


March % 


c 


1.94 


78 










III. 86 


258 


1685 


May 


4 


c 


r i. 94 j 

I III. 86 


f 78 
I 258 


1685 


June 


11 





r i. 94 j 

1 III. 86 


r 78 

1 258 


1685 


July 


2 


c - 


f 1. 95 
{ III. 86 


1 79 
[258 


1685 


Sept. 


8 




1.94 


79 


1685 


Sept. 


15 


c \ 


f I. 95 

I III. 86 < 


f 79 

I 258 


1685 


Nov. 


25 
bove. 


C 1 


f I. 95 j 
{ III. 86 


f 80 
[259 


1 See p. < 


^Ixx note, a 




2 1683. 













CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF MEETINGS, 1643-1750 



clxxv 



1686 


April 


12 


C 


1686 


April 


25 


C 


1686 


July 


8 


C 


1686 


July 


23 


P 


1686 


Oct. 


1 


R 


1687 


March 


I 8 


R 


1687 


April 


22 


R 


1690 


June 


2 


C 


1690 


June 


12 


O 


1690 


June 


16 


C 


1690 


Aug. 


19 


C 


1691 


April 


20 


C 


1691 


Aug. 


24 


C 


1691 


Dec. 


24 


C 


1692-1750 1 




C 


1708 


Jan. 


14 


O 


1712 


Jan. 


17 


O 


1712 


June 


17 




1712 


July 


2 


O 


1712 


July 


9 


O 


1712 


July 


25 


O 


1712 


Sept. 


20 




1712 


Nov. 


5 


O 


1714 


July 


7 


O 


1714 


Oct. 


7 


O 


1714 


Dec. 


11 




1716 


April 


16 


O 


1717 


Nov. 


14 


O 


1720 


June 


23 


O 


1720 


Nov. 


22 


O 



COLLEGE PAGE 


OF THESE 


BOOK VOLUMES 


" I. 96 J 


' 80 


III. 88 1 


.262 


' I. 96 I 


80 


III. 88 1 


.262 


I. 96 J 


81 


III. 88 1 


[262 


' IV. 352 


827 


IV. 352 


828 


' I. 97 i 


r si 


IV. 352 


I 828 


' I. 97 J 


f 81 


, IV. 352 


[828 


IV. 352 


828 


IV. 352 


828 


IV. 352 


829 


IV. 351 


829 


IV. 351 


830 


IV. 351 


831 


IV. 350 


832 


IV. 5-316 


339-823 


IV. 30 


381 


IV. 41 


399 


IV. 43 


402 


IV. 43 


402 


IV. 44 


403 


IV. 44 


404 


IV. 45 


406 


IV. 45 


406 


IV. 53 


422 


IV. 54 


424 


IV. 54 


425 


IV. 59 


434 


IV. 61 


439 


IV. 67 


450 


IV. 68 


453 



1 Beginning with July 26, 1692, and ending with September 5, 1750, the 
Corporation meetings are entered in chronological order, and hence need not be 
inserted in the above list. But interspersed among these Corporation meetings 
there are recorded about fifteen Overseers' meetings (from 1712 to 1735) and three 
or four other meetings, which are included in the list. 



clxxvi 



VI 






INTRODUCTION 


COLLEGE 
BOOK 


PAGE OF THESE 
VOLUMES 


1727 


Sept. 


14 





IV. 125 


556 


1734 


Sept. 


24 


c 


1.206 


155 


1734 


Sept. 


24 





1.206 


155 


1735 


Sept. 


30 


° i 


' I. 206 
; IV. 184 


/ 155 
\639 


1735 


Sept. 


30 


<> 1 


1.206 
IV. 184 m 


f 155 
1 640 m 



Albert Matthews 

Boston, December 1, 1924 






COUNCIL 



OF 



C^e Colonial Society of ^pajsjsac^ujsettjs 

December 1, 1924 



f&re?ibent 
FRED NORRIS ROBINSON, Ph.D Cambridge 

#ice-f&re£ibent£ 

Hon. ARTHUR PRENTICE RUGG, LL.D Worcester 

Rev. GEORGE FOOT MOORE, LL.D Cambridge 

Ifacorbing .^ecretatg 
ARTHUR STANWOOD PIER, A.B Milton 

Corre£ponbm0 &eeretac? 
Rev. CHARLES EDWARDS PARK, D.D Boston 

(Creagurer 
WILLIAM CROWNINSHIELD ENDICOTT, A.B. ..... Danvers 

2fte0#trat 
ALFRED JOHNSON, Litt.D . Brookline 

<£jcecutitoe Sternberg 

FRANCIS RUSSELL HART, Esq Boston 

STEPHEN WILLARD PHILLIPS, LL.B Salem 

FREDERIC WINTHROP, A.B Hamilton 

<5bitor of ^ubficationg 
ALBERT MATTHEWS, A.B Boston 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 

IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ENROLMENT 



1892 
Henry Winchester Cunningham, A.B. 
Charles Sedgwick Rackemann, A.M. 

1893 
George Wigglesworth, A.M. 
Waldo Lincoln, A.B. 
Charles Montraville Green, M.D. 
George Lyman Kittredge, LL.D. 
Walter Cabot Baylies, A.B. 
Frank Brewster, A.M. 

1894 
George Nixon Black, Esq. 

1896 
Charles Francis Mason, A.B. 
Albert Matthews, A.B. 

1897 
William Coolidge Lane, A.B. 
Hon. William Cushing Wait, A.M. 



John Eliot Thayer, A.M. 

1S99 
Frederic Haines Curtiss, Esq. 

1901 
James Atkins Noyes, A.B. 

1902 
Rev. James Hardy Ropes, D.D. 
Francis Apthorp Foster, Esq. 



1903 
John Noble, LL.B. 

WlNTHROP HOWLAND WADE, A.M. 

Hon. Augustus Peabody Loring, LL.B. 

1906 
William Vail Kellen, LL.D. 
Robert Dickson Weston, A.B. 
Henry Lefavour, LL.D. 
Francis Randall Appleton, LL.B. 
Arthur Lord, LL.D. 

1908 
Rev. William Wallace Fenn, D.D. 
Julius Herbert Tuttle, Esq. 
Rev. Charles Edwards Park, D.D. 
Ogden Codman, Esq. 

1909 

WORTHINGTON CHAUNCEY FORD, LL.D. 

Harold Murdock, A.M. 

Rev. Edward Caldwell Moore, D.D. 

1910 
Archibald Cary Coolidge, LL.D. 
Ezra Henry Baker, A.B. 
John Whittemore Farwell, Litt.B. 
Frederick Jackson Turner, LL.D. 
John Woodbury, A.B. 
Rev. George Foot Moore, LL.D. 
Edward Percival Merritt, A.B. 
Hon. Arthur Prentice Rugg, LL.D. 

1911 
Mark Antony DeWolfe Howe, Litt.D. 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



clxxix 



1912 
Clarence Saunders Brigham, A.M. 
Fred Norris Robinson, Ph.D. 
Roger Bigelow Merriman, D.Litt. 
Chester Notes Greenottgh, Ph.D. 
Samuel Eliot Morison, Ph.D. 
Hon. Robert Grant, Litt.D. 



1913 
Allan Forbes, A.B. 

Charles Lemuel Nichols, M.D., Litt.D. 
Samuel Chester Clough, Esq. 
Hon. Charles Grenfill Washburn, A.B. 
Alfred Claghorn Potter, A.B. 
Francis Henshaw Dewey, A.M. 
Edward Kennard Rand, Ph.D. 

1914 
Charles Hall Grandgent, Litt.D. 
Hon. Charles John McIntire 



1915 
Francis Russell Hart, Esq. 
Samuel Henshaw, A.M. 
Augustus George Bullock, A.B. 
Hon. Winslow Warren, LL.B. 
Edward Channing, LL.D. 
Rev. Henry Wilder Foote, A.M. 
Stephen Willard Phillips, LL.B. 
Alfred Johnson, Litt.D. 

1916 
George Parker Winship, Litt.D. 
Lawrence Shaw Mayo, A.M. 
Richard Clipston Sturgis, A.B. 
Nathaniel Thayer Kidder, B.A.S. 



1918 
William Crowninshield Endicott, A.B. 
Frederick Cheever Shattuck, M.D., 

LL.D. 
Hon. James Parker Parmenter, A.M. 



1919 
Charles Rockwell Lanman, LL.D. 
Henry Goddard Pickering, A.M. 
Robert Gould Shaw, A.M. 
Samuel Williston, LL.D. 
Morris Gray, LL.B. 

1920 
George Henry Haynes, Ph.D. 
Alfred Lawrence Aiken, A.M. 



1921 
Hon. Frederick Lawton, A.B. 
George Hubbard Blakeslee, Ph.D. 
William Bradford Homer Dowse, LL.B. 
Wilbur Cortez Abbott, Litt.D. 



1922 
George Pomeroy Anderson, LL.B. 
Francis Tiffany Bowles, U.S.N.A. 
Walter Austin, LL.B. 
Homer Gage, M.D. 
Arthur Stanwood Pier, A.B. 
James Melville Hunnewell, LL.B. 



1923 
Kenneth Ballard Murdock, Ph.D. 
Rt. Rev. Charles Lewis Slattery, D.D. 
Frank Brewer Bemis, Esq. 



1924 
Frederic Winthrop, A.B. 
Hon. Benjamin Loring Young, LL.B. 
Edward Motley Pickman, LL.B. 
Edward Waldo Forbes, A.M. 
Alfred Marston Tozzer, Ph.D. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



1910 
Hon. Elihu Root, LL.D. 

1913 
Hon. William Howard Taft, LL.D. 



1922 
John Singer Sargent, LL.D. 



CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 



1898 
John Franklin Jameson, LL.D. 
Hon. Simeon Eben Baldwin, LL.D. 

WlLBERFORCE EAMES, LL.D. 

Rev. William Jewett Tucker, LL.D. 

1899 
Edward Field, A.B. 
Arthur Twining Hadley, LL.D. 

1903 
George Arthur Plimpton, LL.D. 

1904 
Herbert Putnam, LL.D. 

1905 
Rev. John Carroll Perkins, D.D. 
Clarence Winthrop Bowen, LL.D. 
Appleton Prentiss Clark Griffin, Esq. 

1906 
William Logan Rodman Gifford, A.B. 

1907 
Thomas Willing Balch, L.H.D. 

1908 
James Kendall Hosmer, LL.D. 
Frank Warren Hackett, A.M. 

1910 
Edward Robinson, LL.D. 



1912 
Edward Vanderhoof Bird, Esq. 

1913 
Edgar Huidekoper Wells, A.B. 

1915 
Charles McLean Andrews, L.H.D. 
Evarts Boutell Greene, Ph.D. 

1917 
Edmund Burke Delabarre, Ph.D. 
William MacDonald, LL.D. 
George Burton Adams, Litt.D. 

1918 
Hon. Frederic Adrian Delano, A.B. 
Otis Grant Hammond, A.M. 

1920 
George Russell Agassiz, A.B. 

1922 
James Benjamin Wilbur, Esq. 
John Pierpont Morgan, LL.D. 

1924 
William Otis Sawtelle, A.M. 
William Keeney Bixby, LL.D. 
William Davis Patterson, Esq. 
Kenneth Charles Morton Sills, LL.D 



COLLEGE BOOK 
I 



NOTE 

The number of the College Book is given in the headline of every left- 
hand page. 

The heavy face figures within square brackets indicate the paging of 
the original. For details, see the Introduction to this volume. 

All entries, even when erased or crossed out in the original, are printed 
in the text, provided they are decipherable. 

Words crossed out are, if decipherable, printed in lined type; if not 
decipherable, the fact is stated in a footnote. Where an entire entry has 
been crossed out, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

Where a word has been crossed out and another word written above 
it, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

Where a word has been erased or altered, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

If a word or words are interlined, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

Words or letters supplied on account of torn page, illegibility, etc., are 
printed in italics within square brackets. A blank space within square 
brackets indicates that words or letters are either illegible or torn away. 

In entries written in Latin, abbreviations are expanded in italics, and 
letters omitted without marks of abbreviation are placed within square 
brackets. 

All entries in the original are in ink, unless otherwise specified in 
footnotes. 

A Glossary of terms requiring explanation is printed at the end of 
the volume, preceding the Index. 



HARVARD COLLEGE RECORDS 

College Book N°. I. 2 

Baccalaureorum Prsesentatio. 3 

Supplicat Reverentiis vestris A. B. ut qwadriennium ab admissione 
completum quo ordinarias Lectiones 4 audiverit una cum disputa- 
tionibus declamationi[6ws] cseterisque exercitiis per statuta Collegii 
requisitis, (licet non omnino secundum formam statuti) sufficiat ei 
ad primum gradum in Artibus suscipiendum. 

Magistrorum prsesentatio in Angh'a. 

Supplicat reverentijs vestris N. N. ut novem termini completi post 
finalem eju[s] determinationem, in quihus ordinarias lectiones audi- 
verit (licet non omnino secundum formam statuti) una cum omnibws 
oppositionibws, responsionibws, Declamationibws cseterisqwe exercitijs 
p[er] statuta regia requis[^f)s, sufficiant ei ad incipiendum in Artibws. 

[2 5 ] 

1 For details in regard to pagination, see the Introduction to the present 
volume. 

2 These words are in the hand of President Wadsworth. After this entry 
have been scribbled, in an unknown hand, the following words : 

4570 
College Book 1723 
most mighty most 

S J Q 

most 

mighty mighty 

The reading " S J Q " is doubtful. Also a few words, of which only " God 
I " are decipherable, have been written at the bottom of the page, the book 
having been turned upside down. 

3 This entry and the next entry are in the hand of A. 

4 Substituted for " disputationes," crossed out. 

5 Page [2] is blank. 



4 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[3] 

An Account ■ of the Glasse taken of Christopher Grant of Watter-Towne, 

March 5 164 1. 

Inprimis, In the Hall & Schoole 112 f 112-0 

Ite, In the Library 35 f 035-0 

Ite. In the Kitchen 18 f -£ 018-J 

The Chamber over y e Schoole 25-f 

Item In the Lanthorne 12 f 012-0 

Ite in the Turret 18 f Staire Case 8 f 026-0 

Alcocks 2 Studdy & Stowes 7 f -£ 007-± 

D ns Alins 8 Studdy & Welds 7 f -4 007-a 

D ns Saltonstals * Studdy 5 f ~4 005-§ 

Stowes 5 Chamber 6M)-0-0 6 006-0 ^ 

D ns Saltonstalls Chamber 17 f 017-0 > 

D ns Bellingams 9 Chamber 10 f 010-0 

D as Buckleyes 10 Chamber 31 f 031-0 

Winthrops Studdy l f -0-i 001-J 

M r Parish u his Studdy 4U . . . . ' 004-^ 

M r Harris his Chaber 6 f 12 006-0 

M r President 3 l f -0-£ 031-£ 

Bradfords Princes Starres 13 & Cottons Studdyes ll f 011-0 

Hall Studdy l f -J 001-£ 

Mending glas at severall times 8 f 

ad y* was forgot 25 f f 

370 f of glas in all: Summe Total is feet 370-f 

At 10 d p foot y 6 Summe Totall in Value is all things accouted 15 16 04 

Whereof discharged by the Countrye 5** 05 00 00 

In Glasse-^-ot her wayes by 14 the President 07 08 11 

Payd by M r Weld for H. Dunster to C ofer Grant .... 4 03 01 1S 

1 This account is in the hand of B. 

2 Under Alcock's name is written in pencil " A.B. 1646." 
8 Under Allin's name is written in pencil "A.B. 1643." 

4 Under SaltonstalPs name is written in pencil "A.B. 1642." 

c Under Stow's name is written in pencil "A.B. 1645." 

Altered from " 6 f -0-0~i " to " 6MMH)." 

7 Altered from " 006-^ " to " 006-0." 

8 Apparently altered from " 007-0 " to " 017-0." 

8 Under Bellingham's name is written in pencil "A.B. 1642." 
i° Under Bulkley's name is written in pencil "A.B. 1642." 
u On the extreme right of the page is written in pencil "his son 1659." Thomas 
Parish graduated in the class of 1659. 
12 Altered from " 6 f £ " to " 6 f 0." 

" Above the name of Starr is written in pencil "1647." 
14 Written over " of." 

16 These figures have been altered. The original figures are undecipherable. 
18 Page [4] is blank. 



GIFTS AND FELLOWS ACCOUNTS 5 

[5 1 ] 

Acco* of the Colledg Elemosynary Revenew as to the respective 
donees it hath bin issued so far as hath come to knowledge of L. H. 
& by his notes to m r D. pr 

M r Webbs gift. 
M r Jer: Shephard to ffe 
Nath H Gookin his successor fro him 

toffeb rii 13 04" --"-- 

M r Nath. Higinso to the Comencem* 1673 3" - - u - - 

Nath Gookin ab 1 2 ffeb rij 26 had a note for 

his toNov r 13: 1673. 



The Scholarships 
S r Thacher to the Comencem* 1673 



3"--" 



[6 



The If ellowes have had 



Off the Prsesid ts Salary fro ^ 
Octo r to Dec r 10. 1672 
paid p the Treasurer 

By m r Glovers gift 
5 lb p annu to ffeb rij 
9 th : 1672 3 years then 
due 



M r Brown 
M r Richardson 
M r Oakes 
M ra Nowell 

M r Brown 
M r Richardson 
M ra Nowell 



[7-8 3 ] 
[9] 



ffrom the fferry 



Sir Bulkleys Study. 4 




30 // -- 1 '- 



Impr. For plankes 0-16- 

It. To y e joyner 0-17-10 

It. For hinges, lock & nayles, . 7-4 d 



This Study let to Sir Ames 
December 1645 6 



1 The entries on pages [5-6] of the text are in the hand of President Hoar. 

2 The word "ab*" is interlined. 

3 Pages [7-8] are blank, about a third being cut off. 

4 This account is in the hand of C. 

5 Under this entry is written in pencil f'A.B. 1645." 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



It. 


For Glasse 


0-2-6 


It. 


For dawbing y e walles . . 


-0-6 
fc s d 
2- 4- 2 




Suma 


It. 


Ye Charges of y e chamber 






belonging yereto . . . 


0-13-4 




P me Johannem 






Bulkleyu Novem : 17. 






1643. 





The expenses on Thomas Paris his study * 

Bricks 0-12-00 This study Let to John Bear- 
Carting 0-03-08 don ye 29 th of y e 8 th 1644 2 

Mentletree 0-01-08 

Clay 0-02-06 

Masons work 0-12-00 

Board . 0-10-00 

Joyners work , 0-13-00 

Nayles 0-01-06 

Table & jimews 0-02-06 

Lock & more gemmows 0-03-00 

Seeling C 0-00-10 

Calking 0-01-00 

The glass 0-01-00 

3-04- 8 
Thomas Parrish 



1645 November : 1. This 
study let to Abraham Waiver. 





S r Brewsters Study. 3 






fb s d 


Impr. 


ffor 200 foot of pine boards 


0-12- 


It 


ffor 8 dayes worke & an halfe 


0-14- 8 si 


It 


ffor halfe a dayes worke to 
y e mason & somew* 






more 


0- 1- 


It. 


ffor 3 foot of glasse .... 


0- 2- 6 


It. 


ffor small gimmalls .... 


0- 0- 7 


It. 


ffor greater hinges .... 


0- 2- 6 


It. 


ffor * nayles, locke & key . 


0- 5-10 5 
lb 

1-19- 1 




Suma Totalis . . . 


It. 


y e Charges of y e chamber . 


0-13- 4 
2-12- 5 



1 This account is in the hand of D. 

' J Under tlus entry is written in pencil "grad. 1647." John Birden was a 
graduate of that Class. 

3 This account is in the hand of E. 

4 A letter or word is here crossed out. 

«* To the right of this entry is written in pencil ''graduated 1642. v 



STUDY AND CHAMBER ACCOUNTS 



Sir Downings Study. 1 



lb s d 






0-16- 3-ob. 


Qj 


Let to Mr Danforth 
by y e Colledge 


0-19- 3 






0- 6-11 






0-2-1 






0- 3 






lb 






2- 7- 6-ob. 


qJ 




0-13- 4 






3-00-10 







Impr. ffor boards 272 ffoote . . . 
It. Ten dayes & J worke at 22 d 

a day 

It. ffor y e Smithes worke . . . 

It. ffor Glasse 

It. ffor Nayles, locke & key . . 

Suma Totalis . . 
It. The charges of y e chamber 



Samuell Wintrops study a 

Bb 

In all Particulars 2- 0-0 November y 6 first * 1645. let 

It. y e Chamber . 0-13-4 to S r Stow. 

2-13-i 

[10] 

Mr Richard Harrise Chamber * 

Sieled w th Cedar round about : • 

For y e Chimny half costs w th Tho. 

Paris w c amounts to 1-11-10 

Boarding round about w th all appur- 
tenances of workmaship nailes &c 1-1 5-00 

Glasse & Casmets 0- 6-08 

More July 18. 49. board 107 foot -lest 5 0-06-08 

More board to John Weld 93 f . . . 0-05-04 

Item 100 foot of Wiffin Trench « . 0-05-06 

Item 300 8 d Nailes 0-02-00 

Glass mending 0-03-00 

Joiners work by sd Weld 0-12-00 

A form & table 0-11-00 

A key 8 d & smal nayles 3 d ... 0-00-11 

Totall — 5-19-11 



This account is in the hand of F. 
This account is in the hand of G. 
A word is here crossed out. 
This account is in the hand of H. 
This word is doubtful. 
Perhaps " French." 



8 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[ii] 

Sir Brewsters study. 1 

s 

For two hundred foote of pine Boards 12-00 

For eight dayes worke & an halfe . . 14-08 
For halfe a dayes work to the mason 

and some what upward .... 01-00 

For three foote of glasse 02-06 

For small gimmalls 00-07 

For greater hinges 02-06 

For Nayles & other appurtenances 

from the Iron Monger 04-08 

For a Locke & key 01-02 

Summa Totalis 
-01-18-01 

The Studies of Hiest East Chamber. 

Sir Bellinghams Study This study left by S r Belling- 

ham w tla Sampson Eiton. & 
after to; Will Stoughton. 
[12 2 ] 

[13] 



Sir Downings Study. 3 



4 - - 



11 s d 
Boards 272 foote at 6^ y e hunderd 4 - ob. s± 

Tenne dayes \ worke of a man 
and halfe - at 22 pence a day 

s e 

For the Smithes Worke 0G-11 

sh. tr 

For Glasse 02-01 

Six penny Nayles 200 1-00 

sh. 

For Locke & key 02-00 

The Library Chambers Studies. 5 



1 This Brewster account, in the hand of I, is crossed out in the original. The 
remaining entries on page [11] are in the hand of J. 

3 Page [12] is blank. 

8 This Downing account, in the hand of K, is crossed out in the original. 

4 The spaces under shillings and pence are left blank, because the figures, hav- 
ing been crossed out, are undecipherable: but they were doubtless "16-3" and 
"19-3." Sec page [9] of the text, or page 7 of this volume. 

8 This entry is in the hand of L. At the right are some words crossed out. 



STUDY AND CHAMBER ACCOUNTS 



Impr. 300 foot of board . . 

It. Carpenters worke . . 

It. Nayles, locke & hinges 

It. Glasse 



Suma Totalis 3 



John Brookes Study. 1 

d 
0-18- 
0-19- 4 
0- 7-11 
0-1-2 
H s d 
2-6-5 



Josiah Winslow his Study 3 

All y 6 Appurtenances of his study 2-10- Let to Jonathan Michil 

All y e Appurtenances of Chaber &c 00-18- April 1646 veta 4 

3-08- 

John Newton or George Stirk his Study. 5 

Board 297^ foot 00-17-10 Let to George Stirk 1644 

Nayles & Joynts 00-2-2 - wr^out charging hkn w^ -ys- 

Spring Lock 00- 3-00 ^ftfeixr-S 

Glasse 00- 2-00 

Toy e Joyner 00-16-00 

; n ,11 

for Masons work 00- 3- 6 

02-04- 5 
Cabin w th - sir Allins for w c y e Coll : 

paydM r Allin 00-09-09 

John Allin his Studdy 7 
f 

Boards 226 foot 00-13- 6-2 Let to Nath. Whyte 1644. 8 

Nayles & Joynts 00-5-8-2 

Glasse 00- 1- 3-0 

A Lock 00- 2- 6-0 9 

Carpenters Work : 1- 1- 3-2 10 

Masons Work 00-3-0-0 

2- 7-03-2 
Item for a pt of a Ca^bm belong- 
ing to the same Study . . . 00-09-08-1 

Ite in one 8 th Share of y e Chamber 09-06-0 

3- 6- 5-3 

1 This account is in the hand of M. 

2 Under this line is written in pencil "grad. 1646." 

3 This account is in the hand of N. 

4 Under this entry is written in pencil "grad. 1647." 

5 This account is in the hand of O. 

6 Under this entry is written in pencil "grad. 1646." 

7 This account is in the hand of P. 

8 Under this entry is written in pencil "grad. 1646." 

8 To the right of this entry is written in pencil "grad. 1643. s? 
10 These figures have been altered. 



10 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[14] 

March 1. 1659. 1 

Concluded by the Corporation first that old Mary bee yet con- 
nived at to bee in the Colledge w th a charge to take heed to doe her 
worke undertake & to give content to the Colledge & students 

Concluded by the Corporation: that the stranger motioned by 
M r Norton is 4s- not thought fit for the discharge of the butlers place, 
in regard that so many schollars stand in need of such an helpe. 

[15] 

The Hiest West Chamber. 3 

A note of the Expences of John Weld about his study & bed. 

l s d 
Impr. For 200 inch 3 of boards . 0-16-0- ob. 
It. For ye workmanship ... 1- 2-0- 4 

It. For halfe inch boards . . 0- 2-0- 

It. For nayles 0- 4-6- -ebr 

It. For hinges 0- 3-9- 

It. For glasse 0- 0-4— 

It. For a lock 0- 2-0- 

It. For dawbing y e sides ... 0- 4-6- 

H s d 
Suma 2-15-1- ob- 

Expences for S r Alcocks Study. 6 

l s d 

Inpr. ffor Boards to Goodm. Stow 00-16-00 

It ffor John Tailours worke 00-15-07 

It ffor a locke 00-01-04 

It 200 of 8 d nailes 00-01-04 

It 100 of 4d nailes 00-00-04 

It 50 6 d nailes 00-00-03 

It for Hinges 00-02-04 

It for window-hookes 00-00-04 

It for Glasse 00-03-00 

It for halfe a dayes worke more .... 00-00-11 9 

It for plaistring ye Study 00-01-00 

Sum 02-02-05 

1 This entry is in the hand of President Chauncy. 

2 This account is in the hand of Q. 

8 The word "inch" is interlined, but in the wrong place, "inch boards" being 
meant. 

« Apparently altered from "0-2-0." 
6 This account is in the hand of R. 
• To the right is written in pencil "grad. 1646." 






STUDY AND CHAMBER ACCOUNTS 11 

ffor S r Alcocks Bed roome l w cl1 was to him alone 

1 s d 

Imp. 4 dayes worke of J. Tailour .... 00-07-04 

It Boards 00-06-00 

It Nailes 00-00-10 

It 2 paire of Hinges 00-00-08 

It Glasse 00-01-00 

It Masons worke 00-03-00 

Sum. 00-18-10 

It ffor ye whiteing, lathing, Doore-boards 

& workmanship of y e chamber 
three bushels of Mault to Richard 
y e Mason 2 

The income of S r Alcockes Study & Bed-roome 

for one only to have, abating for repaire 1 s d 
of y e chamber y e mault is (03-01-03. 

[16 s ] 

[17] 

Samuel Stow his studyes account & bed together 4 

a s d 

Impr. for board 231 foot 00-15-0 

It 15 foote more 00-1-0 

It for worke 01-1-3 

It for Locks, boult & hinges 00- 4-3 

It for glasse . 0- 1-6 

It for Nayles 0-2-2 

The midle west Chamber 5 

a s d 
Suina ... 2- 5-2 

S r Saltonstalls study. 8 

a s d 

Impr. 227 foot of board 0-14-10 Let to S r Alcock 

It. for Joyners worke ......... 0-19- 3 

It for Table plancks 0-1-0 

It for hinges, locke, & Nailes 0-8-0 

It for glasse 0-1-4 

It Greene say & Nailes 0-2-0 

Suma 7 . . . 2-6-5 



1 The word "roome" is interlined. 

2 Two or three figures, here crossed out, are undecipherable. 

3 Page [16] is blank. 

4 This Stow entry, in the hand of S, is crossed out in the original. 
6 Under this entry is written in pencil "grad. 1645." 

6 This account is in the hand of T. 

7 A word is here crossed out, perhaps " totalis." 



12 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Chamber. 

a s d 

Imp. Laths 0-3-0 

It. Daubing 0-12-0 

It Joyners worke 0- 6-0 

It ffor y« hearth 0-1-0 

a s d 

Suma ... 1- 2-0 

Totall of both l 3-8-5 

[18 2 ] 

[19] 

John Brockes Studyes Account. 3 

a s d 

Imp. 300 foot of board 0-18- 

It for Carpenters worke 0-19- 4 

It forNayles 0- 1-11 

It for lock & hinges 0-6-0 

It for glasse 0-1-2 

Item for pt of ye table, & Cabin 0-3-7 

11 s d 
Suma 4 . . . 2-10- 5 

[20 6 ] 
[21] 



Bradfords Study. 



11 3 d 

Imp. for board 0-13- 9- q. 

It For worke 0-17-10- ob. 

It for Nayles 0- 2- 5- .q. 

It for Gimews 0-3-6- 

11 s d 

Suina . . . 1-16-07 

the right to a Cabin in y e great chaber . . . 0-03-05 



22 



i Under this entry is written in pencil "grad. 1642." 

2 Page [18] is blank. 

3 This account is in the hand of U. 

4 Under this entry is written in pencil "grad. in 1646." 

6 This figure has apparently been altered. 
e Page [20] is blank. 

7 This account is in the hand of V. 

8 Page [22] is blank. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1673-1675 13 

[23 1 ] 

Starr his Study. 2 

s d 
Impr. For board ............ 13- 9 

It forworke 17-10 

It for Nayles lock & hinges 8-5 

H s d 
Suma 3 . . . 2-0-0 

Aug st 22 d 1673 4 

A Corporation meeting being before warned only M* Oakes 5 M r 
Richards and L H p r sent nothing done because no more present only 
agreed another shoul[d] he warned ag* Aug st 26. 1673. 

Aug 26 1673 

Another meeting of M r Oakes Shephard Richard [s] & L H (m r 
Brown pV but sd he had yesterday layd down his place as he solemnly 
& freely did t[o] L H) but voted they would doe nothing untill y* 
W Richardson was present who was now a journey to Conecticut. 6 

At a Corporation Meeting at Cambridge 27. 10°. 75. 7 

present 
m r President 

I Shephard 
mr < Gookins 

I Richards 8 



1 Only a portion of the original leaf remains, that containing the account of 
"Starr his Study." The leaf is pieced out with two fragments which perhaps 
do not properly belong to College Book I — one containing two entries for 1673, 
the other one entry for 1675. 

2 This account is in the hand of W. 

3 Under this entry is written in pencil "gr. 1647." 

4 This entry and the next entry are in the hand of President Hoar. 

5 The words " M r Oakes " are written over a word or two erased. 

6 Under this entry are scribbled in an unknown hand a few words and let- 
ters, partly decipherable, partly undecipherable : 

Per Integrum 
Biennium quo apud 
per illus tempws 

7 This entry it in the hand of X. 

8 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



14 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



]\F Daniel Russel chosen to be fellow & to be presented to the 
Overseers for See P. 54 l 

[24*] 



[25] 



Prince his Study. 3 



a s d 

Imp. For board 0-13- 9- 

It. for worke 0-17-10- ob 

It. for Nayles 0- 2- 5- q_ 

It for gimews 0-3-6-0 

a s d -q_ 
Sunia. 1-17- 6-3 4 



The studdies in Harvard College with their Incoms & 
quarterly Rents 5 



1 Imprimis The Senio 1 " fellow's studdy in y e great 

chamber 

1 
in ye corner west off y e buttery Incoin 4 6 -0-0 

- Quart 

His sizers studdy over y e porch off that 

Chamber 

2 In The lower East chamber y e studdy by y e 

Halt 

The middle studdy next therto 

The norther-most studdy in y e same row . . . 

The corner studdy over against it 

[3] The low Chamber westward off this betwix it, & 

ye Turret 

4 The studdy with y e fire in it over this little 

chamber 

The little studdy next to it East-ward .... 



Income 


Qters rent 


li s d 


a 


05 -00-00-0 


00 - 2-06 


047-00- 0-0 


OO-^-OO-O 


01 -10- 0-0 


00 -00-09-0 


03 -00- 0-0 


00 -01-06-0 


03 -00- 0-0 


00 -01-06-0 


03 -00- 0-0 


00 -01-06-0 


03 -00- 0-0 


00 -01-06-0 


03 -10- 0-0 


00 -01-09-0 


03 -04- S-0 


00 -01-08-0 


01 -00-00-0 


00 -00-06-0 



1 The words " See P. 54 " are in the hand of President Quincy. The refer- 
ence is to page [80] of the text, or page 64 of this volume. 
■ Page [24] is blank. 

3 This account is in the hand of Y. 

4 These figures have been altered. 

6 This account is in the hand of Z. 
Altered from " o." 

7 Altered from " 5." 

8 Altered from "00-02-06-0." 



STUDY INCOMES AND RENTS 



15 



[9] 



10 



11 



In y e East middle-chamber y e Souther-most 

studdy 

The middle study 

The Norther-most study in y e same row . . . 

The corner study over against it 

In y e highest East Chamber, y e Southermost 

study 

The middlemost study 

The norther-most study 

In y e turret, y e South-East study .... 

The North-East studdy 

The North-west study 

The South-west study 

In y e Great Chamber next y e library, the East 

study next y e Library 

The west study in the Corner 

The west study w th ye fire ....... 

The middle west study 

In y e middle chamber over ye kitchins The 

souther-most study 

The middle study 

The norther-most study 

The corner study over agst it 

The study in y e chamber East off this over y e 

Larder 

In y e highest Chamber over y e kitchin y e study 

w th ye fi re 

The middlemost study 

The corner study next to it 

The lowest study in the turret 



Income 


Qters rent 


li s d 


s 


02 -17-06-0 


00 -01-06-0 


02 -12-05-0 


00 -01-04-0 


03 -00-10-0 


00 -01-06-0 


02 -13-04-0 


00 -01-04-0 


03 -00-00-0 


00 M)l-06-0 


02 -10-00-0 


00 -01-03-0 


02 -10- 0-0 


00 -01-03-0 


02 -00- 0-0 


00 M)1-00-0 


02 -00- 0-0 


002-01-00-0 


02 -00- 0-0 


00 2 -0 1-00-0 


02 -00- 0-0 


00 -01-00-0 


02 -10- 0-0 


00 3 -01-03-0 


03 M)8-00-0 


00 -01-09-0 


03 5 -06-05-0 


00 -01-08-0 


02 -13-09-0 


00 -01-04-0 


02 -10-00-0 


00 -01-03-0 


03 -08-05-0 


00 -01-09-0 


02 -10-00-0 


00 -01-03-0 


02 -10-00-0 


00 -01-03-0 


02 -10-00-0 


00 -01-03-0 


03 e-05-01-0 


00 -01-08-0 


03 -01-03-0 


00 7 -01-06-0 


02 -10-00-0 


00 -01-03-0 


03 8 -00-00-0 


00 -01-O6-0 


94 -11 - 8 


02 9 -07-6 



[26 10 ] 



1 Apparently altered from "01-00-06-0." 

2 Apparently altered from "01-00-00-0." 

3 Apparently altered from "00-01-07-0." 

4 These figures have been altered, but the original figures cannot be deciphered 
with certainty. 

5 Apparently altered from "01-06-05-O." 
8 Apparently altered from "03-05-00-0." 

7 Apparently altered from "01-01-06-0." 

8 This figure has apparently been altered. 

9 Apparently altered from "02-08-6." 

10 Page [26] is blank. 



16 COLLEGE BOOK I 



[27] 



At the meeting of the Governours of Harvard Colledge, held 
in the Colledge-Hall this 27 of 10 th — 1643. 1 

It is ordered that, 

1. The Accounts of M r Harvards Gift are to be finished, & M r 
Pelha", M r Nowell, W Hibbons, 2 M* Syms, M r Wilson are chosen to 3 
finish it, y* an acquittance may be given M r Allin. And its agreed 
y* if they find things cleare in the fullfilling the will of the dead they 
are to desire the Governour of y e Colledge his hand to it as a full 
determination & acquittance. 

2. M r Pelha is elected Treasurer of the Colledge by the joynt vote 
of the Governours of the Colledge. 

3. It is ordered that there shall be a Colledge seale in forme 
following 4 

4. A coppy of W Adams & W Coalsons letter to M r Eaton 

M r Eaton, 

After o r love remembred to you whereas we understood by your 
former letter that the monny w ch was appoynted heretofore for pub- 
lique uses was not all yet disposed of, we therefore for our parts, 
desire that w* is yet remayning, may be expended wholly about the 
building of the New Colledge at Cambridge, in N. England, w ch we 
understand is now erecting. So we rest your loveing ffriends 

Thomas Adams 
Christopher Coalson 
26 March 1640. 

This money was wholy put into the hands of my brother Nath: 
Eaton Aug. 9. 1647. 6 F. Theoph: Eaton.e 



1 The record of this meeting has hitherto been supposed to be in the hand of 
President Dunster, but this is a mistake. It is in the hand of AA. 

2 Perhaps "Hibbins." 

3 A word is here crossed out. 

* Here follows the design reproduced in facsimile, facing this page. 
6 The date 1G47 is underscored. 

• In the original, the paragraphs of this record are separated from each other 
by wide spaces. These two interpolated lines are in the hand of Theophilus Eaton. 






I 



d4 



9 4 «J 




*^> 



Si 






^ rig 

. ^ h ■,, i J 



asiw 








c^ 



t*. 






It 4W 












*!S 



$ 



'<§ 1 1 







Cj >-n|^ 



k 






^ 



^JZ/£6J 



SAMUEL SHEPARD'S ACCOUNT 17 

5. ffor the 10 H p Annu in respect of the Lady Moulsons gift of 
100 tt , its deferred for 2 Reasons, first because we have not the monny. 
And 2^ we cannot give any thing out of Country Treasury, till a 
Generall Court, had we the monny in hand we would p r sently 
effect it. 

6. It is ordered that 2 Batchelours shall be chosen for the p r sent 
helpe of the p r sident, to read to the Junior pupills as the p r sident 
shall see fitt, & be allowed out of the Colleadge Treasury 4 H p Annu 
to each of the[m] for their paines. 

S r Bulkly, & S r Downing are appoynted for that service to con- 
tinue for this yeare. 

[ 28-29 x ] 

[30 2 ] 

M r Samuel. Sheppards. Account. 

1639 Received Inprimis Cambr rate 20-00-0 

of ye ferry 50-00-0 

of M r Sparrawk & M r Gourdon «..'.. 55-00-0 

MrWilowby 25-00-0 

1641 M r Angier Corne at 4 s bushell 40-00-0 

1639 Watertown rate . .' . 30-12-0 

M r Norton 07-02-8 

In clapboards 01-13-0 

In work of Jo. Friend 07-08-0 

Of Mr Nowell 02-00-0 4 

Of M r Peeters & M r Weld ....... 10-00-0 

248-15-8 
M r Allen payd by M r Sedgw ...... 3-00-0 

ye plrs canot bee pduced 

251-15-8 

Disbursed for ye Colt as follows. 

Mony disburst by M r Eaton 12-10-0 

And to Finch Eliot & winters, & Symonds y e ix 

carpeter & goodman Harding as appears 20-17-4 



i Pages [28-29] are blank. 

2 The entries on page [30] are in the hand of BB. 

3 This name is uncertain. 

4 This figure has apparently been altered. 



18 COLLEGE BOOK I 

2 For work & materialls for y e CoTT all I Fee: of 

y e ferry 50-00-0 

3 M r Sparrawk to y e w rk men as appears . . . 55-06-0 
M r Willowby payd y e w rk men in comodities 

as appeares 21-10-0 

4 Lost by paying out y e Come rec. at 4 3 y e busll 

& payd out at two shillings eight pence 
little at 3 s and some at 2 s -6 d In ye whole 
my ould account is but lost 09-8-9 1 
I doubt it was more & payd 29-11-3 

5 Payd for Carting & other businesses & ma- 

terialls for y e Coll : as appears in glrs . . 33-10-4 

6 Payd for John friend by Mr Norton 3^-10-0 

to other workmen 3^-12-8- in all . . 7-02-8 

Mr Nowell payd for lime 02-00-0 

M r Dunster discouted w th Joh. Friend . . . 10-00-0 

229-17-7 



payd Cap: Gibbons 10-10-4 

M r storer for John friend 05-03-0 

To M 1 * Ford for Jo: Friend . 01-15-0 

To Thomas ye smith 01-05-6 

To Nash for Meat to y e workme 02-00-0 

Bricklayers 1-15-0 

M r Russell for John Friend 2-02-0 

For Rich ye Plaisterrer 0-13-0 

For ye Comodities y e w rk men had of him . . 2-06-0 

To steeven for clensing y e house 0-01-6 

To M r Sparawk 1-00-0 

To Brickmakers 2-15-0 

To Goodman Goff 01-18-3 

To Goodman Grean 2 for hair 00-02-8 

To Joh. Stedman 03-00-0 

To Mr Eldred for shooes 3 02-02-6 

38-09-9 
li 
Due to Him by this account 14-11-8 4 

Received a goat 30 s - of pte of Watertown rate w c died) 
writ on y e other syd of y e sayd pap as follows. 

Payd M r Weld for Rich Harrington a Plaisterer 03-10-0 

Payd him in Corne 00-14-0 

Putt off watertown rate lost 02-00-0 



1 Apparently altered from " 19-8-9." 

2 The first two letters in this name are uncertain. 

3 This word is uncertain. 

4 The " 4 " in " 14 " has been written over another figure. The amount 
due ought apparently to be " 16-11-8." 



STUDY AND CHAMBER ACCOUNTS 19 

In Another collum thus. A horse & charges to lin 00-05-0 

To salem twice 00-10-0 

At Boston & charlestown 01-00-0 1 

[31 2 ] 
[ ] in the [ ] in M r [ ]ouse, [ ]y were [ ] the President & ffellowes. 

M r Bennets study, 

Graves 3 his chamber & study I 63 6d & ^er. 

M r Oakes 4 & his brother chamber & studyes ' ' 

M r whiting & M r Hookers s chamber & studyes, valued at 

M r Shepheards 6 chamber studyes 

The great Chamber studyes in M r Goffes house 

The lowest Chamber studyes on the East pt of the old ]■ 5 3 by the quarter. 

house 
The two fire studyes in y e old house valued alike at 

The kitchin Chamber studyes 

The long chamber studyes, except the fire study, w th y e 

study at y e staires of y e foote of the Turret. 
The chamber & study over M r Oakes chamber in M r V 4 s by the quarter. 

Goffes house, 
The least study a loft in y* w ch was the schoolehouse 

valued at 



The Turret studyes 

The lowest chamber studyes west w th in M r Goffes house, 

The Garret studyes in M r Goffes house. 

The two lesser studyes over M r Shepheards chamber in 

the old Colledge 
The two highest studyes in the chamber over the kitchin 

valued at 7 



2 3 6 d by the quar. 



1 On this page are some figures written in pencil. 

2 This leaf is only about three-quarters the length of the ordinary pages in 
College Book I and is pasted in a little below the line of the adjacent leaves. 
The paper of this leaf is the same as the other paper in College Book I, but 
perhaps the leaf is not in its proper place. It is badly torn at the top. The en- 
tries are in the hand of President Chauncy. 

3 At the left of the page is written in pencil "gr. 1656." 

4 At the left of the page is written in pencil "gr. 1649;" and at the right of 
the page is written in pencil "Thos. Oakes gr. 1662." 

6 At the right of the page is written in pencil " Sam. Hooker gr. 1653." 

6 At the right of the page is written in pencil "Thos. Shephard gr. 1653." 

7 Beneath this entry Thaddeus William Harris has written in pencil, "The 
date of this must have been between 1652 & 1656, probably as early as 1652. 
T W H." John Langdon Sibley has written in pencil, "President Chauncys 
writing J LS." 



20 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



[32 1 

[33] 



The Magistrates of the Colony of Plimouth 1672 



M r Tho Prince at 
John Alden at 
Tho 8 Hinkly 

Bradforth 
ffreeman 



Plimouth. 

Duxborough 

Barnstable 

Plimouth 

Eastham 



Constant South worth treas r Duxborough 
] o Winslow Marsfeild 

Bacon in Barnstable 



Townes of s d Colony 

Scituate \ 

Marshfeild 

Duxborough 

Plimouth 

Barnstable 

Yarmouth 

Rehoboth 

Bridgwater 

Taunton 

Eastham 



The Ministers 1672. 

Baker 

Witherell. 

Arnold 

Homes 

Cotton 

Walley 

Thornton 

Newman 

Kythe 

Shove 

Treat 



[34] 

Benefactors to the first ffont of Letters for printing in Cambridge. 

Their names collected pLH 1674. 

Major Thomas Clark. 
Capt. James Oliver. 
Capt Allen. 



1 Page [32] is blank. 

2 The entries on pages [33-34] of the text are in the hand of President 
Hoar. 



WILLIAM TYNG's ACCOUNT, 1644 21 



Capt 


Lake. 


M r 


Stoddard. 




ffreake. 




Hues. 



[35] 

M r Ting y e Treasurer for y e Country given in y e following accout 1 

Month 3 d 16 da y 
1644. 

The Country debtor to y e Cott. for M r Harvards estate lent to it : . . 175-03-0 
Item for insufficient pay made to M r Sam : Shepheard w c hee abates 

yeCoIIedge 11-08-09 

Ite. for w* ever is due to y e Coll. of y* w c was sent by M r Weld 

& M r Peeter 

Ite by y e Countries gift by court act held at Boston. 8 th of y e 7. 

1636. 2 See register, pag. 131 3 400-0-00 4 



The country hath payd y e Cottedge as followeth. 
1639. To M r Eaton & M r Sam. Shepheard by M r Bellingha treasurer. 

of Cambr. rate 20-00-00 

ToM r S: Shep: of watertown rate 30-12-00 

1fi4l I To Mr Sne P heard fr ° Edmund Angier of Cambr. rate .... 40-00-00 

Mrandu. y* of this 90 a 12-00 Mr Sam. Sh: abates ye Cott:l 

1 1^-08-9. for insufficiency of pay so y* y e Coff: hath?- 

but received by his accout fro y e Country 79-3-3. J 

1642 Henry Dunster received 9 H of w c 12M3 d for printing y e laws. 

for y e Colledge received . . 08-07-06 

Item of Cambr: rate first and last H. Dunster received . . 62-12-06 
Ite of y* w c was sent from England by M r Weld & M r Peter 
H. D. received fro M r Sedgewick 40 H fro M r Stoughton 

16 a from y m both of this 56-00-00 

Item y e Country hath payd to Mr Allin of Hingham for 4000 of 

Boards 10-00-00 5 



1 The entries on page [35] of the text are in the hand of CC. 

2 The true date was October 28, not September 8, 1636. See Massachusetts 
Colony Records, i. 183. 

3 This reference cannot be identified. 

4 Some figures, evidently written later in a different hand, are here erased. 
6 Some figures, evidently written later in a different hand, are here erased. 



22 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[36 1 ] 
[37] 

v. p. 42, 43, 4 2 

Decemb. 10 th 1646. 3 

I wholy & fully resigne, grant, sell & make over all that farme of 
600. Acres given mee by y e Generall Court lying neere 4 Andevir by 
Merimacke, to y e Colledge at Cambridge for ever, 

By mee Natfc. Ward. 
Acknowledged the day 
& yeare above said before mee 

John Winthrop Gover r 
Recorded y e 22(2) 1647. by William Aspinall, V: Recorder. 

A Copy of M r Israel Stoughtons Legacy to Harvard Colledge 5 

Hereby I doe further give as followeth, Unto Harvard Colledge in 
Cambridge, I doe give Two hundred acres of Land out of my pur- 
chased Lands on the Northeast Side of Naponset, about Mother 
Brookes that is on the utmost bounds of my fTarm next to Dorchester 
Town all my grants & purchases on that side being laid together to 
my ffarme, as the Town hath alwayes pmised mee. So some meadow 
and some upland about Mother Brookes, may in time be something 
worth towards the advance of Learning, & one hundred acres more I 
give to the same use out of my dues on the Blew Hill side pvided the 
Towne will allow it to lye in due opposition to the former Two hun- 
dred, that the River onely may pt them; that is three hundred acres 
to the use aforesaid, to remayne to the Colledge use forever. The 
Court to choose one man, and my executo r s another and they Two 
a third to lay this out so as it may be most Equal for the good of the 
Colledg & w th least prejudice to my other Land 

by: William Aspinall Recorder. 

1 Page [36] is blank. 

2 These references, in an unknown hand, are to pages [68-70] of the text, or 
pages 52-55 of this volume. 

3 This entry is in the hand of DD. 

4 A word or letter is here crossed out. 
6 This entry is in the hand of EE. 






FOKMS OF CEKTIFICATES 23 

[38 1 ] 

[39 2 ] 

Per integrum Biennium, quo apud Nos pupillari statu commoratus 
est A. B. Collegij Harvardini Cantabrigiae in Nov-Anglia 3 Alumnus, 
Publicas Lectiones, tarn Philologicas, quam Philosophicas audivit; 
nee non Declamationibus, Disputationibus, cadterisque Exercitijs, pro 
sui temporis ratione adeo incubuit, ut Nobis certam spem fecerit, 
ilium suis coaetaneis, etiam in alijs Collegijs (si admissus fuerit) non 
disparem fore. Quapropter hoc de illo Testimonium omnibus quorum 
interesse possit perhibemus Nos quorum Nomina subscripta sunt. 

Datum. 

Per integrum illud tempus, quo apud Nos commoratus est C. D. 
Collegij Harvardini Cantabrigiae in Nova-Anglia Alumnus, et in 
Artibus Liberalibus Baccalaureus, bonarum Literarum studijs vitae 
probitatem adjunxit; adeo ut Nobis spem amplam fecerit se in 
Ecclesiae, & Reipublicae commodum victurum. Quapropter hoc de 
illo Testimonium omnibus quorum interesse possit perhibemus Nos 
quorum Nomina subscripta sunt. 

Datum. 

Per integrum illud Tempus, quo apud Nos commoratus est E. ff. 
Collegij Harvardini Cantabrigiae in Nova-Anglia Alumnus, & in 
Artibus liberalibus Magister, bonarum Literarum studijs sedulo 
incubuit; sinceram verse fidei professionem inculpatis suae vitae 
moribus exornavit; adeo ut Nobis certam, et amplam spem fecerit 
se in Ecclesiae, & Reipublicae commodum victurum. Quapropter hoc 
de illo Testimonium omnibus quorum interesse possit perhibemus 
Nos, quorum Nomina subscripta sunt. 

Datum. 



1 Page [38] is blank. 

2 The entries on page [39] of the text are in the hand of FF. 

3 Altered from i ' Nova-Anglia . ' ' 

4 Page [40] is blank. 



24 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[41] 

Jan. 1 13 th 164f Wheras Major Robert Sedgewick hath given to y e 
Coltedge for Ever a shop in Boston standing by y e great ordinary in 
the now possession of Richard Taylor tenant for fifteen years fro 
y e 26 fc of March 1646. & five years mor[e] added by Henry Dunster 
p r sident of Harvard Coliedge if y e Sayd Richard shal so long Hue 
These p r sents witness y fc y e sd Richard accordeth to give ten shillings 
y e year at two equall payments one on y e 25 th of march or w th in ten 
dayes therof the other on y e 13 th of September or w th in ten dayes 
therof & y* hee y e sd Rich, will leaue in good & sufficient repair y e sd 
house w th w fc soever addons hee shal make therto at y e end of his 
terme unto Harvard Coll. y e p r sident & fellowes therof witness his 
hand herto subscribed y e day & year aboue sayd. 

Richard Taylor. 2 

[42'] 

[43] 

the Lawes 4 Liberties & orders of Harvard Colledge 5 con- 
firmed by the Overseers & 6 president of ^ Col- 
ledge in the Yeares 1642, 1643, 1644, 1645, 
see b. P . 3 197 & 1646. an d published to ye Scholars 
for ye perpetuall preservation of 
their welfare & governement 

See y e same B. 3. p. 19 &c 8 

1. When any Schollar is able to Read Tully or such like classicall 
Latine Authour ex tempore, & make and speake true Latin in verse 
and prose suo (ut aiunt) Marte, and decline perfectly the paradigmes 



1 This entry is in the hand of GG. 

2 This name is apparently an autograph signature. Under it is written in 
pencil "Richard Taylor." 

8 Page [42] is blank. 

* These " Lawes Liberties & orders " are in the hand of HH. 

8 Two or three words are here crossed out. 

A word is here crossed out. 

7 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Wadsworth. The reference 
is to page [19] of College Book III, on page 187 of this volume. 

8 These words are in the hand of President Wadsworth. The reference is to 
page [19] of College Book III, or page 187 of this volume. 






COLLEGE LAWS, 1642-1646 25 

of Nounes and verbes in y e Greeke toungue, then may hee bee ad- 
mitted into y e Colledge, nor shall any claime admission before such 
qualifications. 

2. Every one shall consider the mayne End of his life & studyes, 
to know God & Jesus Christ which is Eternall life Joh. 17. 3. 

3. Seeing y e Lord giveth wisdome, every one shall seriously by 
prayer in secret, seeke wisdome of him. prov. 2. 2, 3 &c. 

4. Every one shall so exercise himselfe in reading y e Scriptures 
twice a day that they bee ready to give an account of their proficiency 
theerein, 1 both in theoreticall observations of Language & Logicke, 
and in practicall & spirituall truthes as their tutour shall require ac- 
cording to their severall abilities respectively, seeing the Entrance of 
ye word giveth light &c psal. 119. 130. 

5. In the publike Church 2 assembly they shall carefully shunne 
all gestures that shew any contept or 3 neglect of Gods ordinances and 
bee ready to 4 give an account to their tutours of their profiting and 
to use ye helpes of Storing themselves with knowledge, as their tutours 
shall direct them. & all Sophisters & Bachellors (until themselves 
make common place shall publiquely repeate Sermons in y e Hall 
whenever they are called forth 5 

6. they shall eschew all prophanation of Gods holy name, attri- 
butes, word, ordinances, and times of worship, and study with Rever- 
ence & love carefully to reteine God & 6 his truth in their minds. 

7. they shall honour as their parents, Magistrates, Elders, tutours 
& aged persons, by beeing silent in their presence (except they bee 
called on to answer) not gainesaying, shewing all those laudable ex- 
pressions of honour & Reverence in their presence, that are in use 
as bowing before them 7 standing uncovered or ye like. 

8. they shall bee slow to speake, & eschew not onely oathes, Lies, 
& uncertaine Rumours, but likewise all Idle, foolish, bitter scoffing, 
frothy wanton words & offensive gestures. 



1 The second "e" is interlined. 

2 The word "Church" is interlined. 

3 The words " contept or " are interlined, "or " being in a different hand. 

4 A word is here crossed out. 

5 The words beginning "&all Sophisters " to the end of the sentence, though 
in the same hand, were apparently inserted later. 

6 A word, perhaps "in," is here crossed out. 

7 The words "bowing before them " are interlined. 



26 COLLEGE BOOK I 

9. None shall pragmatically intrude or intermeddle in other mens 
affaires. 

10. During their Residence, they shall studiously redeeme their 
time, observe ye generall houres appointed for all ye Scholars, & 
y e speciall hour for their owne Lecture, & then diligently attend ye 
Lectures ' without any disturbance by word or gesture : And if of 
any thing they doubt they shall inquire as 2 of their fellowes so 3 in 
case of non-resolution modestly of their tutours. 

11. None shall under any pretence whatsoever frequent the com- 
pany & society of such men as lead an ungirt & dissolute life. 

Neither shall any without licence of ye overseers of y e Colledge bee 
of the Artillery or traine-Band. 

Nor shall any without y e Licence of y e Overseers of y e Colledge, 
his tutours leave, or in his absence y e call of parents or Guardians goe 
out to another towne. 

12. No Scholar shall buy sell or exchange any thing to ye value 
of sixe-pence without ye allowance of his parents, guardians, or 
tutours. And whosoever is found to have sold or bought any such 
thing without acquainting their tutour or parents, shall forfeit ye 
value of ye Commodity, -besides- or 4 ye Restoring of it, according to 
ye discretion of y e president 

13. the Scholars shall never use their Mother-toungue except 
thap] in publike Exercises of oratory or such like, they bee called to 
make them in English 

14. If any Scholar beeing in health shall bee absent from prayer 
or Lectures, except in case of urgent necessity or by y e Leave of his 
tutour, hee shall bee liable to admonition (or such punishment as 
the president shall thinke meet) if hee offend above once a weeke. 

15. Every Scholar shall bee called by his Sirname onely till hee 
bee invested with his first degree; except hee bee fellow-commoner 
or 5 a Knights Eldest Sonne or of superiour Nobility. 



1 A letter is here crossed out. 

2 A later hand (probably that of President Quincy) has underscored and 
crossed out "as." 

3 The same hand has crossed out "so," underneath it has written "or," and 
underneath "or " has written "(See in Latin)." 

4 The word "or" is interlined. 

6 The words "fellow-commoner or " are interlined. 



COLLEGE ORDERS, MAY 6, 1650 27 

16. No Scholars 1 shall under any pretence of recreation or other 
cause what-ever (unlesse foreshewed & allowed by ye president or 
his tutour) bee absent from his studyes or appointed exercises above 
an houre at Morning-Bever, halfe an houre at af ternoone-Bever ; an 
houre and an halfe -a- at Dinner & so long at Supper. 

17. If any Scholar shall transgresse any of ye Lawes of God or 
the House out of perversnesse or apparant negligence, after twice 
admonition hee shall bee liable -iff if not adultus to correction, if 
Adultus his name shall bee given up to ye Overseers of ye Colledg[e] 
that he may be publikely dealt with -a- after ye desert of his [fau]\t but 
in [gros]ser offences such graduall proceeding shall not bee ex[pected], 

[44] 

18. Every Scholar that on proofe is found able to read ye originall 
of ye old & New testament into ye Latin toungue, and to Resolve 
them Logically withall beeing of honest life & conversation and at any 
publike act hath ye approbation of ye overseers, & Master of ye 
Colledge may bee invested with his first degree. 

19. Every Scholar that giveth up in writing a Synopsis or summa 
of Logicke, Naturall & morall Philosophy, Arithmeticke, Geometry; 
& Astronomy, & is ready to defend his theses or positions, withall 
Skilled in ye originals as aforesaid & still continues honest and stu- 
dious, at any publike act after triall hee shall bee capable of y e 2 d de- 
gree of Master of Arts. 

Orders agreed upon by y e Overseers at a meeting in 
Harvard Colledge, May: 6 th : 1650. 2 

No Schollar whatever w th out y e fore acquaintance & leave of 
y e President & his Tutor, or in y e absence of either of them two of 
y e Sonio r ffellowes shal bee present at or in any of y e Publike Civil 
meetings or Concourse of people as Courts of justice, elections, fayres, 
or 3 at military exercise in y e time or howers of y e Colledge exercise 
Publike or private neither shal any schollar exercise himself in any 
Military band, unlesse of knowne gravity & of approoved, sober & 
vertuous conversation & y* w th leave of y e President & his Tutor. 

1 The letter t'r" in this word is interlined. 

2 These " Orders " are in the hand of II. 

3 Written over a word crossed out. 



28 COLLEGE BOOK I 

No schollar shall take Tobacco unlesse permitted by y e President 
w th ye Consent of their parents or guardians, & on good reason first 
given by a Physitian & then in a sober & private manner. 

To y e Intent y* no schollar may mispend his time, to y e dishonour 
of God & the society or y e greif & disappointment of his freinds, but 
y* that y e yearly progresse & sufficiency of Scollars may bee manifest : 
Its therefore order 'd: that hence forth there shall bee three weeks of 
visitation yearly foresignifyed publikely by y e President of y e Col- 
ledge between y e tenth of June & the Commencement wherein from 
9 of y e Clock to 1 1 in y e f orenoone & from one to 3 in the afternoon 
of y e second & third day of y e week all x scholars [t]wo years standing 
& upward shall 2 sit in y e Hall to bee examined by all Commers in 
y e Latine, Greek & Hebrew tongues & in Rhetoricke, Logike & 
Physicks. & they that -th- expect to proceed Batchelours that year to 
bee examined of their sufficiency according to y e Lawes of y e Colledge. 
& such that expect to proceed masters of Art to exhibit their Synopses 3 
of Arts required by y e Lawes of y e Colledge. & in Case any of y e Soph- 
isters Questionists or Inceptors faill 4 in y e premises required at 
their hands according to their standings respectively or bee found 
insufficient for y eir time & standing in y e Judgment of any three of 
the visitors being overseers of y e Colledge they shall bee deferred to 
y e following Year but they that are approoved sufficient for their de- 
grees shall proceed ; & y e Sophisters publickly approoved shall have 
their names publikely set up in y e Hall 

Whereas 5 by experience wee have found it prejudicial to the pmot- 
ing of Learning & good manners in the Colledge to admit such yong 
Schollars who have been negligent in their studyes & disobedient 
to their masters in the Schools & so by an evill custome or habit be- 
come utterly unfit to improove for their owne pfit according to their 
freinds expectation the liberty of students in th e Colledge : It is there- 
fore ordered by the President & ffellows of Harvard Colledge that 
no Schollar whatsoever where these bee published shall thenceforth 
bee admitted from any such Schools unlesse having the Testimony 



1 Apparently altered from "shall." 

2 The words "[/]wo years standing & upward shall n are interlined. 

3 Apparently altered from "Synopsis." 

4 Apparently altered from "fall." 

5 This paragraph is in the hand of JJ. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1642-1646 29 

of the Master of the said School of his obedience & submission to 
all Godly School-discipline & of his studiousnes & diligence at least- 
wise for one quarter of a year last before his comeing thence, or in 
case of discontinuance from School then it is expected hee shall 
bring the testimony of his sober & studious conversation under the 
hand of a Magistrate, or Elder or two or three competent pious 
witnesses 

[45] 

Statuta, Leges, Privilegia & ordinationes per Inspectores & 
Prsesidem Collegij Harvardini constitute An. Chr. 1642, 
1643, 1644, 1645, 1646 et promulgate ad Scholarium 
Salutem & disciplinam perpetu6 conservandam. 1 

1. Cuicunqwe fuerit peritia legendi Ciceronem aut quern vis alium 
ejusmodi classicum authorem ex tempore, & congrue loquendi ac 
scribendi Latine facultas oratione tarn soluta quam ligata, suo, ut 
aiunt, Marte, & ad unguem inflectendi Grsecorum nominum ver- 
borumqwe paradigmata; Hie admissionem in Collegium jure potest 
expectare. Quicunqwe vero desti tutus fuerit hac peritia Admissionem 
sibi neutiquam vendicet. 

2. Considerato unusquisqwe ultimum finem vitse ac Studiorum, 
cognitionem nimirum Dei et Jesu Christi, quae est vita seterna. Joh. 
17. 3. 

3. Cum Deus Sapientiae sit largitor, privatis precibws Sapientiam 
ab eo singuli ardenter petunto. Prov. 2. 2, 3 &c 

4. In Sacris Scripturis legendis bis quotidie unusquisqwe se exer- 
ceto; quo paratus ac peritus sit rationem reddendi suorum pro- 
fectuum tarn in theoreticis philologicis observationibws, quam in 
spiritualibus practicis documentis quemadmodum tutores requirent 
pro suo cujusqwe captu, quum, Aditus verbi illuminat psal. 119. 130. 

5. In publico Sanctorum Ccetu omnes gestus qui Contemptum 
aut Neglectum prse se ferunt Sacrarum Institutionum studiose 
cavento; atque ad Rationem tutoribus reddendam quid profecerint 
parati sunto; omnibusqi/e legitimis sibi scientiam reponendi medijs 
utuntor, prout a suo quisqwe tutore institutus fuerit. 



1 These " Statuta, Leges," etc., are in the hand of KK. 



30 COLLEGE BOOK I 

6. Oranem profanationem Sacrosancti Dei Nominis, Attributorum, 
Verbi, Institutionum ac temporum Cultus evitanto; Deum autem 
& ejus veritatem in notitia retinere summa cum Reverentia & timore 
student[o.] 

7. Honore prosequuntor ut parentes ita magistratus, presbyteros, 
tutorfcs] suosq?^ omnes seniores prout Ratio postulat; coram illis 
tacentes nisi interrogate, nee quicquam contradicentes, eis exhibentes 
honoris et reverential indicia qusecunque laudabili usu recepta sunt, 
in curvato nimirum corpore salutantes, aperto capite ■ adstantes &c. 

8. Ad Loquendum tardi sunto; Evitent 2 non solum juramenta, 
mendacia, & incertos Rumores, sed et stultiloquium, scurrilitatem 
futilitatem, lasciviam, omnesqi^ gestus molestos 

9. Nequis Se intrudat vel Rebus alienis immisceat. 

10. Dum hie egerint tempus studiose redimunto; tarn Communes 
omni[wra] Scholarium horas quam suis prselectionibus destinatas, 
observando: prselectionibus autem diligenter attendunto nee voce 
nee gestu molesti. Siquid dubitent sodales suos, aut (nondum ex- 
empto scrupulo) tutores modeste consulunto. 

11. Nequis sub quovis preetextu hominum quorum perditi sunt 
ac discincti more[s,] consuetudine seu familiaritate utitor. 

Neque licebit ulli, nisi potestate 3 ab Inspectoribus Collegij facta, 
bellicis lustrationibus interesse. 

Nemo in pupillari statu degens nisi concessa prius a tutore venia, 
e [ x ] oppido exeat; nee quisquam cujuscunqwe gradus aut ordinis 
fuerit forum frequentet, vel diutius in aliqua oppidi platea moretur 
aut tabernfas] cauponas vel diversoria ad comessandum aut biben- 
dum accedat, nisi ad parentes, curatores, nutricios vel hujusmodi 
accersitus fuerit. 

12. Nullus Scholaris quicquam quod Sex denarios valeat nullo 
parentum Curatorum, aut tutorum approbante emito vendito aut 
commutato. Qu[?'] autem secus fecerit a Praeside pro delicti ratione 
multabitur. 

13. Scholares vernacula lingua intra Collegij limites nullo praetextu 
ut[?^//]tor, nisi ad orationem -ad- aut aliud aliquod exercitium publicum 
a[/?</]lice habendum evocati fuerint. 



1 Apparently altered from "capito." 

8 A letter is here crossed out. 

8 Apparently altered from "potestati.' 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1642-1646 31 

14. Siquis Scholarium a precibus aut prselectionibus abfuerit nisi 
necessitate coactus aut tutoris nactus veniam, admonitioni aut alius- 
modi pro prsesidis prudentia pcense, si plus quam semel in Hebdo- 
made peccaverip] erit obnoxius. 

15. Scholarium quisqwe donee primo gradu ornetur, ni sit commen- 
salis, aut 1 Nobilis alicuju[V] filius, aut militis primogenitus, suo 
tantum cognomine vocator. 

16. Nullus Scholaris quavis de Causa (nisi prsemonstrata & appro- 
bate prsesidp] vel tutori suo) a suis studijs statisve exercitijs abesto, 
excepta Hora Jentaculo, Semihora Merendse, prandio vero sesquihora 
pariter & Cce[nce] concessa. 

17. Siquis Scholarium ullam Dei et hujus Collegij Legem sive 
animo pe[r]verso, seu ex supina negligentia violarit, postquam fuerit 
bis admonit[ws] si non adultus virgis coerceatur, sin adultus ad In- 
spectors Collegij deferendus erit ut publice in eum pro meritis 
animadversio fiat; in atrocioribus autem delictis ut adeo gradatim 
procedatur nemo expectet, nee ut admonitio iterata super eadem 
lege necessario fiat. 



[46] 

18. Quicunqwe Scholaris, probatione habita poterit Sacras utriusqwe 
Instrumenti Scripturas de textu originali latine interpretari & Logice 
resolvere, iueritque naturalis & moralis philosophise principijs im- 
butus, 2 vitaque ac moribus inculpatus, & publicis quibusvis Comitijs 
ab Inspectoribus & prseside Collegij approbatus, primo suo gradu 
possit ornari. 

19. Quicunqwe Scholaris 3 scriptam Synopsin vel Compendium 
Logicse, Naturalis ac moralis philosophise, Arithmeticse, Geometrise, 
& Astronomies? exhibuerit, iueritque ad theses suas defendendas 
paratus, nee non originalium ut supra dictum est Linguarum peritus, 
quern etiamnum morum integritas ac Studiorum Diligentia cohones- 
taverint, publicis quibusvis Comitijs probatione facta, secundi gradus 
Magisterij nimirum capax erit. 



1 The words " commensalis, aut " are interlined. 

2 A word is here crossed out. 

3 A letter was written between "o " and " 1 " and then blotted out. 



32 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[ 47-48 » ] 

[492] 

Certain Orders by the Schollars & officers of the Colledge 
to bee observed, written 28 March 1650 

The Steward receiving a just & clear account of the Visible stock 
or Treasury of the Colledge as it is a society either in Visible p visions 
or in debts acknowledged or prooved due by the members of the 
Society shall be bound w th sufficient security quarterly to give an 
account thereof w th in ten dayes to the President when hee shall 
require it, together w th the just & necessary disbursements, w ch by 
the Presidents allowance have been issued out (for necessary pvisions) 
to the Steward himself e, Butler, Cook, or any other officers of the 
house, as also to & for the necessary provisions of fuell, reparations 
of outworn utensils &c, towards all w ch Charges, the steward is to see 
(besides the stock maintayned) that one third pt bee reserved of all 
payments to him by the members of the house quarterly made, & the 
other two parts in sutable pvisions to the Schollars to bee returned as 
the season & state of the year doth require, & answerably hereto shall 
deliver in such provisions to the Cook & Butler, or Brewer & Baker, 
& of them require weekly & Quarterly accounts : 

fforasmuch as the students whose freinds are most careful to dis- 
charge their due expences, have sundry times sorely & unjustly 
suffered by such as neglect to pay their debts ; therefore the steward 
shal not pmit but upon his owne peril, any students to bee above Two 
pounds indebted, but acquainting the President, w th his leave send 
them to their freinds, if not above a dayes journey distant If other- 
wise then shall the steward at the Admission of such Schollars, enforme 
himself from whom hee shall bee supplied or to whom they shal have 
recourse in the aforesaid Case of Debt ; Neither is the Steward at any 
time to take any pay that is uselesse, hazardful, or importing detri- 
ment to the Colledge, as lean Cattle to feed turning over of Bills to 
shops &c but at his owne discretion & perill 

Whereas yongue Schollars to the dishono r of God hinderance of 
their studies & damage of their freinds estate, inconsiderately & 



1 Pages [47-48] are blank. 

3 The entries on pages [49-50] of the text are in the hand of LL. 



COLLEGE ORDERS, MARCH 28, 1650 33 

intemperately are ready to abuse their liberty of Sizing, besides their 
Commons; therefore 

The Steward shal in no Case pmit any Students whatever under the 
degree of Masters of Art, or ffellows to expend or bee provided for 
themselves or any Townsmen any extraordinary Commons unlesse 
by the Allowance of the President or Two of the fellows whereof 
their Tutor alwayes to bee one, or in Case of manifest sicknesse 
prsesignifyed also unto the president or in case of a licence of Course 
granted by the President to some persons, whose condition hee 
seeth justly requiring it 

The Butler & Cook are to look * unto & in Case detriment befal 
fully to bee accountable for all the Colledges vessels & utensils great 
& smal delivered by Inventory unto them & once every Quarter to 
deliver in unto the President in writing an Inventory thereof, particu- 
larly shewing what detriment is befallen the Colledge, in what par- 
ticular & by what means, whether by wearth in their just usage (w ch 
the Steward is to repair by the Colledge charges) or by any abuse of 
any person or persons whatever, from whom the President shall see 
that the Butler & Cook shall have just & full recompence if they bee 
members of the Society but if Detriment come by any out of the 
Society then those officers themselves shall bee responsible to the 
house; because they may not but at their peril communicate any 
thing that is the Colledges to any w th out 

Item they are to see that the said utensils to their several offices 
belonging from day to day bee kept clean & sweet & fit for use & 
they shall at meal times deliver them out as the Publike service of 
the Hall requireth to the servito r or servito rs who shall bee responsible 
for them until that they return them after meales to the Butteryes or 2 
Kitchin ; but they are not bound to keep or dense any pticular Scholar's 
Spoones Cups or such like, but at their owne discretion, at a 

[50] 

And if any Schollar or Schollars at any time take away or detain 
any vessel of the Colledges great or smal from the Hal out of the 



1 The words "are to look " are interlined. After "look," a word has been 
crossed out. 

2 Altered from "of." 



34 COLLEGE BOOK I 

doores from the sight of the Buttery hatch w th out the Butler's or 
Servito re knowledge or against their will hee or they shall bee punished 
threepence but more at the Presidents discretion if perversnes appear. 
But if hee or they shall presume to detain any vessel great or smal, 
that it bee wanting the next meal, hee shal bee punished the ful Value 
thereof & in case any shall loose marr, or spoyle any such Vessels, 
then shal they pay double thereof, & if they conceal it untill by ex- 
amination it bee found out fourfold the value thereof 

The Butler & Cook shal see that all the Roomes peculiar to their 
offices, together w th their appurtenances bee daily set & kept in order, 
clean & sweet from all manner of noysomnes & nastines who or 
sensibleftes- ofTensivenes ; to the Butler belongs the Cellar & butteries 
& all from thenceforth to the furthest end of the Hall w th the South 
Porch to the Cook the Kitchin, Larder, the way leader to the Hatch 
door the Turret & the North Alley unto the walk neither shall the 
Butler or Cook suffer any Schollar or Schollars whatever except the 
ffellows, Masters of Art, ffellow Commoners or Officers of the house 
to come into the Butteryes or Kitchin save w th their Parents or Guard- 
ians, or w th some grave & sober strangers, And if any shall presume 
to thrust in they shall have threepence on their heads But if presump- 
tuously & continually they shall so dare to offend, they shall bee lyable 
to an admonition & to other proceedings of the Colledge Discipline 
at the Discretion of the President 

The Butler upon every Sixt day of the week at noon is to give an 
account to every Schollar demanding his weeks sizings in the Buttery 
& is not bound to stay above half an hour at Bevers in the Buttery 
after the Tolling of the Bell, Nor above a Quarter of an hour after 
Thanksgiving in the Hall at Meals, The Cook on the Sixt day at 
Noon shall give in the weeks expenses of the whole society. w ch the 
Butler shall enter into his Book, according to Custome & shal keep 
the Bills from Quarter to Quarter and shew them to the Steward at 
his demand for his satisfaction 

The Butler & Cook may not deliver at meal-times save in Case of 
Sicknesse or just Causes to the President (if it may bee) presignifyed 
& by him allowed, any Commons to any Schollars, save unto the ser- 
vito r , Nor hee to any save their dues to the Schollars sitting orderly 
in their places, in the Hall, neither may any Schollar rise from his 
place or goe out of the Hall at Meal-times before thanksgiving bee 



FORMS FOR CONFERRING DEGREES 35 

ended, unlesse liberty bee given by the 1 President if present, or by 
the Senio r fellow or such as for that time possesse their place. 

If any officer of the Colledge whatsoever shall make any secret 
Contract w th any Scholar or Scholars, either to conceal their disor- 
derly walking or to draw from them any valuable things, as books, 
wearing apparel Bedding or such like, by any direct, or indirect 
Course, not before allowed by the President or their Tutor, The 
said officer or officers shall bee lyable to bee punished at the dis- 
cretion of the President. 

Whereas much inconvenience falleth out by the Schollars bring- 
ing Candle in Coarse into the Hall therefore the Butler henceforth 
shall receive at the Prsefidents or Stewards hands, Twenty shillings 
in money, ten at the Thirteenth of September, and ten at the Thir- 
teenth of December to pvide Candles for the Hall, for prayer time & 
supper, w c that it may not bee burthensome it shall bee put propor- 
tionably upon every scholar who retayneth his head in the Butteryes. 

[51] 

Prsesentatio Baccalaureorum. 2 

Honorandi viri vosque Reverendi Presbyteri praesento vobis hosce 
Juvenes quos scio tarn Doctrina quam moribus idoneos esse ad 
primum in Artibus gradum suscipiendum pro more Academiarum in 
Anglia. 

Admissio, 

Admitto te ad primum gradum in Artibus scil. ad Respondendum 
Qusestioni pro more Academiarum in Anglia. 

-tibiq^ tibiqwe trado hunc librum una cum potestate publice 
prselegendi (in aliqua Artium quam profiteris) quotiescunqwe ad hoc 
munus evocatus fueris. 

Prsesentatio Magistrorum 3 

Honorandi Viri vosque Reverendi Prsesbiteri Prsesento vobis hosce 
viros, quos scio tarn doctrina quam moribus esse idoneos ad incipien- 
dum in Artibus pro more Academiarum in Anglia. 



1 A letter is here crossed out. 

2 This entry and the next entry are in the hand of MM. 

3 This entry and the next entry are in the hand of NN. 



36 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Admissio Inceptorum 

Admitto te ad secundum gradum in Artibus pro more Academiarum 
in Anglia. 

Tibiqz/c trado hunc librum una cum po testate publice profitendi 
ubicunqwe ad hoc munus publice evocatus fueris 

[52] 

Formula publicse confessionis. 1 

Ego. S. W. qui a cultu divino in Aula Collegij tarn matutino quam 
vespertino toties per aliquot menses abfui (in qua absentia monitis et 
alijs in me animadversionum gradibus non obstantibi^ hactenus iper- 
stiti) nunc culpam meam agnosco, et publicse agnitionis hoc Testi- 
monio me reum profiteor, et majorem in his exercitijs pietatis 
diligentiam in posterum (Deo volente) dum hie egero, polliceor. 

[53] 

Socijs admittendis 2 

1 Prsebebis omnimodam debitam reverentiam Honorandis Magis- 
tratibus ac Reverendis Presbyteris & prsesidi, Collegij 3 Inspectoribus. 

2 Religiose in te suscipies curam dum hie 4 comraoraberis obser- 
vandi singulas salutares Leges, Statuta & privilegia hujus Societatis, 
quantum in te situm est ; atque etiam ut observentur -ah- ab omnibus 
hujus Collegij membris in singulo uniuscujusqwe munere. 

3 Omnes & singulos Studentes qui tutelae tuse committuntur, aut 
in posterum commitendi sunt, ut promoveas in omni tarn Divina 
quam Humana Literatura, pro suo cujusqwe captu, atque ut moribus 
honeste ac inculpate se gerant, summopere curabis. 

4 Sedulo prospicies nequid detrimenti Collegium capiat, quantum 
in te situm est, sive in ejus sumptibus, sive in aedificio, 5 structura, 
ffundis, proventibus, caeterisqwc omnibus quse nunc ad Collegium perti- 
nent aut dum hie egeris pertinere possint. 



1 This entry is in the hand of President Chauncy. 
-' Tliis entry is in the hand of 00. 

3 A word is here crossed out. 

4 A word is here crossed out. 

5 A letter is here crossed out. 



FORMS OF ADMISSION 37 

Quod etiam ad nos (Collegij Inspectores) spectat, po J! n 

nos tibi non defuturos esse, quibuscunqwe tua intererit: Imo vero 
te confirmabimus authoritate ac potestate nostra in omnibus tuis 
legitimis administrationibws, contra quoscunqwe contumaces: 

Et pro Collegij facultatibus erogabimus tibi Idonea stipendia 
(i. e. pro modulo nostro 2 quae Sufficiant ad victum & amictum & 
Literaturam tuam promovendam. 

In scholaribus admittendis 3 

1. Prsebebis omnimodam debitam reverentiam honorandis magis- 
tratibus ac Reverendis presbyteris, et presidi Collegij, vna cum socijs 
singulis. 

2. Debitam diligentiam studijs incumbendo adhibebis, studijs 
inquam linguarura et artium 4 liberalium, obsequendo Tutori tuo, et 
salutaribus, ejus preceptis, quamdiu in statu pupillari versatur fueris 
in hoc collegio. 

3. Religiose in te suscipies curam, dura hie commoraberis, obser- 
vandi singulas salutares leges, statuta et privilegia huius societatis, 
quantura in te situra est: atqwe etiam ut observentur ab omnibus 
hujus Collegij membris in singulo uniuscujusqwe mun[ere] fideliter 
curabis. 

4. Sedulo prospicies, nequid detrimenti collegium, capiat, quantu?^ 
in te situra est, sive in ejus sumptibus, sive in sedificio et structura, 
fundis, proventibus fenestris 5 cseterisque omnibus, quse nunc ad 
Collegiura pertinent, aut dura hie egeris pertinere possunt. 

Quod ad nos, Prsesidem et socios scilicet, spectat, pollicemur nos 
tibi non defuturos, quibuscunqwe nostra intererit, imo vero in studijs 
tuis, et pietate 6 progressura, quantura in nobis fuerit promouebimus. 

forasmuch 7 as the wearing of long haire after the manner of Ruffians 



1 The word "pollicemur" has been underscored and above it written, ap- 
parently in a different hand, "pollicentur se." 

2 The words "(i. e. pro modulo nostro " are interlined in the same hand in 
which "pollicentur se" is written. 

3 This entry is in the hand of President Chauncy. 

4 A letter is here crossed out. 

5 The word "fenestris" is interlined. 

6 The words "et pietate " are interlined. 

7 This entry is in the hand of H. 



38 COLLEGE BOOK I 

and barbarous Indians, hath begun to invade new England contrary 
to the rule of Gods word w c sayth it is a shame for a man to wear long 
hair, as also the Commendable Custome generally of all the Godly of 
our nation until w th in this few yeares Wee the Magistrates who have 
subscribed this paper (for the clearing of o r owne innocency in this 
behalfe) doe declare & manifest o r dislike & detestation against the 
wearing of such long haire, as against a thing uncivil and unmanly 
whereby men doe deforme themselves, and offend sober & modest 
men, & doe corrupt good manners. Wee doe therefore earnestly 
entreat all the Elders of this Jurisdiction (as often as they shall see 
cause) to manifest their zeal against it, in their Publike administra- 
tions, and to take Care that the members of their respective Churches 
bee not defiled therew th , that so such as shall proove obstinate & will 
not reforme themselves may have god & man to bear witnes against 
them 

The third Month. 10. day 1649 

Jo : Endicott Gov* 
Thomas fflint Tho Dudley Dep Dep Gov r 
Rofo: Bridges Rich Bellingham 
Simon Bradstreet Richard Saltonstall 
Increase Nowell 



William Hibbins 



[54 1 ] 



[55 2 ] 

desunt plurimse 3 

August y e 1 st 71. 

This day at a corporation meeting wee received of y® Treasurer, 
this coppy of M r Penoyers Will. 

A Clause of M r Wili m Penoyers Will, bearing date 20 th May. 1670. 

And for and Concerning my messuage 4 in Norfolke let unto Rot) 1 

Moor at y e yearly rent of ffourty four pound p annum : My Will is 



i Page [54] is blank. 

2 The entries on page [55] of the text are in the hand of Treasurer Richards. 

s With "plurimse" supply "paginae" (understood). 

* The letter "u" in this word is interlined. 



WILLS AND BEQUESTS 39 

y* out of y e rents & profits thereof Ten pounds p annum shall be payd 
for ever to y e Corporation for y e propogation of y e Gospel in New 
Engl d & y* w th y e residue thereof two fellowes & two schollars for 
ever shall be educated maintained & brought up in ye Colledge called 
Cambridge Colledge in New England of wch I desire one of y 111 so 
often as occasion shall present may be of y e Loyne or Posterity of y e 
s d Rofo rt Penoyer if they be capeable of it, & y e other y e Colony of 
Nox or of late called New-Haven Colony if conveniently may be; & 
I declare my minde to be y* eight yeares or thereabout is a convenient 
tyme for education of each scholar] respectively, & about y* stand- 
ing others to be taken into their places, w ch neverthelesse as to him 
I leave to y e Master & Governo 1 * of y e s d Colledge. 
This to be performed after ye death of my wife Martha Penoyer 

Octob. 8 th 79 1 
A clause in y e will of S r Matthew Holworthy 

Item : I give, and bequeath unto y e Colledg, or University, in, or 
of Cambridg, in New-England, the summe of one thousand pounds, to 
bee payd, and made over, to the governours, and directors there of, 
to bee disposed of, by them, as they shall judg best for y e promoting 
of learning, and promulgation of y e Gospell in those parts, the same 
to bee payd, within two 2 years, next coming after my decease 

hee dyed in October 78 3 and left m r Henly and his lady executors. 

[56*] 

[57] 

A Clause of M r Rogers's Wil 5 

And in Case the Chh or 6 Town of Rowley doe fail of the Condition 
of providing themselves of two teaching Elders according to the time 



1 The figure "79 " is underscored. 

2 Substituted for a word crossed out. 

3 The figure "78 " is underscored. 

4 Page [56] is blank. 

5 This entry is in the hand of PP. 

6 The words "Chh or " are interlined. 



40 COLLEGE BOOK I 

prefixed that is within four Years after they have this to Enable them 
the better & so from time to time within the said Term of four Years 
after God by His Providence Have made any Change my Wil is that 
the abovesaid Housing and Lands shal be to the Use of Harvard 
Colledg at Cambridge in New-England &c. 

[58*] 

[59] 

Maij 31 mo 1650. 2 

Whereas through the good hand of God, many wel devop]ed 
psons have been & daily are mooved & stirred up to give & bestow 
sundry, [#]ifts, Legacyes, Lands & revenues for the Advancement of 
all good [Literature, Arts, & Sciences in Harvard Colledge in Cam- 
bridge [i]n the County of Middlesex, & to the maintainance of the 
President, & ffellowes, & for all accommodations of buildings, & all 
other necessary provisions that may conduce to the Education of the 
English, & Indian Youth of this Country in knowledge & Godlines 

It is therefore Ordered & Enacted by this Court & the Authority 
thereof, that for the furthering of so good a work & for the purposes 
aforesaid, ffrom henceforth that the said Colledge in Cambridge in 
Middlesex in New-England shall bee a Corporation consisting of 
seaven persons (to wit) a President five fellowes & a Treasurer or 
Burser, and that Henry Dunster shall bee the first President, Samuel 
Mather, Samuel Danforth m re of Art, Jonathan Mitchel, Comfort 
Starr, and Samuel Eatton Batchelo 18 shall bee the five ffellowes, & 
Thomas Danforth to be present Treasurer; all of them being In- 
habitants in the Bay & shall bee the first seaven persons of wch the 
said Corporation shall consist; And that the said seaven persons or 
the greater Number of them procuring the presence of the Overseers 
of the Colledge and by their Counsel & Consent, shall have power 
& are hereby authorised at any time or times to elect a new Prsesident, 
ffellowes, or Treasurer, so oft & from time to time as any of the said 
pson or persons shall dye or bee remooved: w ch said Praesident & 
ffellowes for the time being, shall forever hereafter in name & fact 



1 Page [58] is blank. 

2 This entry is in the hand of QQ. 



COLLEGE CHARTER, 1650 41 

bee one body Politick & Corporation in Law to all intents & purposes, 
& shall have perpetuall succession & shall bee called by the name of 
President & ffellowes of Harvard Colledge, and shall from time to 
time bee eligible as aforesaid, & by that name they & their successo 1 ^ 
shall & may purchase & acquire to themselves; or take & receive 
upon free gift & donation, any lands, Tenements or Hereditament^] 
w th in this Jurisdiction of the Masachusets not exceeding the value 
of five hundred pounds p Annum, & any goods & summes of money 
whatsoever to the use & behoofe of the said President -fe-Seheltes* 
ffellowes & Schollars of the said Colledge, and also may sue & plead 
or bee sued & impleaded by the name aforesaid in all Courts & places 
of Judicature w th in the Jurisdiction aforesaid, & that the said Presi- 
dent w th any three of the fellowes, shall have power, & are hereby 
Authorized when they shall think fitt to make and appoint a Common 
seal for the use of the said Corporation, And the President or fellowes 
or the major pt of them from time to time may meet & choose such 
officers, & servants for the Colledge, & make such allowance to them, 
and them also to remoove, & after death or remooval to choose such 
others, & to make from time to time such orders, & By-lawes, for the 
better ordering & Carryeing on the work of the Colledge, as they 
shal think fitt, Provided the said Orders bee allowed by the Over- 
seers And also that the President, and ffellowes or Major part of them 
w th the Treasurer shall have power to make conclusive bargaines, 
for Lands & Tenements to bee 1 purchased by the said Corporation 
for valuable consideration, And for the better Ordering of the Gov- 
ernment of the said Colledge & Corporation bee it Enacted by the 
Authority aforesaid that the President & three more of the ffellowes, 
shall & may from time to time, upon due warning or notice given by 
the President to the rest hold a meeting for the debateing & conclud- 
ing affayres concerning the Profits & revenues of any Lands & dis- 
posing of their goods: Provided that all the said disposings bee 
according to the will of the Doners ; And for direction in all emergent 
Occasions, Execution of all Orders and By-lawes, & for the procuring 
of a Generall meeting of all the Overseers & society in great & diffi- 
cult Cases, And in Case of Non-agreement, in all w ch Cases aforesaid 
the Conclusion shall [be] made by the Major part, the said President 



1 Written over another word. 



42 COLLEGE BOOK I 

having a Casting voyce, the Overseers consenting thereunto: Verte. 
[ 60 ] And that all the aforesaid transactions shall tend to and for the 
use and Behoof ! of the President, ffellowes, Schollars & officers, of 
the said Colledge, & for all accommodations of buildings, books, & 
all other necessary provisions, & furnitures, as may bee for the Ad- 
vancement & Education of Youth in all manner of go[od] Literature, 
Arts & Sciences, And further bee it Ordered by thi[s] Court & the 
Authority thereof, That all the Lands, Tenements or Hereditaments, 
howses, or Revenues w th in this Jurisdiction to the aforesaid Presi- 
dent, or Colledge appertaining not exceeding the value of five hun- 
dred pounds per Annum shall from henceforth bee freed from all 
Civil impositions, Taxes & Rates, all Goods to the said Corporation, 2 
or to any Schollars thereof apptaining, shall bee exempt from all 
manner of Toll, Customes, excise whatsoever, And that the said 
President; ffellowes & schollars, together w th the servants & other 
necessary officers to the said President or Colledge appertaining not 
exceeding Tenn viz, three to the President & seaven to the Colledge 
belonging shall bee exempted from all psonall, Civil offices, military 
excercises, or services watchings & wardings & such of their Estates 
not exceeding one hundred pounds a man shall bee freed from all 
Country Taxes or Rates whatsoever, and no others 

Bv the Court Edward Rawson Secret: 
Verum Exemplar 

Out of the printed lawes in the title Colledge. 3 

Wheras through the good hand of God ther is a Colledge founded 
in Cambridge in the County of middlesex called Harvard Colledge, 
for incouragement whereof this Court hath give foure hundred 
pounds, & also the revenue of y e ferry, betweene Charlestowne & 
Boston, & that the well ordering & managing of y e said Colledge is 
of great concernement, [it] is therefore ordered by this Court & the 
authority thereof, that y e Gouern r & Deputy Gouern r for the time 
being, & all the magistrates of this jurisdiction together w th the 
teaching elders of the six next adjoyning townes, viz. Cambridge, 



1 Apparently altered from V Behoofe." 

3 Altered from "Corporations." 

3 This entry is in the hand of President Chauncy. 



FORM OP EXEMPTION FOR COLLEGE SERVANTS 43 

watertowne, Charlestowne, Boston, Roxebury, Dorchester & the 
President of y e said Colledge for the time being shall fro time to time 
haue full power & authority to make & establish all such orders 
statuts & constitutions, as they shall see necessary for the instituting, 
guiding & furthering of the said Colledge, & the severall members 
therof fro time to time, in piety, morality & learning, as also to dis- 
pose, order & manage to y e use & behoofe of the said Colledge & 
members thereof, all gifts, legacys, bequeaths, revenues, lands, & 
donations, as eyther haue bene, are or shalbee conferred, bestowed, 
or any ways shall fall or come to the said Colledge. & wheras it may 
come to passe that many of the magistrates & said Elders may bee 
absent or otherwise imployed in other waighty affaires, whe the 
said Colledge may need ther p r sent helpe & counsell. It is therefore 
ordere d that y e greater number of magistrates & elders y* shalbee 
p r sent w th y e p r sident shall haue power of the whole. Provided that 
if any constitution, order or orders by them made shalbee found 
hurtfull to y e said Colledge or y e members therof, or to y e weale 
publick, the upo appeale of the pty or ptys grieved, unto y e company 
of overseers first mentioned they shall repeale the said order or orders 
(if they see cause) at y r next meeting, or stand accountable therof 
to y e next generall Court. [1636. 1640. 1642.] x 

[61] 

The form of exemption for Colledge servants 2 

Whereas our much Honoured Magistrates & Deputyes in General 
Court assembled in y e third month of y e year one thousand six hun- 
dred & fifty have for y e furtherance of good literature by charter 
priviledged the officers & servants of Harvard Colledge to the number 
of Ten from all personal offices, civil & military exercises & services, 
watchings & wardings & their estates not exceeding a hundred pound 
a man from all Country rates & taxes whatever 

Wee therefore ABC having chosen our wel approoved neighbour 
D E to serve us for the space of one whole year in-b is calling from 
the date hereof in his calling of F to attend the Colledge work upon 



1 The square brackets are in the original. Underneath is written in pencil 
Chauncys handwriting." 
8 This entry is in the hand of RR. 



44 COLLEGE BOOK I 

a week or ten dayes warning so often as thereunto hee shal bee called 
doe by vertue of y e priviledges given unto us exempt y e aforesaid 
D E from all y e aforementioned incumbrances & charges, In wit- 
nesse whereof wee have given & hee hath -Exe- accepted these presents 
Signed w th our hands. 

At a meeting of the Corporaccon. June. 10 th 1659. 1 

Whereas there are great complayntes of the exorbitant practises 
of Some stud t3 of this Coll. by their abusive wordes and accons to 
the Watch 2 of this Towne. The Corporaccon accounting it their 
duty by all lawfull meanes to seeke the redress thereof for the future, 
do hereby declare to all persons whom it may conc r ne, That the 
Watch of this Town from time to time, and at all times shall have 
full pow r of inspeccon into the mann r s & orders of all persons related 
to the Coll, whether w th in or w th out the p r cincts of the said Coll. 
houses & lands, as by law they are impowred to act in cases wherein 
-they within the limitts of their Towne, any law, vsage, or costome to the 
contrary not withstanding. Provided alwayes we Judge it not con- 
venient, neither do we allow that any the said Watchmen should lay 
violent hands on any of the stud t3 , being found with in y e p r cincts of 
the Coll. yard, 3 otherwise 4 then so as they may secure them vntill they 
may informe the Presid* or some of the fellowes, neithefr] shall they 
in any case break into their Chambers or studjes, without speciall 
order from Presid* -&e- or fellowes, or some other supio r Authourity, 
but in all cases as need may require shall seasonably inform either 
the Presid* or some of the fellowes, who will take care to examine 
the matter, for the effectuall healing of all such disorders, Also in 
case any studenp] of this Coll, shalbe found absent from his lodging 
af te[r] nine of the clock at night, he shalbe responsible for & to ail 
complayntes of disorder in this kind, that by testimony of the Watch, 
or other, shall appe [ar] to be done by any stud 1 of the Coll, & shalbe 
adjudged guelty of the said Crime, vnless he can purge himself e by 
suffecient witnesse. 



1 The date " 1659 " is underscored. This entry is in the hand of Treasurer 
Danforth. 

2 Above this word is written in pencil "Watch." 

3 Perhaps "yards." 

« The letters "th" are written over other letters. 



DUTIES OF THE COLLEGE SERVANTS, 1667 45 

[62 1 ] 
[63 2 ] 
[Jra]primis. 3 

Henceforth the Steward, y e Butler, & y e Cooke shall in distinct 
bookes keep an exact account of their respective offices & trustes 
comitted to them, in way of debto r & Credito r , & shall present the 
same to y e Corporation at the presidents house from time to tyme, 
y e 6 th day come fortnight after y e end of every Quarter, by 9 of y e 
Clock in y e morning; & y* no person doe fayle to doe his duty, on 
penalty of being fined 20 s to the use of the Colledge; as allso to 
satisfy all Damage, y e Coft g shall sustaine by such their neglect. 

The steward shall take y e sole care of, & provide 4 at y e Currant 5 
price all necessary & meet provisions, w th utensels, for y e offices both 
of y e Cooke & Butler, according as y e Colledge occasions, whether 
ordinafr?/] or extraordinary, shall from tyme to time require, & sea- 
sonably deliver y e same to y e respective offices. — He shall keep an 
exact & true account of all such disbursments, & quarterly shall 
requir[e] & receive of y e Butler & Cook an account, of y e perticular 
Debto r s to y e Colledge, & shall present y e same so 6 received, together 
w th his owne, unto the President for his examination, & Approba- 
tion; y e w ch being passed by y e president, y e steward shall forthw th 
require ye same of y e severall Debto r s, & shall personally stand 
Engaged to respond, & pay y e same to y e Colledge. 

The steward shall deliver in, to y e Butler, his Bread at 5 s y e bushell, 
allowing to every Bushell 70 Loaves, ye weight of every Loafe being 



1 Page [62] is blank, except that a few letters and words have been scribbled, 
of which the only decipherable ones are — 

R 

Rules and Orders 

Rules 

R 

2 The entries on pages [63-64] of the text, down to and including the words 
" Thomas Danforth CI : " are in the hand of Treasurer Richards. 

3 The top of the page, including the heading, has been cut off. Some of the 
letters of the heading are visible, but are not decipherable. 

4 A letter is apparently here erased. 

6 The second "r " in this word is interlined. 
6 The word "so" is interlined. 



46 COLLEGE BOOK I 

proportionable to y e Current price of wheate, as in y e Country statute, 
for white-bread ; & shall deliver in his Beer, at 2 s the Barrell, each 
Barrell consisting of 16 Beer Gallons: allowing therunto a Peck of 
Mault. — The steward is from time, to tyme, to pay ^ Colledge 
officers, viz y e Tuto r s, Cook, Butler, & Bell-ringer, y r respective 
Dues and Sallaries ; & allso, to allow y e Monito r s Account. — The 
steward shall be accountable, & pay unto y e Treasurer Quarterly, 
w l shall be given in, in ye q r t r Bill, in y e Acc u of study-Rents & 
glasse-mending. He shall be allowed in his Acc tta , 5 h qurt r ly, for 
his salary. 

The Butler & Cooke are to Look unto, & in case Detriment befall, 
fully to be accountable, for all y e Coli : Vessells, & Vtensells, great 
& small, delivered by Inventory unto them, & on * every q r t r to de- 
liver in, unto ye Corpor 11 in writing, an Inventory thereof, perticu- 
larly shewing what detriment is befallen y e Coil: & by what meanes 
whether by Wearth, in y* just usage (w ch y e steward is to repaire at 
y e Coll : charge [,] or by any abuse of any person, & persons whoever, 
from whome y e Corpor 11 shall se y 1 y e Butler & Cooke, shall haue 
just & full recompence, if they be members of y e society: But if 
Detriment come by any out of y e society, then those Officers ^selves, 
shall be responsible to y e house, bee : they may not but at their perill, 
Comunicate w* is y e Colledg 8 to any w th out. 

The Butler and Cook, are to see y fc y e sayde Vtensells, to f severall 
offices belonging, from day to day, be kept cleane and sweet, & fit 
for use ; & they shall at meale-times, deliver them out, as y e publiqj 
service of y 6 Hall requires to y e Servito r or Servito r s, who shall be 
responsible for them, untill they return ym, after meales, to ye 
Buttery & Kitchin : But they are not bound, to Keep, or cleanse any 
perticular schollars spoons, cups, & similia; but at their owne de- 
scre[tion] If any schollar or schollars, at any time, take away, or 
detaine, any Vesseli of y e Coll : Great or small, from y e Hall, out of 
Doores, from y e sight of y e Butterf?/] Hatch, w th out the Buttlers or 
servito r s knowledge, or against their will ; he or they shall be punished 
3 d : but more, at ye Presidents or Fellowes descretion, if pervers- 
nesse appeare: but if he, or they, shall presume to detayne any 
Vesseli great or small, yt it be wanting y e next meale, he shall be 
punish [erf] 12 d — & in Case, any shall loose, marr, or spoyle, any such 

1 Altered from "one." 






DUTIES OF THE COLLEGE SERVANTS, 1667 47 

vessell y* shall they pay y e full value y r of ; & as y e matter may be 
Circumstanced, shall be allso lyable, to w* further punishmen* y e 
Corp : n shall Judge meet. 

The Butler, & Cooke, shall see y* all y e Rooms peculiar to their 
offices, together w th their appurtenances, be set & Kept in order, 
cleane, & sweet, from all manner of noysomeness, & nastinesse, & 
sensible offensiveness : 

To y e Butler belong y e Cellar, & Buttery, & all from thenceforth, 
to y e farthest end of y e Hall, w th y e south porch; To y e Cook, y e 
Kitchin, Larder, y[ e ] way Leading to his Hatch, ye Turret, & y e 
north-Ally to y e walke, 

Neither shall y e Butler or Cook, suffer any scholl 1 " or Scholl r s who- 
ever, Except y e fellowes, Marsters of Art, & Fellow-Comoners, or 
officers of y e house to Come into y e Buttery or Kitchin, saue w th y* 
parents or Guardians, or w tn some grave & sober strangers; & if 
any shall presume to thrust in, he shall be punished 3 d , but if pre- 
sumptuously, and continually y y shall so dare to offend, y y shall be 
lyable to an admonition, & to other proceeding of y e Coll : discipline, 
as y e Corporat u shall determine. 

[64] 

The Butler & Cooke, shall not deliver at meale-tymes, save in case 
of sickness, or other just & Allowable causes, any Comons to any 
schollars, saue unto y e servito r s, nor they to any, saue their dues, to 
y e schollars, siting orderly in y r places. 

Neither y e Cook, nor y e Butler, shall put any schollar into, or out 
of comons, but by order from y e President, or his Tuto r . 

The Cook receiving provisions 1 from y e steward, at Current price, 
shall deliv r y e same out, to y e schollars, advanceing an halfe penny 
upon a penny. 

The Cook, for ye faythfull discharge of his office, shall be allowed 
by Coll : 30 H per annum, & his Comons. 

The Butler, receiveing his Beer from y e steward, single beer at 2 s , 
& double at 4 s y e Barrell, shall advance 4 d upon y e shilling. 

The Buttler shall take a distinct Ace 1 , of y e comons, of y os schollars* 
yt are absent from meales, w ch shall be reserved for y e Coll: use. 



1 The word "provisions" is interlined. 



48 COLLEGE BOOK I 

The Butler upon every 6 th day at noon, shall give an Ace* to every 
schoir, demannding his weeks Sizeings in y e Buttery; & he is not 
bound, to stay aboue halfe an houre at break-fast in y e Buttery, after 
y e toleing of y e Bell ; nor above a q r t r of an houre after thanksgiving 
in y e Hall, at meales. 

The Butler shall provide Candles for y e Hall, both for prayer & 
supper, receiving for y* end fro y e steward, 20 s in silver, or y e Value 
thereof in Candles. 

The Buttler for y e faythfull dischargeing of his office, shall receive 
from y e Coll: 12 il g annum. 

The schollars of y e house shall take a strict ace* of all y e Buildings, 
Chambers, studyes, & fences, belonging to y e Coll: & shall give an 
Ace* qu r tly, to ye Treasurer, w* Damage y e Coll: hath sustained, in 
any of y e forementioned particulars, & by whome. 

No schollar shall enter into, or leave y e possession of any chamber, 
or study, untill some one of y e scholla r s of ye house, have veiwed ye 
state /of, w ch y y shall represent unto y e Treasur r ; and in case, any 
shall leave a 1 study in any chamber, v/in some doe yet remaine, 
such as remaine, shall stand charged, w th y e care of y e vacant studyes. 

The Bel-Ringers office is, to ring y e bell, (except for meales) to 
keep ye clock, & to call y e president to prayers; for w ch , he shall 
receive from y e steward, 5 h g Annu. 

At a Meeting of y e Over-seers, at y e Presidents house, 
March. 27 th . 1667. 

These ord r s abovesd, being read over, are confirmed, at y e untill 
y e Overseers shall see meet, to take y 111 into farth r consideration; 

as attests, — Thomas Danf orth Ci : 

June 17. 1667 2 

Ordered by y e Corporation y* y e batchellours shall have the fore- 
noon on y e comencement day for y e pformance of their work & y fc for 
y e future it shall bee looked upon as their due ordinarily; except 
there doe appear to the president & fellows any just reason moveing 
them to 3 order it otherwise. 



1 Substituted for "ye," crossed out. 
8 This entry is in the hand of SS. 
3 A letter is here crossed out. 






CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1669-1670 49 

[65 1 ] 

October, 4th, 1669. 

Ordered by the corporation, that m r Thomas Danforth be desired, 
& upon his consent engaged, to pay unto the Fellowes ye money due 
by charlestowne ferry, & to provide wood & other conveniences for 
them ; & alsoe, to give them a bill to m r Richards the Treasurer, of 
what is due to them of theif-^ea^ly- remainder of their 2 sallary, once 
a year. 

It is alsoe ordered, that three pounds be allowed by ye steward 3 to 
Goodman Taylor, towards ye discharge of ye charges of his sons 
comencement ; & yt ys money be repayed, either by ye money coming 
from ye east- ward (if it be attaineable) or else to be allowed out of 
m r Webs gifte, abating 15 shillings apeice from ye money aforesaid 
distributed among four persons. 

It is further ordered, yt ye revenues of m r Webs gift be distributed 
for ye followeing 4 year, as it was ye last yeare ; viz : yt yr be allowed, 
to S r Shepard four pounds: to Higginson three pounds: to Corlett 
three pounds : to Adames three pounds : & this money is to be allowed 
to ym by ye Steward, unlesse some part yrof be abated, as is provided 
in ye foregoing order. 

Item, it is ordered, yt Sewall be made a scholar of ye house; & 
succeed S r Eppes (provided yt he leave ye Colledge for ys winter) 
in his scholarship. 

Feb: 21, 



Ordered by ye Corporation, yt m r John Richards Treasurer, shall 
pay to Francis Willoughby Esqj ; for 28 pewter dishes ; which weighed ; 
102 11 

11 s 

3 pottle pots, at 6 s a peice, is 00-18- 

n s d 
&, one 3 pint pott 00-04-06. 

Item, to pay to m r Shrimpton, for sundry th s 02- 9- 



1 All the entries on page [65] of the text, except the last entry (dated Octo- 
ber 1, 1672), are in the hand of TT. 

2 The words "remainder of their " are interlined. 

3 The words "by ye steward " are interlined. 

4 Apparently originally written " followed," then the " d " crossed out. 



50 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Item, to ye president, towards S r Taylors comencemt . . 01-00- 
Item, to pay ye Steward, towards S r Taylors comencement 02- 0- 
Item, it is ordered, yt ye last 3 pounds be well repayed to ye Coll: 
stock, out of ye Eastward money. 

Sept: 27, 1670. 

Ordered by ye Corporation, y* ye revenues of m r Webs gift, be 
distributed for ye following year, as it was ye last year : except some 
of psons soe priviledged, doe become discontinues. 

Item, yt ye Butler shall * have four or 2 -& five pounds given to him, 
for ye year currant, to encourage him in his work, wch money is to be 
taken from some of ys sums of moneyes, wch are given to ye Colledge, 
for ye encouragement of poor scholars, alsoe, yt ye Corporation will 
speak to Overseers (ye next opportunity jy have,) for ye enlarging of 
his stipend. 3 

August, 1, 1671. 

Ordered by ye Corporation, that m r Richards ye Treasurer, pay 
unto Taylor ye Butler, five pounds in cash, out of ye Colledge Treas- 
ury ; wch said money, was formerly promised to ye said Butler, by ye 
Corporation, for ye faithfull discharge of his place. 

Novem: 15, 1671. 

Ordered by ye Corporation, that m r Webs gift, for ye year currant 
(viz: from August, 71, to Aug, 72) be distributed as followeth; to S r 
Shepard, four pounds; to S r Higginson, three pounds; to S r Corlett, 
three pounds ; to Emerson, three pounds : except some of ye persons 
soe priviledged, doe become discontinues. 

Febr: 12, 1671. 

Ordered by ye Corporation, That S r Thatcher & Alcocke continue 
scholars of ye house; & that Pyke & Allen be substituted in ye 
other two vacant places, 
linot served Item, That Minor be Monitor. 

Novr 15 1674. 

tifyed-P-LH.* ' The word "shall" is interlined. 

2 The word "or" is interlined. 

3 There is here written in pencil " J8^* observe p 41." The reference is to 
page [07] of the text, or page 51 of this volume. 

4 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Hoar. 



COLLEGE LANDS IN THE PEQUOT COUNTRY, 1670 51 

Item, That ye three pounds of m r Webbs Gift, allowed to S r Cor- 
lett for ye year currant, be given to Hawley ; & yt only one Quarters 
pay be * allowed to S r Corlett, by reason of his discontinuance. 

-Get- Octob r y e Is*. 1672.* 

Ordered by y e Corporation, y 1 M* Webs gift, for ye year currant Jannj 11 
(viz from August 72 to August 7[$1 be distributed as followeth ; to pard 1 year \ 

© . . mr Higginso ! 

M r Shepard four pounds ; to S r Higginson three pounds, to Haw[/e?/] f ebry a*, 
three pounds, & to Emerson three pounds, except some of y e persons 
so priviledged do become discontinuers : 

[66] 

Jan nj 25: 1672. 

M r Danforths acco* made up for the year past & the ballance due to 
him 40 h 09 s l d 1* ordered to be pd him by the Treasurer m r Richards 
v. Acco ts ffol i. Reliquas vide pagina hujis 49 4 

[67 6 ] 

Harvard Colledge in Cambridge Sept. 27, 1670: 

The Presid* & Fellowes being assembled, do order y e Treasurer 
of y e Colledge to lett out & dimise y e lands of y e Colled ge- belonging 
to y e Colledge within y e Pequot Country for such terme of years as 
he shall finde to be for y e best good & improovement of y e lands. 
Provided where any person or persons have violently intruded & 
taken possession of any part thereof, not to lease out y e same to y m for 
more y 11 seaven yeares at y e most, & in case of theire refusall to take 
a lease thereof on equall termes, then yt fortwith they do quitt their 
possessions thereof, & in case of refusall so to do, the Treasurer is 
ordered fortw th to proceed to a Leguall tryall for clearing y e Colledge 
Interest, that so theire continuance in possession may not be further 
Detriment to y e said Colledge 



1 The word "be" is interlined. 

2 This entry is in the hand of President Hoar, as is also the marginal entry, 
and likewise the entry on page [66] of the text. 

a «]\{r" i s written over another word. 

4 The reference is to page [75] of the text, or page 55 of this volume. 

5 The entries on page [67] of the text are in the hand of Treasurer Richards. 



52 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Also whereas Cap 1 George Denison is indebted to y e colledge & 
hath tend red a farme of 300 Acres adjoyning to y e Colledge Lands, 
the Treas.r is ordered to accept his proposall, or in case they cannot 
agree on equall termes concerning it, then to require y e Colledge dues 
from him forthw th , yt it may be disposed of for some other improve- 
ment for ye Colledge use. 

Also y e Treasurer is ordred fortw th to call in all ye moneyes yt are 
due to y e Colledge, from any y* are of y e remoter townes, yt so it may 
be in a readinesse to be disbursed for y e Colledge use, as y e providence 
of God shall afford opportunity, ffinally y e Presid 1 Complaining yt he 
is much damnifyed by y e insufficiency of his fences on y e Colledge 
Lands. The Treasurer is ordered to procure y e same to be made w th 
a stone wall, as speedily as may be. i e, all y e out fences ags* y e high- 
way) and to pay for y e same out of y e Colledge Treasury. 

Further y e Treasurer is ordered to procure a coppy of y e Will of 
y e Hon r d John Glover deceased so farre as referres to y e Colledge, & 
further to act therein as y e matter may require. 

Also y e hono r able Corporacon for y e Indjans haveing ordered their 
Printing presse, letters. & Vtensils to be delivered to y e Colledge the 
Treasurer is ordered fortw th to take order for y e receiving thereof, 
& to dispose of y e same for y e Colledge use & Improvement. 

Septemb r 7 th 1669 x 

Receved by me John Richards Treasurer of Harvard Colledge in 
Cambridge of Thomas Danford late Treasurer of y e said Society, 
six fat cattle & two oxen valued at five pounds in currant country pay, 
& is in liew of y e sheep he y e said Thos Danford received for the Legacy 
of Capt. Richard Sprague to y e said Colledge. I say received y[e] day 
& year above written. 

p me John Richards Treasurer 
of Colledge. 
Vera Copia ex Originali: 

[68] 

v. p. II. 2 



1 This entire entry is crossed out in the original. 

3 This reference, in an unknown hand, is to page [37] of the text, or page 
22 of this volume. 



TREASURER DANFORTH'S ACCOUNT, 1669 53 

Jan rii 25 1672 x 

Mem : at a meeting of the Corporatio it was notyfyed That Elder 
Champney of Cambridg has given 40 acres of land to the Colledg 
lying in Cambridg village w ch his son would exchang w* the Colledge, 
M* Danforth & y e President to make a view 

Also John Heyward of Charlstown lately bequeathed 20 acres 
lying between fresh pond and mr Shermans land. 

Also M r Ezekiell Rogers by will gave part of his library to the 
library whereof none yet come in. See ye Library-book. 

Also m r Ward of Ipswich gave (after some legacyes paid) the re- 
main of his estate wherof no acco* could yet be got. Only there 
was received by m r Danforth in horses to value of 70 H and Thomas 
Hawkins bill worth naught from Elder Pain. 

M r Glovers gift of 5 a p ah : is due for 3 years past fro his son from 
ffebruary 10 : 1669. This feb rii 3 : 1672 ordered to the fellowes. 

-M^^ hn Ward of Ipowich gave the remain of his estate. 

[69 2 ] 

Boston June. 3 d 1669. 

Several Bonds obligations &c. received of M r Thomas 

Danforth late Treasurer of Harvard Colledge. 

& are so much now due to y 6 s d 

Colledge as followeth. 

From M r Francis Willoughby money, eighty pounds, ten shillings. 
& in goods & in provisions, one hundred & nineteen pounds 
ten shillings for w ch he is to pay after 8 H p. Cent, from g £ a 3 
January. 1668 200 : 00 : 00 

From M r Joseph Jewets Exec tors money sixty pounds. & for 
allowance for it to Apr. 23 d . 1669 (beside w* is already 
payd) eleven pounds, seventeen shillings 71 : 17 : 00 

From M r John Russel now of Hadly to be 4 payd in Porke or 
wheat at currant price w th v* 3 Merchant. Sixty eight 
pounds, fifteen shillings 7<* (no interest) 68 : 15 : 07 

From Capt. George Denison money twenty pounds. Interest 

from Sep* iq$2 5 to Sep* 16. 68. Eight pounds 28 : 00 : 00 

1 This entry is in the hand of President Hoar. 

2 The entries on pages [69-70] of the text are in the hand of Treasurer 
Richards. 

3 In the original, "II," "sn," and "ct" are repeated above nearly every set of 
figures, but are here omitted for the sake of clearness. 

4 Substituted for another word crossed out. 

5 The "2" in i'62" is blurred, making the figure somewhat uncertain. 



54 COLLEGE BOOK I 

From Tho: Hawkins of Boston, money twenty two pounds. & 

for Interest to Sep* 20 th 1668. Six pounds eight shillings 28 : 08 : 00 
From Chr. Grant of Watertown p bill, fourteen pounds provision 

no Interest 14 : 00 : 00 

From M r Antipas Newman, money, being ballance of account 

fifty three shillings 2 : 13 : 00 

From John Swan in corn thirty two shillings 1 : 12 : 00 

From M r Richard Parker of Boston, wheat ten pounds thirteen 

& four pence 10 : 13 : 04 

From John Barnard in provisions, Eleven pounds ten shillings . 11 : 10 : 00 

From Henry Green in a cow or wheat, five pounds 5 : 00 : 00 

From Joshua Fisher Country pay, seventeen pounds 17 : 00 : 00 

From M r Edw d Ting five pounds 5 : 00 : 00 

From Chr: Web. wheat, fourteen pounds. & Interest to octo b 

26. 68. three pounds six shillings 17 : 06 : 00 

From W m Chamberlain wheate. six pounds sixteen shillings. . . 06 : 16 : 00 

From Dan 11 Shed, wheat fourteen pounds no interest 14 : 00 : 00 

In a house lett to Seth Perry of Boston for ten pounds g 
annu[ra] £ money & \ wheat, tyme of paym 1 to begin 
March 25 th 1670 one year going for fitting house .... 154 : 08 : 00 
In y e Country Treasurers hand w ch was one hundred pounds 
give[n] by my Lady Moulson. fifty pounds by M r Bridges, 
& other[s] twelve pounds sixteen shillings 4<* to pay fifteen 

pounds p annum 162 : 16 : 04 

In M rs Newgates hands (as M r Danforth saith, but no bill) 
being resting due of an Annuity. 1668. four pounds fourteen 

shillings 4 : 14 : 00 

In all, Eight hundred twenty four pounds nineteen shillings 

& three pence 824 : 19 : 03 

More: one Deed of Gift of a parcell of Meadow given by M r 
Joh: Coggan to y e Colledge, lying at Rumny Marsh now 
in occupation of Rob* Ingols. & Rob fc Burgesse both of 
Lin. Lett at three pounds p annu[w] 
One Anuity of M r John Newgates of five pound g annum * as <p 
Deed under hand & seal. Dat. June 11. 1650. 

The pticular papers obligations &c. above I received from sai[d] M r Danforth 

on y e day first above mentioned, w ch I am to maim[age] improove & disburse for 

y e Colledge use as occasion is, witness 

my hand. John Richards then 

Treasurer of said Colledge] 

This receipt of y e Colledge estate, 

as is conteined in this writeing, was _. . , _ „. , _ 

,,. j, T1 -p,., v Rich rd Belhngham Gov r 

delivered by me John Richards . „ _. _ V~° r ^ 

rr f ^. rn j i tu I as Attests. Simon Bradstree[£] 

Treasurer of y e Colledge to Tho > g , L J 

Danforth, y e late Treasurer _ . jf . 

3d 4^ 1669. Before y * Overseers 

of y e Colledge 

1 A word is here crossed out. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1669-1672 55 

Vera Copia ex Originali l 

[70] 

Septemb r 7 th 1669 

Received of me John Richards Treasurer of Harvard Colledge in 
Cambridge of Thomas Danforth late Treasurer of y e said Society, 
six fat cattle, & two oxen valued at thirty & five pounds in currant 
country pay, & is in liew of y e sheep, he y e s d Tho. Danforth received 
for y e Legacy of Capt. Richard Sprague to y e s d Colledge I say received 
y e day & year above written. 

p me John Richards, Treasurer of y e Colledge 

Vera Copia ex originali. 

in fascicule N°. 1. 

[ 71-74 2 ] 

[75 3 ] 
Acts of y e Corporation since 4 y e 10 th of Decem br5 16726 

January y e 25 th 1672: 

M r Danforths account made vp for y e year past & y e ballance Due 
to him 40 H : 9 str : 1*: l f ordered to be payed to him by y e Treasurer M r 
Richards V Acco t3 fol. V 

Feb r y e 3 d8 1672: 

At a Corporation meeting (all being present) ordered yt M* Richard 
Russell be desired to give y e Colledge testimony 9 of an 162 a : 16 sli :4? 



1 Under this line are a few words which have been trimmed off, the tops of 
the letters only being visible. 
a Pages [71-74] are blank 

3 The entries on pages [75-78] of the text are, with the exceptions noted in 
the footnotes, in the hand of President Hoar. 

4 The word " since" is interlined. 

6 The star under this word was made by John Davis in red ink. See p. 56, note 2. 

6 The date " 1672 " is underscored. 

7 It is not known exactly what book is here referred to. 

8 "3 d " is interlined. 

9 This word is interlined, but as it has been written over another word, the 
two words are difficult to decipher. 



\Ir Gr : fellow 



M Gookin:ff: 



56 COLLEGE BOOK I 

yt y e Country hath of y e Lady Moulsons gift to y e s d Colledge, vnlesse 
there be an assurance of y e 15 H p annum or some graunt to yt effect: 

Also at y e same tyme ordered y* ye money due to a fellow p M r 
Glovers Will viz. 5 H p annum, & testifyed to begin ffefe r y e 9 th . 1669 
be payed vnto ye 10 th of this Instant Feb r : 72 : p M r Habacuck Glover 
to M r Nowels heires, & * W Joseph Brown & W Jn° Richards, in 
equall portions, & yt M r Richards give ym orders to receive it of y e 
said M r Habacuck Glover: 

Also ordered yt M r Brown & M r Richardson draw vp an Account 
to y e Overseers of w* they have received of their Salaryes every way, 
y* so whap] is due to ym from y e Colledge may be Satisfy ed ym & 
yt further establishment be made for y e encouragem* of y e Fellowes 
for future tymes, by y e Honored Overseers as they shall thinke meet : 

*Mem° President Hoar was elected 

July 30. and inaugurated 10. Sept r 
1672. 
J. D. 2 

This mem was made by Treasurer Davis within the present 
century. His authority must have been 3 College Book N°. 3. P. 54. 4 — 
J. Q. — 1839. 5 

[76] 

At a Corporation meeting May 27 th : 1673 

M r Thomas Graves being spoken with concerning his coming to 
be imployed as a fellow of the Colledg: freely declared to the Cor- 
poration that he (upon the Consideration of the whole passed) was 
not free to accept any such imployment. 

Wherupon M r Daniell Gookin is chosen probationer & is forth- 
with to take upon him the charg of a classis. 



1 "&" is interlined. 

a This entry is in red ink. The date " 1672 " is underscored. At the right, 
John Langdon Sibley has written in pencil: 

No : it was 10 December 
JLS 
3 The word " been " is interlined. 

i The reference is to page [54] of College Book III, or page 219 of this 
volume. 

6 This entry is in the hand of President Quincy. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1673 57 

Ordered that Na: Gookin be declared successor unto M r Jer: n. Gookin 4. 
Shephard for the enjoying four pounds p annii of M r Webbs gift: 
from the time of m r Shephards leaving it and during the pleasure of 
the Corporation, v No r 5 

Agreed then with m r Johnson for the font of Long-primeir 

letters in his hand paid for by the Corporation of the Indians be 
allowed him for his use for 3 years for 30 sh pan: in money paid to 
the treasurer of the Colledg. And ten Coppyes of every book he shall 
print to be delivered to the President. 

Sept r 15: 1673. 

The Corporation p r sented M r Daniell Gookin for a ffellow of the 
Colledg for the approbation & establishm* of the Overseers 

Also presented M r Da : Russell & m r Joseph Taylor. 

M r Joseph Browns former resignation of his fellowship was taken 
as valid : & by himself confirmed. 

Also m r Jo Richardson that day resigned his ffellowship. 

Nov 1 5: 1673. 

Ordered by the Corporation that m r Webbs gift for this present mm: 10. Gai 
year 1673 be disposed as formerly, viz: to N. Gookin 4 a . To Emer-g 8 !^ *^ 
son 3 a And l that Andrewes be the third to begin Nov 1 " 16 to August Nov * 3:1674: 
next. Except any of them discontinue And that the President and 
m r Richards doe desire the overseers of m r Webbs will to assent 
hereto & if they please to name the fourth person. 

S r Sewall was chosen ffellow. 

And Nov 1 26 installed in a meeting of the hon rd Overseers: also 
m r Dan a Gookin installed at same time. 

ffeb rij 2: 1673. 

The worpll m r Thomas Danforths acco* by the quarter bills were 
this day adjusted & the Colledg found in his debt 13 H 13 sh ll d which 
by order of the Corporation he was authorized to receive of m r 
Richards the treasurer. 



Here a word is crossed out. 



58 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Emerson for his refusing to come to the praesident when twice sent 
ffor was injoyned and warned to make an acknowledgm* in writing 
on ffryday next. And then also to declame as before by the presi- 
dent he had bin injoyned : for going out of town without leave &c. 

March. 1. 1674. 

Ordered by the Corporation that S r Sewall be from henceforth the 
keeper of the Colled g-Library 

Ordered that m r Cheevers son have the fourth share of m r Webbs 
gift (M r Webbs overseers consenting and sd Cheevers continuing at 
Colledg) till Aug st next. 

[77] 

At the meeting of the Corporation Aprill 15 . 1674. 

In pursuance of the coinand of the hon rd overseers mad[e] the 
fift of the 10 th 1667 It was ordered that the freshmen of the Colledg 
shall not at 2 any time be compelled by any Senior students to goe on 
errands or doe any servile work for them. And if any shall presume 
to send them in times injoyned for study both the sender and the 
goer shall be punished. 

Ordered that m r Gookin and S r Sewell fellowes of the Colledg 
have half a years salary of their proportion forthwith paid them of 
the Piscataway-gift now in the treasurers hands. According as the 
hon rd overseers have directed the same to be proportioned. Also 
fifty shillings apeece due in fTeb nj last by m r Glovers gift. 

May 4. 1674. 

Ordered by the Corporation of Harvard-Coll that all undergraduates 
declaiming in their usuall courses in the hall: shall after their said 
declamations ended deliver a coppy of eac[/i] of them fairly written 
unto the president or senior fTellow then present unlesse they have 
before shewed it to their tutor for his perusall. 



1 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Quincy. The reference is 
apparently to page [23] of the text, or pages 13-14 of this volume. 
3 The word "at" is interlined. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1674 59 



June 15 th 1674 

At the meeting of the Corporation S r Thacher was chosen the 
third fellow of the Colledg and after his acceptance signifyed to be 
presented unto the hon rd Overseers for their consent & confirmation. 

M r 

M* Marmaduke Johnsons bargain made May 27. 1673 was or- 
dered to be confirmed by writings drawn And his priviledg of being 
printer with a serv 1 to the Colledg confirmed to him. 

DecMl: 1674. 

p r sent 
ye p r sid* 
M r Gookin 
Thacher 
M r Richards. 1 

Thomas Sargeant having personally, and by a letter applyed him- 
self to the Corporation for the obtaining of his degree of Bachelor 
of Arts : from which by their sentence he was suspended (the hon rd 
Overseers of the Colledge having consented to the same) the Cor- 
poration doth unanimously 2 consent. 

ffor the filling up the corporation in its number of seaven. The Deer 3. 1674 
sd society doth also unanimously choose the Rev d M r Urian Oakes The overseen 
& M 1 " Thomas Sheppard & m r Increase Mather as ffellowes of the pJSia? & *r* 
sd Colledg. w ch vote the p r sident is desired to acquaint them with, Seedieiy g to w 

_ . , . , , . . , up their No ac- 

& to receive their answer in order to their instalment as customary, cordg to theii 

, " Charter that sc 

at the next meeting of the hon Overseers. y ir power &priv- 

lledge grantd by 

Ordered further that from hencforth M r Daniell Gookin be<~ 0OTrt » M J 

not be weak'ned 

Library-keeper : And that he enquire of persons formerly [concerned SnS^m&^oS. 

seers Book f. 62. s 



for finding out & restoring the book found wanting in the last sur- se cambr! 



15. 



1674. 5. 



veigh ma[de] by the Praesid : himself & m r Gookin Sewal[/] as in Mr oakes Mr 

.1 x *i i i Shephard Mr I. 

the .Library book. Mather P re- 

Ordered that the scholarships and donation of m r Webbs gift of overseers by the 

1 ° Corporation ac- 
cepted, and En- 
treated to ac«ept 

1 The names of those present are written in the margin. 63. e * us ' ° ' 

2 The word I' unanimously" is interlined. 
8 The reference is to College Book II. 

4 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 



60 COLLEGE BOOK I 

all students that now ! discontinue doe accrue to the Colledg stock 
from the last quarter day untill the Corporation choose them again. 

[78] 

Ordered that all the utensills of the Colledg belonging to the buttry 
& the Kitchin (and being inventoryed in this book) doe abide as they 
are lodged in the Kitchin & Buttrey. 

Only the plate to be brought to the p r sidents house and lodged in 
the Colledg desks or chest there. 

And that m r Gookin & Thacher be desired to ask an ace 1 of the 
Colledg linnen or ought else in m r Danforths hands, that it may be 
also inventoryed, in the same book. 

Ordered that the treasurer be desired at the Colledg charg to cause 
to be measured out the bounds of the Colledg farm near Pacatuck 
river in the Colony of Conecticut: & to transact with the farmer 
theron dwelling, as he judgeth may be most for the Colledg benefit. 

The p r sident is desired to present the Lawes made Aprili 15 th 2 & 
May 4 th 1674 to the honoured Overseers at their next meeting for 
their confirmation. 

Ordered that till the 25 th of March next M r P. Thacher have 
liberty to live in Boston provided he be tutor unto the scholars of 
the Colledg there residing, who shall desire it of him. 

Agreed & ordered that the President shall be reimbursed his ex- 
pences on & about the Iaw3 3 house & lands of the Colledg : or for the 
Colledg benefit, as he shall give an ace 1 therof unto the treasurer. 

Ordered that the four persons that commenced Masters in the year 
1674 they having first paid their detrim ts unto the Colledg; shall (on 
speciall reasons) be rebated forty shillings a peece by the Colledg. 

Dec r 21 : 1674. 

The corporation (on occasion of Thomas Sargeants going to sea 
the next week: did meet again: & in pursuance of the grant made 
him Dec r 11 And 4 he 5 performing all exercises before them, 



1 The word "now" is interlined. 

1 A word or letter is here crossed out. 

3 The word crossed out is somewhat obscure: perhaps "lans. " 

4 "And " is written over another word. 
6 The word "he " is interlined. 



INVENTORY OF THE COLLEGE UTENSILS, 1674 61 

w ch are wont to be done in publike. The President did then admit 
him unto the degree of Bachelor in the Arts. And - 1 

[79] 

An Inventory 2 of the Colledge utensills belonging to the 
Kitchin & Butterie. Nov: 18. 1674. 
1 Kitchins Utensils 

1 great Iron Pott 

1 small Iron Pott 
5 Spitts 

2 Iron racks 

2 Iron trammells 
1 Barre of Iron 
1 Paire of tongs 

1 Iron peale 

2 skillets 

2 Iron dripping pans 
1 Beafe fork 
1 Lawne sieve 
1 scummer 

1 Brasse Ladle 

2 paire of pott-hookes 
1 clever 

1 chopping knife 
1 Pestle & mortar 

1 Great Iron Scoale Beame 

2 paire of Scoales 
1 halfe-peck. 

1 Great grid-Iron. 

1 small Jack to turn spitts. 

3 Drie Barrels. 
62 Pewter platters. 
11 sawcers. 

2 pye-plates. 

2 frying-pans. 
1 paile. 

1 prettie big kettle 

3 chafing-dishes. 
1 Little kettle 

1 wooden tray 

1 kneading or sifting troaga 

7 Barrells 

1 paire of slings 



1 The hand of President Hoar ends here. 

2 This inventory is in the hand of UU. 



62 COLLEGE BOOK I 

1 copper hanging in ye brew-hoose 

1 rolling pin 

4 wooden pastie-plates 

1 Mustard-queme 

2 Butterie Utensills 

1 Silver, viz: 3 pounds worth due from m r Pelham Fellow-Communer 

in the hands of ye steward Mr Thomas Danf orth : 
2 salt sellars one little one, one great one 
1 earthen jugge tipped with silver 

1 Bowie 

2 Beakers one marked I B ye other hath no mark W. W. 

1 Silver Tankard given by Mr Samuell parris seven II. ten. s. 

3 silver spoons 

2 Pewter 

2 2 quart potts both without lidds 
1 3 pint pot with ye lead off. 

1 pint pott (aliter a size pott with no lidd 
6 Bowles two bruised one without a foot 

4 * cue-cups very defective. 

4 eared cupps all unfitt for service. 

2 salt sellars batter'd 
9 Juggs — five good. 

1 Tankard with ye lead on it 

4 Brasse candle sticks 
1 flasket 
1 Trunk 

3 Desks 

1 Butterie book 
1 Brasse tapp 



[80 



2 fellowes table-cloaths 

3 tables to putt names on 

In ye hall 
3 brasse candlesticks 
1 chaire 
6 2 formes 

- Callod ovor Nov e mb; 17 71 3 

These things were called over Aug. 3. 77. 



1 Altered from "3." 

3 Apparently altered from "7." 

3 The figure " 74 " is uncertain. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1675 63 

At a meeting of y e Corporation at Cambridge April. 19 th 1675 * 

Present 

Mr Oakes, Presid* M r Dan. Gookin 

Mr Thomas Shepard Mr Peter Thacher 

m r Incr. Mather Mr John Richards Treasurer 

The Honored Overseers having by theire order of April 7 th ' last 
referred y e matter of providing for entertainm* of Schollars at ye col- 
ledge, to ye corporation, with order yt it be suddenly attended. In 
order hereunto m r Thomas Danforth ye late Steward, is again chosen 
to ye place of a Steward of ye Colledge ; and the President m r Oakes 
is desired to acquaint him, therewith and request his acceptance y r of, 
& make provision as ye Colledge occasions may require. 

Wiliam Bordman is likewise chosen Cooke. 

Edward Payson is chosen Butler. 

At a meeting at Cambridge 26. 2. 75. 

M r Sam 11 Danforth was chosen fellow of ye Colledge, & M* Oakes 
desired to present him to the Overseers for their approbatio 

At a meeting of ye Corporation. Jun. 1. 75. 

Present 
M r Vrian Oakes Presd* m r Daniel Gookin 

Mr Thomas Shepard Mr Peter Thacher 3 

Ordered that to Aaron Bordman (ye Colledge Smith) be paid by 
ye Colledge Treasurer twentie shift for mending ye clock : & that 
he be allowed twelve shift, p annum, for his constant tending ye said 
clock, & keeping it in good Order. 

Item. That Minot, Allin, Cheevers, Danforth be Schollars of ye 
house for ye year ensuing, & that Allin receeve five pounds due of ye 
schollarships, & to be presently paid. 

Item That M r Webb's gift be distributed (for ye yeare follow- 
ing) in y s manner viz* — To Nathaniel Gookin four pound, besides 

1 Beginning with this entry, all entries to the end of page [84] of the text are, 
unless otherwise specified in the footnotes, in the hand of VV. 

2 The names of those present are written in the margin. The braces fre- 
quently found in the original are sometimes omitted in the printed volume. 

3 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



64 COLLEGE BOOK I 

three pound due from m r Web's gift ye last yeare, and this last to be 
presently paid. 

To Andrews three pound, besides three pound due of ye schol- 
larships, and y 8 last to be presently paid. 

To Emmerson three pound, besides five pound due of ye scholar- 
ships, & y s last to be presently paid. 

To Swetman three pound, besides forty shillings due of ye schollar- 
ships, & y s last to be presently paid. 

At a meeting of ye Corporatio at Cambridge Sept. 2. 75. 
all being present. 

Ordered by ye Corporatio 

Imp. That Thomas Cheevers shall be y e monitor 
Item That the monies from Pascataway, now in y e Treasurers 
hand be paid, beginning w th ye paym* of what is due to m rs Nowell 
upon y e account of her sons fellowship: & y e remainder vnto y e 
present fellows. 

At a meeting at Cambridge Decemb. 22. 75. 

Ordered by y e Corporatio 
Imp. That Wadsworth be schollar of y e House. 
It. That m r Ammi Corlet, chosen fellow by ye Corporatio, be 
presented to y e overseers for their consent. 

At a meeting at Cambridge Decemb. 27. 75 

M r Daniel Russel chosen to be fellow of y e Colledge and to be pre- 
sented to y e Overseers for y* acceptance. 

At a Meeting of ye Corporatio at Cambridge 11. 2. 76. 
Ordered that S r Allen 2 be Librarie-Keeper 



1 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Quincy. The reference is 
to page [23] of the text, or page 14 of this volume. 
* Perhaps "Allin." 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1676-1678 65 

[81] 

At a meeting of y e * Corporation 22. 6. 1676. All y e 
members thereof being present. 
Ordered, 

1 That m r Samuel Angier be invited to accept of ye plac[e] of a 
probationer, to which he is chosen. 

2 That the Butler ring y e bell at five of y e clock in y* morning, 
winter & Summer, and at nine of y e clock at night throughout y e 
yeare, beside his ringing at y e other stated times for prayers & Meales. 

At a Meeting of ye Corporation Octob. 23. 77. 

Ordered 

That Wadsworth bee the Butler of ye Colledge. 

At A meeting of ye Corporation 14. 3. 77. 

f M r Oakes Presid* 
Shepard 
Gookin 
Corlet. 



Present 



1 : M r John Rogers of Ipswich chosen then by y e Corporation to 
bee president of y e Colledge, nemine contradicente 

2 James Ailing 1 chosen Schollar of ye house. 

3 Three pounds given to Thomas Bernard out of m r Webb's gift 
for y e yeare following. 

At a meeting of ye Corporatio at Cambridge 6. 1. 7f : Bo6t j J ^ 7 r5 

all being present Recomen< 

by the Ovei 

1. M r John Sherman Pastour of y e Church at Watertown was choose a f! 
chosen to bee a fellow of y e Corporation, all consenting : And ye r. mr she* 
President was desired to present him to the Overseers in order to one to off) 

r on the pla 

y r approbatio. needf/ udg 

2 Ordered, That Goodman Brown shall have for his service 
in y e Colledge two shillings p quarter from every schollar particu- 
larly, that holds a study in y* Colledge. 

1 The fourth letter in this name has apparently been altered. 
8 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 
* Apparently altered from " is." 



66 COLLEGE BOOK I 

3 That Percivall ! Green shall have three pound of m r Webb's for 
ye yeare following 

4 That Samuel Mitchel have six pound of ye schollarships that 
remaine vacant. 

5 Russel Sen r was chosen a schollar of y e house for ye yeare fol- 
lowing. 

then calld ov 1- y e Inventory, p. 53. 2 

At a Meeting of ye Corporation at Cambridge Jun. 30 1679. 

Voted, That ye Worsh a M r Stoughton bee desired & empower Jed, 
to Provide a President for this Colledge, and that ye hon[or]ed Over- 
seers concurring herew th , the Rev d M r Oakes bee i[n]treated to write 3 
to M r Stoughton accordingly, in ye name of ye Corporation. 

Voted That M* Daniel Gookin bee chosen Librarie keeper. 

At A Meeting of ye Corporation in Boston July 3. 1679 

Voted & Agreed by the whole Corporation, That M* Penoyer's 
donation of 34 Pound p annum money of England, given to two 
fellows & two Schollars, bee disposed of As followeth viz : from April 
1. 1678. to April 1. 1679. 10 H be given to mf] Gookin & 10 fl to 
M r Foster the Present Fellows, and 7 H to James Allin & 7 a to Noadiah 
Russel, both Schollars of ye colonie of Nox or New haven. 

Voted, That out of what was due from m r Penoyer's Legacy before 
April 1. 1678. 10 a -pea- shall bee disposed of to m r Corlet when once 
ye money shall bee received. 

[82] 

At a Corporation Meeting at Cambridge Oct. 8 th 1679 

Present 
M r Oakes President M r Gookin 

Mr Mather M r Foster 4 

M r Richards 

1. MT Samuell Andrew was chosen a fellow of Harvard Colledge 
nemine contradicente. 



i The word " Percivall " is interlined. 

2 The reference is to page [79] of the text, or page 61 of this volume, 

3 This word is written over a word erased. 

* The names of those present are written in the margin. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1679 67 

2. The Treasurer M r John Richards was empowred, to take care 
of the donation of S r Matthew Holworthy, and to gett it over into the 
country by exchange or otherwaies, as he shall see meet, as soone as 
may bee. 

3. Five pounds of M r Penoya's gift, that is due from April. l at to 
Octob r 1. 1679. was given to m r Isaac Foster. 

4. The Coll. Laundress is allowed forty shillings p annum, for 
washing the Colledge linnen. 

5 Russell Sen r was chosen Butler of the Colledge. 
These things were all agreed upon by vote: 

6 Thomas - 
6 Thomas 

At a Corporation meeting: 2 d . 12 mo . 1679. All being present: 

1. 1VF Urian Oakes was chosen President of Harvard Colledge by 
the unanimous consent of the ffellowes of the sayd Colledge, desireing 
the approbation of the Honoured and Reverend Overseers : 

2. Agreed, That it be left to M r John Richards Treasurer to 
treat with the Executors of M r Joseph Brown deceased about the 
Legacy by him given to Harvard Colledge, and to receive the same 
for the best advantage to the Colledge, 1 and that the Reverend M r 
Increase Mather be intreated to assist the Treasurer in the manage- 
ment of the same 

3. Ordered, that the Treasurer of the Colledge doe pay to M ra 
Belshar for wine of her received and expended at the funerall of M r 
Ammi Ruhamah Corlett: 

4. Agreed, that s r Barnard and Mitchell be schollars of the house 
for one whole year, beginning at the time of the vacancy of the schol- 
arships. 

5. Thomas Andrew and John Wythe were chosen by the Corpora- 
tion for Colledge servants, the one to serve in the place of a bricklayer, 
the other in the place of a plaisterer. 

6. Agreed, That Aaron Bordman be allowed by the Colledge 
Treasurer twenty shillings per annum, in money, for keeping the 
Clock of the sayd Colledge in repaire and constantly looking after it, 
and winding it up : 

1 The words "and to receive the same for the best advantage to the Colledge " 
are interlined. 



68 COLLEGE BOOK I 

At a Corporation meeting: July. 12. 1681. 

Present 
M r Oakes Pres. 
[CJapt. Richards Treas 

} Sherman 
Mather 
Andrew 1 

Agreed, That Mitchell and Russell Sen 1 " be continued scholars of 
the house. 

Agreed, That Danforth and Walter be chosen scholars of the house, 
theire scholarships to begin from the Last Commencement: 

Ordered, That out of M r Webbs gift 6 K the year following be given 
to Webb, and 4 a of the sayd gift unto Tompson: 

Agreed, That the Treasurer of the Colledge be empowred and 
desired to dispose of the money sent out of England, either by letting 
it out, or makeing some purchase therewith, as hec shall Judge, will 
be most conduceing to the advantage of the Colledge. 

At a Meeting of the Corporation, August, 9, 1681. 

1. M r John Cotton was chosen fellow of the Colledge, All consenting: 

2. Concluded that the Honoured M* Thomas Danforth be desired 
to look after the Colledge for the repairing of the sedifice, according 
as there doth appear need thereof: 

The Vote referring to the choise of M r John Cotton as a fellow, was 
presented to and fully approved by the Honoured and Reverend 
Overseers of the Colledge, being assembled at the same time: 

At a Corporation meeting in Boston Anno. 81 

Reverend M r Increase Mather was chosen President of Harvard 
Colledge in Cambridge 

[83] 

At a Meeting of the Corporation in Boston, Novem. 7. 168[i] 

Present 
Capt: Richards 
MO Mather 
V Andrew 
Cotton 3 



1 The names of those present are written in the margin. 
8 The names of those present are written in the margin. 






CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1681-1682 69 

Ordered, that Dudley be chosen a scholar of the House. 
Ordered, that M r John Cotton be chosen Library Keeper: 
Ordered, that the worshipfull Capt : John Richards, and the Rev- 
erend M r Increase Mather be desired with all expedition to demand 
and receive of John Scarlett * the executor of Cap* Samuel Scarlett 
what money is due to the Colledge on the account of a Legacy or 
annuity from the sayd Cap* Scarlett; and if the Executor refuse or 
neglect to pay it, then to prosecute him in a course of law : 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Boston. Decern. 13. 1681 

Present 
Cap* Richards 

1 Mather 
M r J- Andrew 

J Cotton 3 

M r Nehemiah Hubbard 3 was chosen a Fellow of the Colledge in 
Cambridge by the unanimous consent of the Corporation. 

Ordered, that 3r the Treasurer of the Colledge be desired to cause 
a Letter of Attorney to be drawn up to impower some one to receive 
what is due to the Colledge on the account of M r Penoyer and M r 
Dodderidge theire gifts, and that they may give discharges upon the 
Receipt thereof: 

At a Meeting of the Corporation in Boston, January : 5. 1681 

Present 
Capt: Richards 

1 Mather 
Hobart 
Andrew 
Cotton * 

The Reverend M* Samuel Torrey Pastor of the Church in Wey- 
mouth was chosen President of Harvard Colledge by the unanimous 
vote of the Corporation. 

Ordered, that Cotton be one of the Scholars of the house. 

Ordered, that Whiteing shall receive three pound of M r Webbs 
gift, which is yet to be disposed of : 

1 The third letter in this name has been altered. 

2 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

3 Above Hubbard is written in pencil "Hobart." 

* The names of those present are written in the margin. 



70 COLLEGE BOOK I 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Cambridge, March. 27. 1682 

Present 

Capt Richards 

Mather 

Hobart 

Andrew 

Cotton l 



Mr 



Ordered, that what is due to the Colledge from the Rev^m 1 " Sea- 
born Cotton on the account of detriments or halfe tuition for his son, 
M* John Cotton, shall be remitte[d.] 

Ordered, that what remaynes due from M 1 " Richard Russe[Z] before 
his decease for scholarships, supposed to be aboup] ten pound, be 
disposed of to S r Mitchell: 

Ordered, that what is due to the Colledge, from the Rev* Mr 
Increase Mather, on the account of detriment^] or halfe tuition for 
his son, M r Cotton Mather, be remitted : 

Whereas great Complaints have been made and proved again[,s£] 
webb for his abusive carriages, in requireing some of the freshmen to 
goe upon his private errands, and in strikein[#] the sayd freshmen; 
and for his scandalous negligence as to those duties, that by the Laws 
of the Colledge he is bound to attend, and haveing persisted obstinately 
in hi[s] evills, notwithstanding means used to reclaime him, and 
a\[so] haveing refused to attend the Corporation, when this day re- 
quired, he is therefore sentenced, in the first place to be deprived of 
the pension heretofore allowed him as also to be expelled the Colledge, 
and in case he sha[ZZ] presume after 24 houres are past to appear 
withi[/i] the Colledge walls, that then the fellows upon the place doe 
cause him to be carried before the civill authority : 

[84] 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Boston : Aprill. 10. 1682. 

Present 
Cap* Richards 



M> 



Mather 
Hobart 
Andrew 
Cotton a 



1 The names of those present are written in the margin. 
8 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



PETITION OF JOSEPH WEBB, 1682 71 

Whereas the Worship? Cap* Richards is goeing for England he is 
desired to leave the accounts of the Colledge, and the Papers, which 
concern the Colledge stock in the hand of the Hon rd Thomas Dan- 
forth the present Deputy Governour, untill Cap* Richards his return 
from England or untill another Treasurer be chosen. 

Ordered, that the present Resident fellows, viz, M 1 Samuel Andrew 
and M r John Cotton, shall (upon consideration of their great care 
and paines) be allowed, each of them 50 tt in money, out of the Colledge 
revenue, for this present year, ending at the Commencement ; that is 
to say, there shall be added unto what they have already received so 
much 1 as shall make theire salary for this year, for each of them, 50 a . 

M r John Rogers was chosen President of Harvard Colledge in 
Cambridge. 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Boston : May. 4. 82. 

Present 
Cap* Richards 
Mr"l Mather 

Hobart 

Andrew 

Cotton 3 

The Petition of Joseph Webb formerly expelled the Colledge to the 
Corporation for his readmission 

To the Most Honoured Corporation : 

Whereas I Joseph Webb late student of Harvard Colledge by my 
culpable negligence of Colledge duties, and other misdemeanours in 
abuseing and strikeing some freshmen, have incurred the penalty of 
expulsion justly imposed upon mee by the Honoured Corporation, 
according to the laws of the Colledge, therefore Honoured and Rev- 
erend, being now made sensible, I doe with greif and sorrow humbly 
acknowledge those my great offences, and the Justice of your pro- 
ceedings against mee for them, crave your pardon, and pray that I 
may be restored unto my former standing in the Colledge, promise- 
ing utmost labour and diligence in my study, and most dutifull ob- 
servance of all the Colledge laws and orders for the time to come : 

Your most humble suppliant 

Aprill. 26. 1682. Joseph Webb 

1 The words "so much" are interlined. 

2 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



72 COLLEGE BOOK I 

The Corporation haveing read and considered Webbs confession 
and Petition above written, doe consent that he shall be readmitted 
into the Colledge upon his good behaviour; provided this his confes- 
sion be read, and by Webb publickly acknowledged In the Colledge 
Hall: 

At a Corporation meeting 

Ordered, by the Cor that the double books in the Colledge Library 
be prized and sold, and the money improved for the buying other 
books that are wanting : 

At a Corporation meeting at Cambridge, Jan. 10. 8§ . 



[Pre]sent 
Mr 



'Mr Rogers 
M r Hobart 
Andrew 
Cotton J 



Voted, that the worshipfull Cap 1 John Richards Esq r be impowred 
as an Attourney in behalf e of the Corporation of Harvard Colledge, 
to call in and receive the monies, which are due as arrears from the 
gift of M r William Penoyer or any other, and upon the receipt of the 
sayd monies to give a full discharge and acquittance : 

Voted, that the worshipfull Samuel No well Esq r be Treasurer of 
Harvard Colledge, still reserving Liberty for the worshipfull Cap* 
Richards to reassume the place at his return : 2 

[85] 

At a Meeting of the Corporation March. 22. 168|. 3 

Present 

M r ( Mather 

I Hobart 

J Andrews 

(Cotton * 

Ordered, That the Treasurer of the Colledge do, of the next money 
belonging to y e Colledge, w ch shall be by him received, pay to the 



1 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

2 The hand of VV ends here. 

3 This entry is in the hand of WW. 

* The names of those present are written in the margin. 



INVENTORY OF THE COLLEGE UTENSILS, 1683 



73 



ffellows upon the place, what yet remains as due to them, by y e vote 
of the Corporation bearing date April 10. 1682 ' 

Ordered, That Eliot, Whiting, Mills, Philips, shall have each of 
them for the next year five pounds per Annum given to them out of 
the Colledges Revenue. This vote to begin from y e 26 th of this 
instant March. 



An Inventory 2 of y e Colledge Utensills belonging to y* 
Butterie October 26: 1683 

2 Silver wine bowls 
Imprim: Silver: — is&2 saltsellers 1 great one, 1 little one 

1 Earthen Jugge tipped w ttl silver — of this y e 2 wine bowls abo[w] 
mentioned were made 

1 Bowie 

2 Beakers one marked I:B. the other W:W. 

1 Silver Tankard mark'd S: P. 

2 Silver Spoones 

1 Goblet given by m r Edward Paige Fell w commun 1 " with his name 

engraven on it. 
1 Goblet given by m r Fr: Wainwright Fell w commun r 
1 Goblet given by the reverend M r Thomas Shepard Sen r of 

Charlestown 

1 Goblet given by M r Brown ffellow communer 
Pewter 4 Flagons Good & serviceable 

2 two quart Pots with lids, good, 

2 two quart Pots without lids, & Battered 
1 3 pint Pot without a Lid. 

1 Tankard unfit for service 

2 New Jugges with lids 

4 other Jugges one with a lid y e other without 
4 old Jugges unfit for service 

3 Size Pots two new w ttx Lids, y e other without. 

4 New Saltsellers 

2 old Battered Salt Sellers 
4 Small cups new 

3 Bowles Battered 

4 cups w th ears unfit for service 
2 cue cups one unfit for service 

Brasse 4 Brasse Candle-sticks 
Linnen Table Linnen 

Imp. 1 Commencement Linnen 5 Diaper Table cloethes 3 Long on[es] 2 
small square ones. 



1 Apparently altered from " 168 f." 

2 This inventory is in the hand of Treasurer Richards. 



74 COLLEGE BOOK I 

2 : 7 Dozen & 4 Diaper Napkins. 
3 : 2 Long Towells ; new. 

1 old Towell unfit for service. 
Item 2 Common Table Linnen 

3 Fellow's Table cloeths new 

3 Table cloeths new for ye lower Table. 

3 old Table-cloeths Almost wore out. 

Wooden 1 Table 
ware 4 canns 2 new : 2 old. 

Trenchers 12 Dozen 

Taps 6 

Bear Barrells 4 

3 Tables to put names on. 1 great desk. 1 salt box. 

1 Tap-boarer 

In the Hall 

3 Tables 

6 formes 

1 chair 

3 Desks. 

1 curtain to one of ye North Windowes. 

1 small Buttery Book 

[ 86-88 x ] 

[89 2 ] 
At a meeting of the Corporation in Cambridge Dec. 5. 1683. 

Present 
M r Rogers President 
M r f Sherman 

Mather 

Hobart 

Andrew 
^Cotton 3 

Voted, that Walter be chosen Butler. 

Ordered, that the Schollars of the house for y e year ensuing shall be 
S r Mitchell, S r Danforth, Dennison, Saltonstall, Dudley, & Cotton. 

Ordered, that upon consideration of the great paines w ch the present 
ffellows Resident in y e Colledge, viz : M r Andrew & M* Cotton have 



1 Pages [86-88] are blank. 

2 The entries on pages [89, 91, 93] of the text are in the hand of XX. 

3 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



WILLIAM PENNOYER's LEGACY 75 

taken, their Allowance for y e year past, beginning at y e Comenc[e]ment 
1682, shall be forty five pound in money, to each of them; & that 
what the Income from y e ferry at Charlstown, & M r Glovers gift dos 
come short of this Sume, shall be made up out of y e monef?/] received 
in England by y e Honoured Treasurer of y e Colledge Maj r Richards. 

Ordered, that John Palfrey be chosen y e Colledge- Joyner. 

Ordered, that the Butler shall, on y e account of his drawing of 
Cyder, have eighteen pence p Barrell allowed him. 

Ordered, y* The Cook be allowed from y e Colledge w* he shall 
expend annually for Wood-cutting. 

It was voted & agreed unanimously by y e Corporation, y* the Pres- 
ident be desired to speak to y e Govern 1 *, to entreat y* the Overseers 
would please to order y e comencement for y e future to be on y e first 
Wednesday in July. 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Cambridge. March. 17. 168$. 

Present 
M r Rogers President Mr / Sherman 

{Cap 1 Richards! Mather 

M r Nowel J J Hobart 

Andrew 
(Cotton » 

Voted, that out of M r Penoyers gift, be given to Chauncy tenn 
pound : & seven pound ten shillings to Davenpo[/^] 

Voted, that Eliot, Whiting, Mills, & Philips shall have eac[h] of 
them for y e next year five pounds in money given to them this vote 
to begin from y e twenty sixth of March 1684. 

[90 2 ] 

[91] 

Legacy from y e late M r Penoyer Esq r of y e remainder 
of a farme in Norfolke formerly let at 44 1 p annum, 
now at 30 H beside charges to be deducted is .... D r 

1679 To disbursed toward maintenance of Noadiah Russel Scholar ft s d 

belonging to New Haven Collony 8-15-0 

1679 To disbursed toward maintenance of James Allen Scholar belong- 
ing to y e same Colony 8-15-0 

1 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

2 Page [90] is blank. 



76 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



1679. To disbursed towards y e maintenance of M r Daniel Gookin 

ffellow of s<* Colledge 12-10-0 

1679. To disbursed towards y e maintenance of M r Isaac ffoster 

ffellow &c • . • . . 12-10-0 

1680 To disbursed towards maintenance of M r Annni Ruhamah 

Corlet ffellow 12-10-0 

1680 To disbursed to M r Isaac ffoster fellow more 6- 5-0 

1684 To disbursed for y e maintenance of Charles Chauncy belonging 

to N-haven Collony 10-0^0 

1684 To disbursed for y e maintenance of J no Davenport belonging 

to N. haven Collony 7-10-0 

1683 To disbursed towards y e maintenance of M r Samuel Andrew 

& M r John Cotton being two of y e ffellows of y e Colledge . . 36- 0-O 
1684. To disbursed towards y e maintenance of J no Denison Scholar . 10- 0-0 

Vert, ad ffol. 72 x 

[92 2 ] 



[93] 



At a meeting of y e Overseers, on the Comencem* day 
Cambridge July 1. 84. 



Present 



Simon Bradsreet Gov r 
Daniel Gookin 
William Stoughton 
Maj r Bulkly 
Maj r Saltonstall 
Humphry Davy J- Esq 1 
J no Richards 
James Russell 
W m Johnson 
Sam 1 Sewal 



Mr jno Eliot 
M r James Allin 
Mr Sam 1 Willard 
Mr Tho. Shepard 3 



Whereas p a suddain visitation by Sickness the present President 
is disinabled from officiating in y e work of y e day, in carrying on y e 
Comencement; The Overseers of the Colledge, have nominated, 
appointed, & ordered the Reverend m r William Hubberd to manage 
y e same, & do fully impower him to admitt to & conferr upon the Per- 
sons 4 concerned their degrees belonging to them respectively 

John Richards p order 

1 The reference is to page [98] of the text, or page 81 of this volume. 

2 Page [92] is blank. 

3 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

4 Apparently altered from " persons." 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1684-1685 77 

At a meeting of y e Corporation in Cambridge Octo. 1. 84. 

Ordered, that y e Rent of the house belonging to y e Colledge now 
let to Seth Perry shall for this year, be disposed of for y e encouragem* 
of y e Rogers's, in case they shall continue to be in comons. 

Ordered, That y e Schollars of the house for y e next year shall be, 
S r Danforth, Dudley, 1 Cotton, Rogers S nr Rogers J nr Mitchell 

At a meeting of y e Corporation of Harvard Colledge July 21. 1684. 

Whether do you consent that y e Reverend M r Joshua Moodey be 
chosen President of Harvard Colledge ? Voted in y e Affirmative. 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Boston Octo. 16. 1684. 

Ordered, that out of M r Penoyers money received by & now in 
y e hands of y e Honourd Maj r Richards, eighteen pounds shall be 
disposed to M r Andrew, & eighteen to M r J no Cotton y e present 
ffellowes of y e Colledge. 

At a meeting of the Corporation. Octob. 30. 1684. 

MT Samuel Mitchell was chosen a Probationer, & desired to under- 
take y e charge of y e class of y e Sophimores untill further order. 

At a meeting of the Corporation of the Colledge in 
Cambridge. March. 2. 8{. 

Ordered, y* tenne pounds shall be given to Davenport, out of 
M r Penoyrs gift, & of y* money now in y e hands of y e Hon d Maj r 
Richards. 

At a meeting of the Corporation of y e Colledge in 
Cambridge March. 23. 8f 

Ordered, y* Chauncey be appointed a Waiter at y e ffellowes table, 
when the present Wayter shall lay down his place. 

Ordered, y* Dasset be appointed a Wayter at the Schollars table, 
when the present Waiter shall lay down his place. 

Voted, y* S r Saltonstall be chosen Butler. 



1 The letter " e " in this name is interlined. 



78 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[94] 

Voted, y* M r Leveret be chosen a Probationer, & be desired to 
take y e care of y e class of Sophimores. 

At a meeting of y e Corporation in Cambridge March. 23 168^. 

Welches expulsion was voted in these words — 

Whereas Welch has from his own confession before two Witnesses, 
bin convicted of Theft, & is under vehement suspicion of guilt in 
respect of other Acts of stealing, at several times & from several Per- 
sons, & is also proved guilty of notorious lying; He is sentenced to 
be expelled y e Colledge as a Person unworthy to belong to such a 
Society. 1 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Cambridge May. 4. 1685. 2 

Whereas Mr Wainright a Fellow Coinoner belonging to this So- 
ciety has been proved scandalously guilty of breaking y e 3 d , 8 th , & 
9 th Comandts of ye moral Law, hee is ordered to make a Publick 
acknowledg 1 of his offences in y e Colledge Hall, & there also to be 
admonished. And except his future conversation shall Testify for 
him, hee is Judged worthy an expulsion. 

Ordered, y* w 1 is or shall be 3 due to y e Colledge from Mather Junior 
on account of detriments shall be remitted. 

Ordered, y* out of absent Comons of bread & bear shall be allowed 
to y e Butler thirty shillings on account of washing y e trenchers 

Ordered, y* Andrew Boardman be appointed y e Colledge Cooke. 

June 11. 1685. 4 

At a meeting of the Hon d & Rev* Overseers of Harvard 
Colledge at Boston. 

The Reverend M r Increase Mather was requested to take special 
care for y e Government of y e Colledge, & for y l 5 end to act as Presi- 
dent till a further settlem 1 be orderly made. 

Exemplar Verum. Tho: Danforth CI. 

1 Down to this point, the entries on page [94] of the text are in the hand 
of XX. 

2 This entry is in the hand of President Mather. 

* The words " or shall be" are interlined. 
1 This entry is in the hand of XX. 

* The word "y l " is interlined. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1685 79 

Sept 8. 1685. 1 Welch having made a Publick acknowledgement in 
y e Colledge Hall, (herein hee did confess y* y e Corporation had justly 
expelled 2 him) & promised 3 hee would endeavo r to approve 4 himself as 
became him for y e future, in case of his Readmission into y e Colledge, 
Hee was yn Readmitted. 

At a General 5 Court held at Boston 27 th of May 1685. 6 

In answer to a motion made by y e Overseers of y e Colledge this 
Court doth order, That the hundred pounds part of y e Annual Salary 
due to y e President ; be paid to y e Corporation, for y e encouragement 
of such as have done y e work, y* appertains to y e President; & dis- 
charge of some other Accounts y* have bee[n] made for y e Colledge 
Benefit — 

By y e Court Edward Rawson 
Secretary] 

At a meeting of y e Corporation in Cambridge 7 July 2. 1685. 

Whereas the General Court held at Boston May 27. 1685. has 
ordered y* the hundred pounds p fc of y e Annual Salary for the Presi- 
dent, be payed to y e Corporation; It is hereby ordered by y e Cor- 
poration, y* y e s d 100 a be disposed of as followeth, viz. tenn pounds to 
W J no Leveret: & forty pounds to M r J no Cotton, y e present ffellows 
of y e Colledge ; & 50 H to M r Manning in full discharge of w* is due 
to him on account of disbursements from y e Colledge. 

At a meeting of y e Corporation in Cambridge Sept 15. 1685. 8 

Mr John Leveret & M r Samuel Mitchell were chosen Fellows of 
ye Colledge 

1 This entry is in the hand of President Mather. 

2 This word has apparently been altered. 

3 A word is here crossed out. 

4 Perhaps " express." 

5 The word "General " is interlined. 

6 This entry and the next entry are in the hand of XX. 

7 Substituted for "Corpo," crossed out. 

8 The heading and the first paragraph of this meeting are in the hand of 
President Mather. 



80 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Sir Rolfe was chosen a scholar of y e house in y e room of S r Cotton, 
& y e rest continued. 1 

Voted, y* in answer to y e request of the Present Coo[&] viz Andrew 
Bordman, the cooks Salary shall be annually forty pounds, excluding 
Comons. 2 

Ordered, yt 10 fi shall be allowed to each of y e three 3 Fellows out 
of y t money now in y e hands of y e hono rd Major Richards 4 

Nov. 25. 85. 5 It was then agreed by the President & ffellows — 
That to the Butlers annual allowance for candles should be added 
tenn shillings on y e acc w of w* is spent in 6 to- drawing cider. 

[96'] 

April. 12. 1686, It was yn agreed 8 y* Davenport senior should have 
12 a allowed him out of y* money of Mr Penoyers now in y e hands 
of y e hon rd Major Richards. 

Ordered, y* ye fence between Colledges land & Mrs Mitchells 
shall be forthw th sett vp, & y* Mr Cotton be desired to take care to 
see it done. 

Ordered y fc Mr M r 9 Cotton & W Leveret shall each of y m be 
allowed 10 s out of M* Penoyers legacy now in y e hands of Major 
Richards. 

Ordered y* M* Sam. Mitchell shall have 10 H allowed him out of 
Mr dodderedges gift, of the money now in y* hands of Major Richards. 

April. 25. 1686. 10 Ordered by ye prsident & Fellows y* w 1 is due 
to Colledge fro y e 2 Sir Willams & on ye account of detriments, shall 
be remitted. 



1 The words " Sir Rolfe was chosen a scholar of y e house " in this paragraph 
are in the hand of President Mather ; the remainder of the paragraph is in the 
hand of XX. 

2 This paragraph is in the hand of XX. 

3 The word "three " is interlined. 

4 This paragraph is in the hand of President Mather. 
6 This entry is in the hand of XX. 

6 The words "w fc is spent in " are interlined. 

7 The entries on pages [96-97] of the text are in the hand of President 
Mather. 

8 Written over " ordered." 

8 The letter " M " in this word is written over " L." 

10 The "5 " in "25 " and the "6 " in "1686 " have both been altered from the 
figures originally written. 






WILLIAM PENNOYER'S LEGACY 81 

July 8. 1686: Ordered y* fr y s prsent year Mr Penoyers legacy 
shall be dispossed of to y e present Tutors Mr Leveret & Mr Brattle, 
& to Davenport senior, & Jones each of ym six pound. 

[97] 

March. 8. 168f Ordered by y e Rector & Tutors, y* Rogers be 
appointed ye Colledge Butler, S r Salstonstall laying down his place 
as Butler. 



April. 22. 1687. Ordered y* Buckingham shall have * y e Monitors 
place. 2 

[98 s ] 

Legacy from the Late W m Penoyer Esq r to Harvard 

Colledge In New Eng id . D r 

July 17. 85. To Disburst toward Maintainance of Jn° Davenport ii 8 d 

Schollar of New Haven 10-00-00 

Novem. 5 To M r Leverett & M r Mitchel ffellows 16-12-10 

June. 4. 86 To Jn° Davenport above s d 12-00-00 

23 To M r Cotton, Leverett & Mitchell fellows 30-00-00 

Octob. 8 To Jones of New-Haven, Schollar 06-00-00 

May, 23. 87. To M r Leverett & M r Brattle ffellows 6* 1 each 12-00-00 

28 To Davenport of New Haven, Schollar 06-00-00 

£92-12-10 

This * is a true Acc° of what is rec d of 

& Disposition thereof . . Cambridge. 

[99] 

p Contra C r 

ii s d 
By Ball of an Acc° Sent March 23. 8f 60-2-0 

Octob r 17. 85. By Rec d of M r Hump r Davy fro M r Edm d White of 
London 13 L 7 s -4 d advance at 25 p C is 16-14-2 w ch 
is rent to March 25° 84 16-14-2 

July. 30. 86. By money of M r Jn° Davy by Exche from s d White 
— 12^-13-4 in Londn advance at 25 p C is 15-16-8, 

w ch is Rent to March 25° 85 15-16-8 

£ 92-12-10 

the Legacy of the Late W m Penoyer Esq 1 " 

Aug 8 * prim. 1687 

1 Apparently altered from " be." 

2 Under this entry two or three words have been crossed out. 

3 The entries on pages [98-99] are in the hand of President Leverett. 

4 This line and the next line are written across pages [98] and [99] of the 
text, which face one another, and connect with the last two lines on page [99] 
of the text, or page 81 of this volume. 



82 COLLEGE BOOK I 

[100 1 ] 

[101] 

Nomina Graduatorum 2 

Having observed, y* y e Names of those Graduated in Harvard Col- 
lege, are not recorded in any of y e College-Books, I thought such an 
omission ought not to be continued. Therefore I (Benjamin Wads- 
worth, President) think meet now, Jan. 23. 1733/4. to insert in this 
College Book, y e following Catalogue of Graduates printed An. Dom. 

1733. 

Tobias Barnard. 
An. Dom. 1642. Nathanael Bruster. Th. Bac. 

Benjamin Woodbridge S.T.D. 

Georgius Downing. 

Johannes Bulkley. m r 

Gulielmus Hubbard. m r Johannes Jones. m r 

Samuel Bellingham. m r Samuel Mather. m r . Socius. 

Johannes Wilson. m r Samuel Danforth. m r . Socius. 

Henricus Saltonstal. Johannes Allen. 



Dub. Hib. 



1643. 



1 Page [100] is blank. 

2 As this list of graduates extends from 1642 to 1795, inclusive, the names are 
of course in various hands. These hands are identified in footnotes, so far as 
possible. Thus, the names from 1642 to 1736, inclusive, are in the hand of 
President Wadsworth. But in many cases words or letters were added to the 
names at a later period; and these additions are generally in a hand different 
from that in which the names themselves were written. These additions are 
printed in italics. Hence in this list of graduates, italics are used with a different 
signification from elsewhere in the volume. 

Honorary degrees were first conferred in 1692. In the Triennial Catalogues 
prior to 1830 the names of those who were not alumni of Harvard College, but 
had been admitted ad eundem, or had there received a medical, law, or honorary 
degree, were placed at the end of the classes of contemporary graduates, and thus 
scattered through the volume. In the Triennial Catalogue for 1830 Mr. Sibley 
put those names b3 r themselves in appropriate divisions and arranged chronologi- 
cally according to the years of their degrees. (See 1 Proceedings of the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society for October, 1864, viii. 39.) In this respect, the list in 
College Book I follows the Triennial Catalogues before 1830. 

Down to 1769 the members of each class, at some time during their Freshman 
year, were "placed" in an order of precedence corresponding to the social posi- 
tion of their fathers, and a common form of punishment was to degrade a student 
a certain number of places in his class. This principle was applied for the last 
time in June, 1769, in the case of the Class which had entered in 1768 and was 
to graduate in 1772. In the list of graduates in College Book I, and also in the 
Quinquennial Catalogues, the names of the members of all classes down through 
1772 preserve the order of their original "placing." The alphabetical arrange- 
ment begins with the class of 1773. (See Publications of this Society, x. 41 note.) 






LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



83 



1644. 

1645. 

Johannes Oliver. 
Jeremias Holland. 
Gulielmus Ames. 
Johannes Russel. m r 
Samuel Stow. m r 
Jacobus Ward. 
Robertus Johnson. 

1646. 

Johannes Alcoek. m r 
Johannes Brock. m r 
Georgius Stirk. 
Nathanael White. m r 

1647. 

Jonathan Mitchel. m r Socius. 
Nathanael Mather. m r . 
Consolantius Star. m r Socius. 
Johannes Barden. 
Abrahamus Waiver. 
Georgius Hadden. m r 
Gulielmus Mild way. m r 

1648 

1649. 

Johannes Rogers, m 1 * Prseses. 
Samuel Eaton. m r Socius 
Urianus Oakes. m r . Socius. Prseses. 
Johannes Collins. m r . Socius. 
Johannes Bowers. 

1650 

Gulielmus Stoughton m r oxoni[ 

Johannes Glover M.D. Aberdon. 

Joshua Hobart. m r 

Jeremias Hobart. m r 

Edmundus Weld. 

Samuel Phillips. m r 

Leonardus Hoar. M.D. Cantab. Prseses. 

Isaacus Allerton. 

Jonathan Ince. m r 



1651 

Michael Wiggles worth m r . Socius. 
Marigena Cotton. m r 
Thomas Dudley. m r . Socius. 
Johannes Glover. m r 
Henricus Butler. m r 
Nathanael Pelham 
Johannes Davis. m r 
Isaacus Chauncey. m r 
Ichabod Chauncey. m r 
Jonathan Burr. m r 

1652 
Josephus Rowlandson 

1653. Aug. 9. 

Samuel Willis 
Johannes Angier. m r 
Thomas Shepherd. m r . Socius. 
Samuel Nowel. m r . Soc. Thesau[ra]riu[s] 
Richard Hubbard. m r 
Johannes Whiting. m r 
Samuel Hooker. m r Socius. 
Johannes Stone. m r Cantabr. Angl 
Gulielmus Thompson. 

Ad Secundum Gradum admissi fuere. 

An. 1655. 
Baccalaurei vero Sequentes. 1656. 

ut moris est. 

1653. Aug. 10 

Edvardus Rawson 
Samuel Bradstreet. m r Soci[ws]. 
Joshua Long. m r 
Samuel V/hiting. m r 
Joshua Moodey. m r . Socius 
Joshua Ambrose. m r . Oxonii 
Nehemiah Ambrose. m r . Soc[iws] 
Thomas Crosbey. 



1654. 



Philippus Nelson. 

1655 

Gershom Bulkley. m r Sociu[s] 
Mordecai Matthews 



84 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



[102 



An. Dom. 1656. 



Eleazarus Mather. 

Crescentius Mather. m r Dub. Hib. So- 

cius, Rector. Praeses. S.T.D. 
Robertus Pain. m r 
Shubael Dummer. 
Johannes Haynes. m r Cantabr. 
Johannes Eliot. m r 
Thomas Greaves. m r . Socius. 
Johannes Emerson. m r 

1657. 

Zecharias Symmes. m r Socius. 
Zecharias Brigden. m r . Socius. 
Johannes Cotton. m r 
Johannes Hale. m r 
Elisha Cook. m r 
Johannes Whiting 
Barnabas Chauncey. m r 



1658 

Josephus Eliot. m r 
Josephus Haynes. 
Benjamin Bunker m r 
Jonas Fordham. 
Johannes Barsham. 
Samuel Talcot. 
Samuel Shepherd. m r Socius. 

1659. 

Nathanael Saltonstal 

Samuel Alcock 

Abijah Savage 

Samuel Willard. m r . Socius. V. 

Thomas Parish. 

Samuel Cheever. 

Ezekiel Rogers 

Samuel Belcher 

Jacobus Noyes * 

Moses Noyes 



1660 

Simon Bradstreet m r . 
Nathanael Collins. m r 
Samuel Eliot. m r Socius. 
Gulielmus Whittingham. 
Josephus Cook. 
Samuel Carter. 
Manasseh Armitage. 
Petrus Bulkley. m r Socius. 

1661. 

Johannes Bellingham. m r 
Nathanael Chauncey. m r Socius. 
Elnathan Chauncey. m r 
Israel Chauncey. m r 
Compensantius 2 Osborn. 
Daniel Weld. 
Josephus Cook 

Josephus Whiting. m r Socius 
Caleb Watson. m r 
Johannes Parker. 
Thomas Johnson. 
Bezaleel Sherman. 

1662. 

Johannes Holyoke. 
Benjamin Thompson 
Solomon Stoddard, m r Socius. 
Moses Fiske. m r 
Ephraim Savage 
Thomas Oakes. 

1663. 

Samuel Symond. 
Samuel Cobbet. 
Johannes Rayner. m r 
Benjamin Blackman. 
Thomas Mighil. m r 
Nathanael Cutler. 



1 Originally written "Noyse," then the letters *'se" crossed out and above 
them written "es." 

2 A letter is here crossed out. 






j 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



85 



1664 

Alexander Nowel, m r Socius. 
Josiah Flynt. m r 
Josephus Pynchon. m r Socius. 
Samuel Brackenbury. m r 
Johannes Woodbridge 
Josephus Estabrooke. m r 
Samuel Street 

1665 

Benjamin Eliot. m r 
Josephus Dudley. m r 
Samuel Bishop. 
Edwardus Mitchelson 
Samuel Man. 
Sperantius Atherton 
Jabez Fox. m r 
Caleb Cheeschaumuck. Indus 

1666. 

Josephus Brown. m r Socius. 
Johannes Richardson. m r Socius 
Daniel Mason. 
Johannes Filer 

1667. 

Johannes Harriman. m r 
Nathanael Atkinson 



Johannes Foster 

Gershom Hobart. m r 

Japhet Hobart 

Nehemiah Hobart. m r Socius. 

Nicolaus Noyes. m r 

1668 

Adamus Winthrop 
Johannes Cullick 
Zecharias Whitman 
Abrahamus Peirson 
Johannes Prudden. 



1669. 

Samuel Epps. m r 
Daniel Epps. 
Jeremias Shepherd. m r 
Daniel Gookin. m r Socius 
Johannes Bridgham m r 
Daniel Russel. m r Socius. 
Josephus Taylor. m r Socius. 
Jacobus Bayley. m r 
Josephus Gerrish. 
Samuel Treat. m r 



Thomas Wells. m r 1703 



[103] 



1670. 



Nathanael Higginson m r 
Ammi Ruhamah Corlet. m r 
Thomas Clark. m r . Socius. 
Georgius Burrough 

1671 

Isaacus Foster. m r Socius. 
Samuel Phips. m r 
Samuel Sewal. m r Socius. 
Samuel Mather. 
Samuel Danforth m r 
Petrus Thacher. m r Socius. 
Gulielmus Adams. M r 
Thomas Weld. m r 
Johannes Bowles. m r 



Johannes Norton. m r 
Edvardus Taylor, e** 

if- 1672. 



1673. 

Edvardus Pelham. 
Georgius Alcock 
Samuel Angier. m r Socius. 
Johannes Wise. m r 



1674. 

Edmundus Davie. M. D. Paduse. 
Thomas Sargent. 



86 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



1675. 

Joscphus Hawley. 
Johannes Pike. m r 
Jonathan Russel m r 
Petrus Oliver. m r 
Samuel Andrew. m r Socias. 
Jacobus Minot. 
Timotheus Woodbridge. m r . 
Daniel Allin. m r 
Johannes Emerson. m r 
Nathanael Gookin. m r Socius 



Thomas Bridge. m r 1706 

1676. 

Thomas Shepherd. m r 

Thomas Brattle. m r . Soc. Thesaurarius 

Jeremias Cushing 

1677. 

Thomas Cheever. m r 
Johannes Danforth. m r Socius. 
Edvardus Payson. m r 
Samuel Sweetman. 
Josephus Capen. m r 
Thomas Scottow 

1678. 

Johannes Cotton. m r Socius 
Cottonus Mather. m r . Socius. S.T.D. 

GlascuaeSrR. S. 
Grindallus Rawson. m r 
Urianus Oakes. 

1679. 

Jonathan Danforth. m r 
Edvardus Oakes. m r 
Jacobus Ailing. 1 m r 
Thomas Barnard. m r 

1680 

Richardus Martyn 

Johannes Leveret. m r Socius Prseses. 

S.R.S. 
Jacobus Oliver. m r 



Gulielmus Brattle m r Socius. S.R.S. 
Percivallus Green. m r 

1681 

Samuel Mitchel. m r Socius 
Johannes Cotton. m r 
Johannes Hastings. m r 
Noadiah Russel. m r 
Jacobus Peirpont. m r 
Johannes Davie. 
Samuel Russel. m r 
Gulielmus Denison. m r 
Josephus Eliot. m r 

1682 

1683. 

Samuel Danforth. m r 
Johannes Williams. m r 
Gulielmus Williams. m r 



1684. 

Johannes Denison. m r 
Johannes Rogers. m r 
Gurdonus Saltonstall. m r 
Richardus Winseley. 
Samuel Miles. m r Oxonii 
Nehemias Walter. m r Socius. 
Josephus Webb. m r 
Edvardus Thompson. 
Benjamin Rolf. m r 



1685 

Thomas Dudley. m r 
Warhamus Mather. m r 
Nathanael Mather. m r 
Roulandus Cotton. m r 
Henricus Gibbs. m r Socius 
Thomas Berry. m r 
Johannes Whiting m r 
Edvardus Mills. m r 
Johannes Eliot. 
Samuel Shepherd 
Petrus Ruck 



1 Apparently altered from "Alleng. " 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



87 



Isaacus Greenwood 

Johannes White. m r . Socius Thesaura- 

rius 
Jonathan Peirpont. m r Socius 

1686 

Franciscus Wainwright. 
Benjamin Lynde. m r 
Daniel Rogers. m r 
Georgius Phillips. m r 
Robertus Hale. 
Carolus Chauncey. m r 
Nicholaus Morton 



1687 

Johannes Davenport. m r 
Johannes Clark. m r 
Nathanael Rogers. m r 
Jonathan Mitchel. m r 
Daniel Brewer. m r 
Timotheus Stevens. m r 
Nathanael Welsh. 
Josephus Dasset. m r 
Henricus Newman. m r 
Josias Dwight. na^ 
Sethus Shove. m r 

1688 



[104] 



1689 



Jacobus Allen. m r 
Samuel Moodey. m r 
Gulielmus Payne. m r 
Addingtonus Davenport. m r 
Johannes Haynes. 
Gulielmus Partrig. 1 
Richardus Whittingham. m r 
Johannes Emerson. m r 
Johannes Sparhawk. m r 
Benjamin Marston. 
Johannes Eveleth. 
Benjamin Peirpont. m r 
Johannes Hancock. m r 
Thomas Swan. m r 

1690 

Paulus Dudley. m r Socius. S.R.S. 

Samuel Mather. m r 

Johannes Willard. m r 

Daniel Denison 

Johannes Jones. m r 

Josephus Whiting. m r 

Nathanael Clap. m r 

Josephus Belcher. m r 

Nathanael Stone. & 1 - 

Johannes Clark. m r 

Thomas Buckingham «&* 



Samuel Mensfield. m r 

Petrus Burr. m r 

Johannes Selleck. 

Johannes Newmarsh. 2 m r 

Thomas Greenwood. m r 

Benjamin Wadsworth. m r . Socius. 



Thomas Ruggles. m r 
Stephanus Mix. m r 
Edmundus Goffe. m r 
Nicholaus Lynde. 
Benjamin Estabrook. m r 

1691 

Johannes Tyng. m r 
Ebenezer Pemberton. m r Socius 
Thomas Mackarty. m r 
Josephus Lord. m r 
Christophonus Toppan. m r 
Samuel Emery. m r 
Thomas Atkinson. 
Timotheus Edwards. m r 

1692. 

Benjamin Colman. m r . Socius. S.T.D. 

Glascuae 
Zecharias Alden 
Ebenezer White. m r 



1 The first f'r" in this name is interlined. 

2 The fifth letter in this name has been altered. 



88 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Jacobus Townsend 
Johannes Mors. m r 
Caleb Cushing. m r 

1693 

Isaacus Chauncey. m r 
Stephanus Buckingham 
Henricus Flynt. m r Socius. 
Simon Bradstreet. m r 
Johannes Wade. m r 
Nathanael Hodson. 
Penn Townsend 
Nathanael Williams. m r . 
Georgius Denison. 
Johannes Woodward. m r . 
Josephus Baxter. m r 
Gulielmus Veazy. m r Oxonii 
[iVJathaniel Hunting. m r 
[Z?]enjamin Ruggles. m r 
[Gulielmus Grosvenor*] m r 

1694 

Adamus Winthrop. m r 
Johannes Woodbridge. 
Dudleus Woodbridge. 
Eliphalet Adams. m r 
Johannes Savage. 
Johannes Ballantine. m r 
Salmon Treat 
Jabez Fitch. m r Socius. 

1695 

Samuel Vassal. 
Gualterius Price. m r 
Richardus Saltonstal. m r 
Nathanael Saltonstall. m r Socius 
Johannes Hubbard. m r 
Simon Willard. m r 
Habijah Savage. m r 
Oliver Noyes. m r 



Thomas Phips. m r 
Timotheus Lindal. m r 
Jonathan Law. -Ea^ 
Ezekiel Lewis. m r 
Thomas Blowers. m r 
Thomas Little. 
Ephraim Little. m r 
Johannes Perkins. m r 
Jedidias Andrews. m r 
Josephus Smith. 
Johannes Robinson. m r 
Josephus Green. m r 
Josephus Mors. m r 
Nicholaus Webster. 

1696. 
Georgius Vaughan. m r 
Roulandus Cotton. m r M.D. 
Petrus Thacher. m r 
Dudleus Woodbridge. m r 
Jonathan Remington. m r Socius. 
Samuel Whitman. m r 
Samuel Estabrook. 
Andreas Gardner. m r 
Samuel Melyn. m r 

1697 
Elisha Cook. m r 
Antonius Stoddard. m r 
Antonius Stoddard. m r 
Jabez Wakeman 
Nathanael Collins 
Samuel Burr. m r 
Johannes Read. m r 
Samuel Moodey. m r 
Richardus Brown 
Hugo Adams. m r 
Johannes Swift. m r 
Johannes Soutlunayd 
Josephus Coit. 
Josephus Parsons. m r 



105 



1698. 



Thomas Symmes. m r 
Josias Cotton. m r 



Samuel Mather. m r 
Josias Willard. m r . Socius. 
Dudleus Bradstreet. m r 



1 This name has been trimmed off, though the tops of some of the letters are 
visible. 






LIST OP GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



89 



Petrus Cutler. m r 
Johannes Fox. m r 
Nathanael Hubbard. m r 
Samuel Wolcot. m r 
Henricus Swan 
Johannes White. m r 
Josias Torrey. 1 m r 
Oxenbridge Thacher. m r 
Richardus Billing. m r 

1699. 

Jeremias Dummer. m r . D. Phil.Ult. Bat. 

Jonathan Belcher. m r 

Johannes Bulkley. m r 

Edmundus Quincey. m r 

Johannes Taylor. 

Stephanus Hosmer 

Daniel Greenleaf. -m* m r 1726 

Moses Hale 

Franciscus Goodhue. m r . 

Nathanael Eells. M r . 1743 

Samuel Niles M r . 1759 

Josephus Moss. 

1700. 

Johannes Winthrop. m r S.R.S. 
Simon Bradstreet. 
Daniel Hooker 
Johannes Whiting. m r Socius 
Josephus Gerrish. 
Jeremias Wise. m r 
Robertus Breck. m r 
David Deming. m r 
Samuel Hunt. m r 
Johannes Barnard. m r 
Johannes Prentice. m r 
Thomas Banister. m r 
Daniel Dodge. 
Johannes Holman. m r 
Johannes Veazie. m r 

1701 

Georgius Curwin. m r 
Nathanael Oliver. m r 



Johannes Stoddard. m r 

Sampson Stoddard. m r 

Johannes Legg. m r 

Theophilus Cotton. m r 

Amesius Angier. m r 

Thomas Weld. m r 

Timotheus Cutler. m r S.T.D. Oxonii 

et Cantab. 
Nicholaus Fessenden. m r 
Isaacus Bayley. 2 
Israel Loring. m r 
Robertus Eliot. 
Thomas Tufts. m r 
Nicholaus Sever. m r Socius. 
Samuel Wiswal. m r 
Samuel Hinckes 3 
Samuel Woodbridge. m r 
Ephraim Woodbridge. m r 

1702 

Gulielmus Hutchinson. m r 
Ebenezer Mountfort. m r 
Christophorus Christophers. 
Georgius Jaffery. m r 
Gulielmus Burnham. m r 
Sampson Sheaf. m r 
Peleg Wiswal m r 
Johannes Odlin. m r 
Johannes Fiske. m r 
Johannes Bowles. m r 
Benjamin Gamblin. m r 
Samuel Ruggles. m r 
Johannes Gore. m r 

1703 

Spencer Phips. m r 
Jacobus Hale. m r 
Josephus Stevens. m r Socius 
Andreas Palmes. 
Thomas Greaves. m r 
Elijah Danforth. m r 
Nathanael Gookin. m r 
Gulielmus Rawson. m r 
Gulielmus Allen. m r 



1 The fourth letter in this name has been altered. 

2 The fifth letter in this name has been altered. 

3 The letter "c" in this name is interlined. 



90 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Benjamin Choat. m r 
Josephue Metcalf. m r 
Jeremias Easman. 
Johannes Latimer. 
Nathanael Pitcher. m r 

1704 

Gulielmus Dudley. m r 
Johannes Russel. m r 
Samuel Mighil. m r 
Ebenezer White. 

1705 

Johannes Wilson. m r 

Edvardus Holyoke. m r Socius Prceses 

Johannes Patrigg. m r 

Nathanael Clark. m r 

Josephus Hiller. m r 

Gulielmus Williams. m r 

Gershom Rawlins M T 1744 

Johannes Rogers. M T 1744 

Josephus Marsh. m r 

Jonathan Marsh. m r 

David Parsons. m r 

1706 
iEgidius Dyer. m r 
Johannes Gibbins. m r 



Petrus Thacher. m r 
Daniel Baker. m r 
Nathanael Fisher. m r 
Josephus Avery. m r . 
Johannes Avery. m r 1 
Jared Eliot. m r 



1707. 



Josephus Sewal. m r . Socius. S.T.D. 

Glascuae 
Samuel Wigglesworth. m r 
Franciscus Wainwright. m r 
Ebenezer Brenton. m r 
Amesius Cheever. m r 
Thomas Prince. m r 
Johannes Otis. m r 
Timotheus Ruggles. m r 
Nathanael Sargent. m r 
Gulielmus Shurtleff m r 
Joshua Moodey. m r 
Matthaeus Short. m r 
Stephanus Jaques. m r 
Joshua Gardner. m r 
Daniel Lewis. m r 
Ebenezer Devotion. 
[Henricus Rust m 2 ] 



106 



1708. 



David Jeffries. m r 
Ebenezer Thayer. m r 
Josias Oakes. m r 
Samuel Fiske. m r 
Johannes Quincey. m r 
Thomas Robie. m r . Socius. 
Samuel Phillips. m r 
Johannes Tufts. m r 
Eleazer Williams. m r 
Compensantius Wadsworth. m r 
Johannes Webb. m r 
Aaron Porter. m r 
Richardus Talley. 



1709. 

Johannes Wainwright. m r 
Johannes Barnard. m r 
Daniel Ringe. m r 
Johannes Keen. 
Samuel Greenwood. m r 
Benjamin Prescot. m r 
Thomas Hauley. 
Ebenezer Williams. m r 
Samuel Brown. 
Benjamin Shattuck. m r 



1 "Josephus Avery. m r " and "Johannes Avery. m r " are on one line. 

2 This name has been trimmed off, though the tops of a few letters are visible. 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



91 



1710. 

Johannes Denison. m r 

Edvardus Wigglesworth. m r Socius 

S.T.P.Holl. S.T.D. Edinb. 
Petrus Oliver. 
Johannes Cotton. m r 
Johannes Woodbridge. 
Samuel Thompson. m r 
Gulielmus Little. m r 
Obadias Ayer. m r 
Caleb Trowbridge. m r 
Elisha Callendar. m r 
Josephus Adams. m r 
Jacobus Allen. m r 
Josephus Meacham. m r 
Samuel Terry. m r 



Johannes James. m r 

1711. 

Gulielmus Sanford. m r 
Johannes Rogers. m r 
Crescentius Walter. m r 
Johannes Wainwright. m r 
Thomas Cushing. m r 
Josephus Russel. m r 
Johannes Chipman. m r 
Elisha Williams. m r 
Samuel Blake. m r 
Josephus Dorr. m r 
Thomas Cheney. m r 
Timotheus Fales. m r 
Samuel Andrew. m r 

1712. 

Nathanael Appleton. m r Socius. S.T.D. 

Gulielmus Cooper. m r 

Richardus Waldron. m r 

Thomas Berry. m r 

Franciscus Foxcroft. m r 

Eleazer Tyng. m r 

Samuel Phillips. m r 

Johannes Coit. m r 

Petrus Barnes. 



Robartus Stanton. m r 
Jonathan Cushing. m r 
Johannes Stedman. m r 
Petrus Clark. m r 
Johannes Nutting. m r 
Edvardus White. m r 
Nathanael Brown. m r 
Andreas Gardner m r 

1713. 

Hugo Hall. m r 
Thomas Walter. m r 
Stephanus Williams. m r 
Peres Bradford. m r 
Benjamin Crocker. m r 

1714. 

Thomas Foxcroft. m r 
Jonathan Peirpont. m r 
Samuel Thaxter. m r 
Nehemias Hobart. m r 
Samuel Andrews. m r 
Samuel Aspinwall. m r 
Enock Coffin. m r 
Adam Cushing. m r 
Job. Cushing. m r 
Ebenezer Gay. m r . S.T.D. 
Johannes Brown. m r 



Josephus Willard M r 1720 

1715. 

Samuel Danforth. m r 
Samuel Plaisted 
Samuel Checkley. m r 
Benjamin Marston. m r 
Benning 1 Wentworth m r 
Jonathan Dowse. 
Nathanael Sparhawk. m r 
Johannes Thomas. m r 
Calvinus Galpin. 
Ebenezer Peirpont 
Johannes Maylen*. m r 



1 The word "Benjamin," written by President Wadsworth, has been crossed 
out and ?' Benning" substituted for it in a different hand. 



92 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Johannes Gardner. m r 
Thomas Gray. 
Samuel Spear, m 1 
Benjamin Webb. m r 
Johannes Cleverly. m r 
Benjamin Bass. m r 
Nathanael Prentice, m 1 



1716. 

Gulielmus Welsteed. m r Socius 
Joshua Moodey. m r 
Ebenezer Gray. M r 1760 
Samuel Stow. m r 
David Crocker. m r 
Gulielmus Cook. m r 
Jonathan Townsend. m r 
Samuel Payson. m r 

1717. 

Nathanael Rogers. m r 
Gulielmus Waldron. m r 



Johannes Higginson. m r 
Nathanael Cotton. m r 
Jacobus Allen. m r 
Henricus Wise. m r 
Josephus Belcher. m r 
Joshua Gee. m r 
Josephus Emerson. m r 
Solomon Otis. m r 
Johannes Greenwood. m r 
Thomas Paine. m r 
Nathanael Henchman. m r 
Henricus Messenger. m r 
Daniel Perkins. m r 
Daniel Putnam. 
Richardus Hazzen. m r 



Daniel Neal. Mr. 1 



[107 



1718. 



Johannes Eyre. m r 
Benjamin Lynde. m r 
Mitchel Sewal. m r 
Josephus Moodey. m r 
Theodorus Atkinson. m r 
Samuel Moodey. m r 
Edvardus Bridgewater. m r 
Nathan Prince. m r Socius. 
Adino Bulfinch. m r 
Franciscus Cogswell. m r 
Brocklebank Samuel Coffin. 
Thomas Parker. m r 
Daniel Witham. m r 
Benjamin Fessenden. ni r 
Richardus Dana. m r 
Gulielmus Thompson. m r 
Timotheus Minot. m r 
David Turner, m r 
Cornelius Nye. m r 



1719. 

Addingtonus Davenport. m r Oxonii 

Johannes Usher. 

Hezekias Gold. m r 

Thomas Oliver. m r 

Roulandus Cotton. m r 

Warhamus Williams. m r 

Solomon Williams. m r S.T.D. Yal. 

Johannes Hancock. m r 

Johannes Green. m r 

Josephus Bridgham. m r 

Samuel Sherburn. m r 

Ebenezer Robie. m r 

Edvardus Jackson. m r 

Benjamin Gibson. m r 

Andreas Boardman. m r 

Nathan Basset. m r 

Jacobus Bayley. m r 

Theophilus Pickering. m r 

Nathanael Leonard. m r 



1 Thougli written at the bottom of page [106], this name should have been 
written at the bottom of (he first column of page [107], under the year 1720. 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



93 



Daniel Holbrook. m r 
Thomas Fish 
Josephus Stacey. m r 
Robertus Ward. m r 

1720. 

Rosewell Saltonstal. m r 
Johannes Angier. m r 
Howard Wybourn. m r 
Thomas Smith. m r 
Josephus Whipple. m r 
Edmundus Toppan. m r 
Timotheus * White. m r 
Shearjashub Bourn. m r 
Josephus Parsons. m r 
Hull Abbot. m r 
Jacob Eliot. m r 
Samuel Dexter. m r 
Petrus Raynolds. m r 
Sethus Storer. m r 
Josephus Green. m r 
Josephus Gooch. m r 
Richardus Jaques. m r 
Samuel Jenison. m r 
Josephus Stimpson. m r 
Josias Marshall. m r 
Hezra Carpenter. m r 



Experience May hew. m r 
Joocphuo Willard^ m - r 
Judah Monis. m r . 

1721. 

Foster Hutchinson 

Johannes Davenport. m r Socius. 

Josias Winslow. 

Pascal Nelson. m r 

Stephanus Pain. m r 

Nathanael Rogers. m r 

Carolus Chauncey. m r . S.T.D. Edin. 

Ebenezer Pemberton. m r S.T.D. Neo. 

Cces. 
Shephardus Fiske. 2 m r 
Stephanus Sewal. m r . Socius. 



Johannes Wolcot. m r 

Robertus Hale. m r 

Noyes Parris. m r 

Thomas Peirpont. m r 

Pyam Blowers. m r 

Isaacus Greenwood. m r . A 3 M. et P. P. 

Holl. 
Gulielmus Osgood. m r 
Ebenezer Turrell. m r 
Simon Davis. m r 
Samuel Marshal. m r 
Johannes Taylor. m r 
Barnabas Taylor. m r 
Amos Throop. m r 
Johannes Adams. m r 
Thomas Hubbard. m r 
Johannes Lowel. m r 
Samuel Barret m r 
Ebenezer Parkman. m r 
Josephus Champney. m r 
Nathanael Hancock. m r , 
Johannes Wyman. -&*£ 
Nathan Bucknam. m r 
Gulielmus Rand. m r 
Oliverus Peabody. m r 
Jabez Wight m r 
Josephus Richards. 
Johannes Wight. m r 



Benjamin Ruggles. m r 
Gulielmus Brentnal. m r 
Peleg Heath. m r 

1722. 

Gulielmus Brattle. m r 
Edmundus Quincey. m r 
Gulielmus Vaughan. m r 
Richardus Saltonstall. m r 
Johannes Chester. m r 
Richardus Wibird. m r 
Daniel Oliver. m r 
Josias Cotton. m r 
Gulielmus Ellery. m r 
Bezaleel Toppan. m r 



1 A letter before "Timotheus" has been crossed out. 

2 This name has been altered. 
8 Written over another letter. 



94 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Johannes Smith. m r 
Sylvan us White. m r 
Nathanael Hunting. m r 
Josephus Dwight. m r 
Ebenezer Miller. m r Oxonii. 
Thomas Lee. m r 
Johannes Mountfort. m r 
Josephus Bourn. m r 
Ebenezer Gee. 
Edmundus March. m r 
Sethus Sweetser. m r 
Matheus Livermore. m r 



Daniel White. 
Willard Hall. m r 
Isaacus Lincoln. m r 
Thomas Clap. m r 
Moses Hale. m r 
Thomas Frink. m r 
Nathanael Brown 
Gulielmus Newcomb. 
Samuel Jefferds. m r 



1763 Guilielmus Parker 



[108 



1723. 



Middlecott Cook. m r 

Samuel Mather. m r Glascus9. S.T.D. 

Johannes Went worth. m r 

Byfield Lyde. m r 

Benjamin Penhallow 

Samuel Hirst. m r 

Samuel Willard. m r 

Josephus Lynde. m r 

Stephanus Greenleaf. m r 

Johannes Sparhawk. m r 

Habijah Savage. m r 

Johannes Sturges. m r 

Wenslaeus Hobby. m r 

Ward Clark. m r 

Jonathan Frie. 

Pain Winget. m r 

Johannes Tuck. m r 

Habijah Weld. m r 

Thomas Weld. m r 

Lothrop Lewis. m r 

Nathanael Glover. m r 

Josias Convers. m r 

Thomas Kilby. m r 

Josephus Belcher. m r 

Johannes Wadsworth. m r 

Johannes Gardner. m r 

Hezras Whitmarsh. m r 

Josephus Penniman m r 

Jonathan Mills. m r 

Isaias Lewis. m r 

Johannes Sumner. m r 

Samuel Dunbar m r 



Johannes Owen. m r 
Isaacus Abbot. m r 
Nathanael Morril. m r 
Johannes Callender. m r 
Gulielmus Sheaf m r 
Jacobus Fitsgerald. m r 
Solomon Lombard. m r 
Benjamin Dickinson. 
Andreas Peters. m r 
Gulielmus Bosson. m r 
Josias Dennis. m r 

1724. 

Adamus Winthrop. m r 
Andreas Belcher. m r 
Andreas Oliver. m r 
Israel Chauncey. 
Henricus Phillips. m r 
Johannes Frizell. m r 
Flynt Dwight. 
Josephus Baxter. m r 
Dudlaeus Woodbridge m r 
Thomas Baker. m r 
Johannes Martyn M r 1743 
Benjamin Fitch. m r 
Zabdiel Boylston. m r 
Nicholaus Gilman. m r 
Barnabas Hedge. m r 
Noah Hobart. m r 
Jacobus Osgood. m r 
Jacobus Skinner. m r 
Gulielmus Balch. m r 
Marston Cabbot. m r 






LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



95 



Johannes Cabbot. m r 
Jonathan Bowman. m r 
Phillips Payson. m r 
Ebenezer Holmes. m r 
Simon Tufts. m r 
[Samuel Coolidge m r x ] 
Stephanus Coolidge. m r 3 
Samuel Seabury. m r 
Edvardus Bridge. m r 
Isaacus Billings. m r 
Jacobus Stone. m r 
Zecharias Hicks. m r 
David Hall. m r S.T.D. Dartmo. 
Nathanael Davis. m r 
Gulielmus Jenison. m r 
Josephus Lewis. m r 
Samuel Allis. M r 
Jonathan Neal. m r 
Richardus Pierce. m r 
Josephus Park. m r . 
Benf Franklin M r . 1753 3 

1725. 

Benjamin Brown. m r 
Johannes Tyng. m r 
Edvardus Dowse. 
Daniel Rogers. m r Socius. 
Daniel Rogers. m r 
Samuel Rogers m r 4 
Jacobus Gushing. m r 
Edvardus Hunting. m r 
Johannes Brown. m r 
GuUelmus Hobby. m r 
Christophorus Minot. m r 
Samuel Sturges. m r 
Mather Byles. m r S.T.D Aberd. 
Benjamin Bradstreet. m r 
Thomas Norton. m r 
Nicholaus Bowes. m r 
Edvardus Stacey. m r 
Thomas Diamond. 5 



Ichabod Wiswall. 
Gulielmus Smith. m r 
Josias Smith. m r 
Thomas Goodwin. m r 
Jacobus Pike. m r - 
Samuel Freeman. 
Thomas Clap. m r 
Ammi Ruhamah Cutter. m r 
Josephus Lewes* 
Timotheus Walker. m r 
Thomas Smith. m r 
Johannes Williams. m r 
David Lovel. m r 
Johannes Warren. m r 
Jacobus Varney. m r 
Jacobus Robinson. m r 
Johannes Hovey. m r 
Nathanael White. m r 
Josephus Manning. m r 
Thomas Gill. m r 
Jeremias Chubbuck. m r 
Ebenezer Flegg. m r 
Jeremias Gridley. m r 
Nathan Webb. m r 
Israel Nichols. m r 
Gregorius Baxter. 
Christophorus Seargeant. m r 

1726. 

Simeon Stoddard. m r 
Gulielmus Clark. m r 
Josephus Pynchon. m r 
Gulielmus Willoughby. m r 
Richardus Hall. m r 
Thomas Greaves. m r 
Henricus Gibbs. m r 
Isaacus Lothrop. m r 
Nathan Stone. m r 
Josephus Lord. 
Josephus Green. m r 



1 This name has been trimmed off, though some of the letters are visible. 

2 While still legible, the tops of some of the letters are trimmed off. 
8 The names of Park and Franklin are on the same line. 

4 The names of Daniel Rogers and Samuel Rogers are on the same line. 
6 The letter " a " in this name is interlined. 



96 



COLLEGE BOOK 1 



[109] 

Edvardus Jackson. m r 
Thomas Cheesbrough. m r 
Thomas Pitts. 
Jacobus Bridgham. m r 
Jeremias Condy. m r 
Thomas Goodridge. m r 
Eleazer Allen. m r 
Jonathan Parker. m r 
Daniel D wight. m r 
Jeremias Fisher. m r 
Jedidias Jewet. m r 
Johannes Emerson. m r 
Johannes Marsh. 
Artherton Wales. m r 
Jonathan Stedman. m r 
Thomas Prentice. m r 
Theodorus Coker. m r 
Jonathan Hay ward. m r 
Isaacus Richardson. m r 
Stephanus Huse. m r 

1727. 

Samuel Brown. m r 

Gulielmus Brown. m r 

Thomas Hutchinson. m r LL D Oxon. 

Johannes Fitch. m r 

Eliakim Palmer. m r 

Benjamin Church. m r 

Benjamin Colman. m r 

Belcher Noyes. m r 

Isaacus Winslow. m r 

Israel Williams. m r 

Daniel Brewer. m r 

Jabez Fox. m r 

Johannes Prescot. m r 

Nathan Townsend. m r 

Johannes Moodey. m r 

Benjamin Rolf. m r 

Gulielmus Johnson. m r 

Johannes Stevens. m r 

Nathanael Saltonstall. m r 

Stephanus Parker. m r 

Samuel Palmer. m r 

Thomas Brintnall. m r 



Thomas Jackson. m r 

Ebenezer Hindsdell. m r 

Jonathan Miles. m r 

Belcher Hancock. m r Tut. et Soc. 

Nathanael Newell. m r . 

Jonathan Trumble. m r LL.D Yal et 

Edin. 
Gulielmus Metcalf. m r 
Johannes Cookson. m r 
Solomon Prentice. m r 
Johannes Blunt. m r 
Benjamin Kent. m r 
Ebenezer Wellington. m r 
Stephanus Harris 
Joshua Wood. 
Gulielmus Howlet. 

1728. 

Gulielmus Phips. m r 

Samuel Went worth. m r 

Jonathan Belcher. m r Cantab, et Dub. 

Josias Quincey. m r 

Nathanael Cushing 

Ludovicus Vassall. 

Thomas Wibird. m r 

Simon Bradstreet. m r 

Johannes Rogers. m r 

Johannes Fitch. m r 

Henricus Sherburne M r . 1748. 

Edmund Trowbridge ' M r 

Daniel Peirce. m r 

Grindal Rawson. m r 

Ebenezer Hancock. m r 

Josephus Newmarch. m r 

Nathanael Eells. m r 

Josephus Marsh. m r 

Josephus Wise, m r 

Nathanael Lindall. m r 

Johannes Lovell. m r 

Edmundus Bowman. m r 

Jacobus Chaundler. m r 

Josephus Fish. m r 

Johannes Clark. m r 

Josephus Torrey. m r 



1 President Wadsworth wrote "Gone." This name, though still legible, has 
been erased and V Trowbridge" written over it in a different hand. 



i 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



97 



Johannes Janvrin. m r 
Thaddeus Mason. m r 
Ephraim Little. m r 
Samuel Allen. m r 
Nathanael Harrington. m r 
Othniel Campbell. m r 
Ezekiel Hersy. m r 
Ephraim Spring. m r . 1732 
Johannes Seacomb. m r 
Thomas Lewes. 
Andreas Croswell. 1 m r 
David Stearns. m r 
Prince Hawes. m r 
Josephus Lovett. 
Stephanus Chase. 
Johannes Wales. m r 

1729 

Simon Frost. m r 
Benjamin Walton. 
Richardus Clarke. m r 
Henricus Welsteed. m r 



Nathanael Walter. m r 
Ward Cotton. m r 
Johannes Cushing. m r 
Johannes Loring. m r 
Gulielmus Williams. m r 
David Parsons. m r 1733 
Josephus Lee. m r 
Ephraim Keith. m r 
Abiel Howard. m r 
Job Parker. m r 
Enoch Freeman. m r 
Philemon Robbins. m r 
Samuel Moseley. m r 
Zecharias Hicks. m r 
Johannes Shaw. m r 
Elisaeus Eaton. m r 
Timotheus Brown. m r 
Amos Main. m r 
Solomon Page. 



Samuel Whittlesey. m r 



[110] 



1730. 



Petrus Oliver. m r LL.D. Oxon. 

Eliakim Hutchinson. m r 

Carolus Frost. m r 

Thomas Steel. m r 

Robertus Breck. m r 

Sampson Stoddard. m r 

Johannes Cotton. m r 

Samuel Parsons. m r 

Stephanus Emery. m r 

Stephanus Minot. m r 

Robertus Eliot Gerrish. m r 

Petrus Prescot. m r 

Johannes Barton. m r 

Josephus Mayhew. m r Tutor et Socius 

Samuel Porter. m r 

Samuel Gibson. m r 

Thomas Tyler. m r 

Edvardus Pell. m r 



Caleb Rice. m r 
Jacobus Penniman. m r 
Johannes Sprague. m r 
Jonathan Hastings. m r 
Gualterus Hastings. m r 
Josephus Manning. m r 
Gulielmus Royal. 
Consolantius Carpenter. m r 
Jacobus Diman. m r 
Johannes Dennis. m r 
Josias Edson. m r 
Jeremias Fogg. m r 
Thomas West M r 1759 8 
Lemuel Trott. 
Adamus Richardson. m r 
Jabez Richardson. m r 
Phineas Heme way. m r 
Nathanael Whitaker. m r 



1 This name was originally "Cr well," the third and fourth letters being 
illegible. It was then crossed out and above it written "Croswell." 

2 This entry is interlined. 



98 



COLLEGE BOOK 



1731. 

Chambers Russell. m r 

Jacobus Pitts. m r 

Johannes Sparhawk. m r 

Nathanael Gookin. m r 

Otis Little. m r 

Elisaeus Odlin. m r 

Samuel Niles. m r 

Nathan Mayhew. 

Samuel Cary. m r 

Johannes Avery. m r 

Ephraim Avery. m r 

Stephanus Sewall. m r 

Benjamin Woodbridge. m r 

Josephus Cushing. m r 

Samuel Stacey. m r 

Henricus Hale. m r 

David Goddard. m r 

Jahakobus Bacon. m r 

Jacobus Fowle. m r 

Hezekias Man. m r 

Supply Clap m r 

Thomas Marsh. m r Tutor et Socius 

Jacobus Lewes 

Gulielmus Skinner. m r 

Josephus Kent. m r 

Ebenezer Wyman. m r 

Edvardus Billing. m r 

Samuel White. m r 

Samuel Bacheller. m r 

Perley Howe 

Johannes Wood. m r 

Samuel Kendall. m r 

Josephus Burbean. m r 

Josephus Seccomb. m r 

1732. 

Johannes Winthrop. m r S.R.S. Math. 

& Phil. Pr. Hollis. Socius 
Johannes Vassall. m r 
Johannes Cutler. m r 
David Jeffreys. m r 
Nathanael Hubbard. m r 
Elijah Williams. M r . 1758 
Johannes Rogers. m r 
Thomas Barnard. m r 



Timotheus Ruggles 
Jacobus Pemberton. m r 
Samuel Gardner. m r 
Johannes Ellery. m r 
Jacobus Morris. 
Josephus Gardner. m r 
Thomas Tufts. m r 
Mather Withington 
Josephus Herrick. m r 
Nicholaus Loring. m r 
Johannes Fowle. m r 
Johannes Fairfield M r 
Ebenezer Hartshorn M r 1737 
Eleazar Hudson. m r 
Thomas Rand. m r 
Nathanael Merril. m r 
Thomas Skinner. m r 
Sampson Spaulding.i m r 
David Co well. m r 



Daniel Bliss mr. 1738 

1733. 

Gulielmus Lynde 
Gulielmus Vassell M r . 1743 
Samuel Sewall. m r 
Christophorus Bridge. m r 
Jahakobus Wendell. m r 
Nathanael Oliver. m r 
Johannes Wilson 
Johannes Swift. m r 
Edvardus Eells. m r 
David Gorham. m r 
Thomas Ward. m r 
Roulandus Thacher. m r 
Samuel Gerrish. m r 
Benjamin Gerrish. m r 
Ephraim Flint. m r 
Gulielmus Tyler. m r 
Ezekiel Cheever. m r 
Samuel Tyley. m r 
Petrus Coffin. m r 
Johannes Noyes. m r 
Timotheus Symonds. m r 
Josias Swan. m r 
Edmundus Freeman. m r 



Altered from "Spauldeng." 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



99 



[111] 

Samuel Tobey. m r 
Josephus Sylvester. m r 
Josephus Orne. m r 
Jedidias Adams. m r 
Sethus Adams. 
Josephus Cleverly. m r 
Elias Haven. m r 
Ebenezer White. m r 
Benjamin Bowers. m r 
Enock Parker. m r 
Jonathan Jackson. 
Henricus Gary. M r 
Thomas Balch. m r 
Jacobus Scales. 
Johannes Osgood. m r l 

July. 5. 1734. 

Elisseus Hutchinson. M r 
Johannes Wainwright. 
Timotheus Cutler. M r 
Johannes Walley. M r 
Georgius Ball. 
Benjamin Gambling M r 
Daniel Lewis. M r 
Samuel Phillips. M r 
Fobes Little. M r 
Johannes Hunt. M r 
Nathanael Perkins. M r 
Nathanael Bethune M r 
Ellis Gray. M r 
Johannes Stewart. M r 
Nathanael Little. 
Johannes Hunt M r 
Gulielmus Gibbs. M r 
Aaron Whittemore. M r 
Richardus Rand. 
Edvardus Upham. M r 
Josephus Crocker. M r 
Moses Hale. M r 
Phinehas Stevens. M r 
Samuel Nightingale. M r 
Parker Mors. 



Johannes Guild 
Samuel Holbrook M r 

July. 4. 1735. 

Gillam Tailer. M r 
Samuel Curwin. M r 
George Curwin. M r 
John Ballantine. M r 
Daniel Russel. M r 
Ezekiel Lewis. m r 
William Bowdoin. m r 
William Foye. M r 
John Watson. M r 
William Parsons. M r 
John Phillips M r L L.D Dart. 
Mesheck Wear. M r 
Eliakim Willis M r 
Samson Sheaf. M r 
Anthony Davis. M r 
Joseph Lemmon. M r 
Wilham Woodberry. M r 
John Osborn. M r 
Samuel Swift. M r 
Aaron Smith. M r 
Noah Clap. M r 
Richard Patteshal. M r 
Samuel Cook. M r 
Edward Durant. M r . 1748 
William Russel. M r 
John Bunker. M r 
Josiah Peirce M r 
Samuel Chaundler. M r 
Solomon Townsend. M r 
Josiah Brown. M r 
Joseph Snell M r 
Aaron Cleaveland. M r 
Ivory Hovey M r 
Joshua Eaton. 
Oliver Fletcher. M r 
Samuel Hill. M r 
Samuel Burnal. M r 
Joseph Underwood. M r 



1 President Wadsworth's list, as copied from the Catalogue printed in 1733, 
must have stopped at this point ; but the remainder of page [111] of the text is 
in the hand of Wadsworth, with the exceptions noted. 



100 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



July. 7. 1736 

Edward Winsolow. M r 
Jonathan Remington 
George Jaffreys. M r 
Francis Hutchinson M r 
Norton Quincey. M r 
Jeremiah Wheelwright M r 
John Phillips. M r 
Benjamin Prescot M r 
Joshua Tuffts M r 
Edward Barnard M r 
Edward Archibald. M r 
David Jewet. M r 
Henry Down 



Grant Webster M r 
Zoheth Smith M r 
John Burt M r 
Ebenezer Bridge M T 
Abner Bay lie M r 
Anthony Emery 
Josiah Brown. M r 
Enoch Ward. M r 
Bellami Bos worth M T 
Moses Parsons M r 
Pouning Bridgham M r 
Samuel Veazy M r 
John Porter M r 
Daniel Wilkin. » M r 17 U 



[112 



July 6. 1737." 



Petrus Oliver M r 

Johannes Eliot 

Petrus Thatcher M r 

Josephus Osgood M r 

Stephanus Fessenden M r 

Edvardus Cheever M r 

Jonathan Winchester M r 

Samuel Webster M r S.T.D. 

Benjamin Parker M r 

Andreas Eliot M r Socius S.TD. Edin. 

Elias Parkman M r 

Andreas Boardman M r 

Johannes Sprague M r M.D. 

Guilielmus Fessenden M r 1741 

Abrahamus Hill M r 

Jacobus Halsy 

Samuel Cobb 

Ebenezer Gay M r S.T.D. 

Josias Lewis M r 

Timotheus Harrington M r 

Josephus Deming 

Johannes Bass. M r 

Ebenezer Morse M r 



Isaacus Morrill M r 
Moses Morrill M r 
Moses Emerson M r 
Abiel Abbot 
Jonathan Ellis 
David Bucknam M r 
Nathan Haven 
Thomas Goss M r 
Josephus Lunt M r 
Aaron Whitney M r 
Benjamin Pratt. M r 



Samuel Steele M r . 1743. 

July. 5. 1738 

Henricus Sewall M r 
Richardus Waldron M r 
Oxenbridge Thacher M T 
Benjamin White M T 
Jonathan Loring M r 
Woodbridge Odlin M r 
Nathanael Rogers M r 
Nathanael Rust 



1 President Wadsworth's list ends with this name. 

2 The list of names from 1737 to 1768, inclusive, is in the hand of President 
Holyoke. 






LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



101 



Johannes Chipman M r 
Samuel Watts M r 1742 
Isaacus Otis M r 
Guilielmus Downe M r 
Andreas Tyler M r 
Johannes Checkley M r 
Edvardus Eveleth M r 
Daniel Staniford M r 
Richardus Mower M r 
Josias Crocker M r 
Benjamin Adams M r 
Jonathan Hellyer M r 
Jonathan Perkins M r 
Elizaeus Marsh M r 
Jonathan Davis M r 
Joshua Prentice M r 
Josias Chase M r 
Thomas Weld 
Philippus Curtis M r 
Johannes Druce M r 
Carolus Gleason M r 
Jacobus Holt M r 
Stephanus Child M r 
David Robinson M r 
Edvardus Bates 

July. 4. 1739 

Woodbury Osborne M r 
Johannes Rogers M r 
Guilielmus Oliver M r 
Samuel Greenwood M r 
Edvardus Brattle Oliver M' 
Richardus Watts M r 



Benjamin Woods M r 
Petrus Clarke M r 
Elisaeus Niles M r 
Josephus Buckminster M r 
Lemuel Bryant M r . 
Richardus Downing 
Dudlseus Leavitt M r 
Job Palmer M r 
Nathan Hale M r 
Nathaniel Gardner M r 
Ebenezer Putnam M r 
Richardus Salter M r S.T.D Yd. 
Adamus Collson M r 
Thaddaeus Maccarty M r 
Gulielmus Vinal M r 
Daniel Emerson M r 
Isaacus Parker M r 
Daniel Farnam M r 
Mathaeus Cushing M r 
Jonathan Kent M r 
Stephanus Frost M r 
Nicolaus Hodge M r 
Josephus Holt M r 
Caleb Swan M r 
Nathanael Sumner M r 
Solomon Reed M r . 

Aug. 27. 1740 

Thomas Prince M r Prince 
Benj a Stevens M r S.T.D. 
Samuel Gay M r 
Georgius Bethune M r 



[113] 

Samuel Adams M r LL.D. 
Isaacus Hinckley M r 1747 
Johannes Gibbins M r 
Samuel Downe M r 
Samuel White M r 
Samuel Orne M r 
Johannes Newman M r 
Samuel Hendley M r 
Jonathan Hoar M r 
Samuel Hale M r 
Eliab Byram 



Benjamin Willis 
Nathaniel Snell Af 
Samuel Langdon M r 

Prceses 
Jacobus Hovey M r 
Josephus Davis M r 
Amarias Frost M r 
Sylvanus Conant M T 



S.T.D Abred. 



Eliphalet Dyar Mr 1744- LL.D. Yal. 



102 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



July. 1: 1741: 

Burnet William Guilielmus. 

Phips David M r 

Mascarene Johannes M r 

Edvardus Winslow M r 

Johannes Thaxter M T 

Johannes Browne M r 

Samuel White M r 

Jonathan Townsend M r 

Josephus Waldo M T 

Timotheus Prout M r 

[GJulielmus l Blair Townsend M' 
Grindallus Rawson M T . 

Isaias Dunster M r 
Loring Cushing 
Thomas Amory M r 
Nathan Cheever M r 
Josias Torrey M r 
Matthaeus Bridge M r 
Johannes Howland M r 
Johannes Tucker M r S.T.D. 
Thomas Jones M r 
Josephus Roberts M r 
Robertus Cutler M r 
Johannes Mellen M r 
Johannes Willson M r 



Eliphalet Dyer M *. 

1742. July. 7 

Leverettus Hubbard M r 
Johannes Wainwright M r 
Johannes Denison M r 
Samuel Auchmuty M r S.T.D. Ox. 
Georgius Eveleigh M r 
Edvardus Bromfield M r 
Samuel Pemberton M r 
Nathanael Hatch M r 
Benjamin Brandon M r 
Samuel Breck M r 
Jacobus Allen M r 
Harperus Hall 
Andreas Burley M r 



Johannes Cames M r 
Benjamin Toppan M T 
Josephus Roby M r 
Gulielmus Rand M T 
Josephus Adams 
Isaacus Mansfield M r 
Stephanus Longfellow M r 
Enoch 2 Bailey M r 
Adamus Bullard M r 
Barachias Mason M T 
Nathanael Trask M r 



Henricus 3 Hans Hansen M r 
Samuel Fitch M r &G6- 1766 

1743. July. 6. 

Foster Hutchinson M r 

Andreas * Pepperrell M r 

Samuel Cooper M r Soc. S.T.D. Ed. 

Gulielmus Pynchon M r 

Samuel Checkley M T 

Johannes Usher M r 

Samuel Thaxter M r 

Lothrop Russell 

Shear jashub Bourne M r 

Guilielmus Bourne M r 

Jacobus Otis M r 

Gulielmus Charnock 

Royall Tyler M r 

Samuel Waldo M r 

Samuel Fayrweather M r Oxon et Cant. 

Cottonus Brown M r 

Josephus Emerson M r 

Benjamin Webb M r 1751 

Gulielmus Lawrence 5 M r 

Jacobus Pecker M r 

Johannes Crocker M r 

Johannes Chandler M r 

Jahakobus Tuttle M r 

Samuel Kneeland 

Caleb Hitchcock M r 

Gad Hitchcock M r S.T.D. 

Daniel Shute M r S.T.D. 



1 This name is written over one erased. 

2 The final letter of this word has been altered: it may be "Enoch" 
or "Enock." 

8 Altered from "Henry." 

* This name is written over another name, the "n" being interlined. 

B Apparently altered from "Laurence." 









LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



103 



[114] 

Elizaeus Savel M r 
Elizaeus Toby 
Paulus Burbean » M r 
Jabez Porter M r 1747. 
-gagrael- Filcli ?vl r 176 2- 



Eliphalet Williams M r 1771 S.T.D. YdU 

1744. Jul. 4. 

Samuel Welles Mr 

Antonius Lechmere 

Johannes Vanhorne 

Thomas Cushing M r Soc. LL.D. 

Thomas Brinley M r 

Isaacus Bowles M r 

Joshua Gee M r 

Jonathan Mayhew M r S.T.D. Aberd. 

Simon Tufts M r 

Carolus Pierce M r 

Johannes Wingate M r 

Benjamin White M r 

Nathanael Coffin M r 

Johannes Lewis M r 

Ebenezer Winchester M r 

Abramus Williams M r 

Nathanael Tucker 

Edvardus Bass M r S.T.D. Phila. 

Josephus Swain M r 

Caleb Upham M r 

Guilielmus Whitmore M r 

Isaacus Osgood M r 

Jedidias Forster M r 

Petrus Frye M r 

Jacobus Humphreys M r 

Guilielmus Kneeland 

Johannes Annable M r 

Jahakobus Green 

Jacobus Welman M r 

Nathanael Bourne. 



Guilielmus-Samuel Johnson M r LL.D. 

Oxon. 
Richardus Cranch M r 1780 



1745. Jul. 3. 

Arnoldus Welles M r 
Jacobus Bowdoin M r 
Ichabod Blaisted M r 
Gulielmus Sever M r 
Andreas Higginson 
Jacobus Warren M r 
Oliverus Peabody M r 
Josephus Adams M r 
Johannes Smith M r 
Gulielmus Davis M r 
Thomas Downe M r 
Johannes Phillips M r 
Johannes Wheelwright M r 
Josephus Storer M r 
Johannes Storer M r 
Nathanael Dummer 
Samuel Wood 1749 M r 
Nathanael Ropes M r 
Thomas Forster M r 1751 
Johannes Adams 
Samuel Turell Mr 
Daniel Pond M r 
Elizaeus Harding M r 
Nehemias Porter M r 



Thomas-Brand Hollis LL.D. 1787 



July 2. 1746 

Daniel Foxcroft M r 

Edvardus Augustus 2 Holyoke M r 

Edvardus Cushing M r 

Nathaniel Gilman M r 

Samuel Moody M r 

Thomas Bulfinch M r 

Josephus Green M r 

Benjamin Fessenden 

Samuel Gardner 

Benjamin Dearborn M r 

Jacobus Putnam M r 

Guilielmus Phips 1750 M r 



1 Altered from "Burbeen." 
a "Augustus" is interlined. 



104 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Ezra Stiles M r 1754 S.T.D. Edin. 
LL.D. Neo Cae 

Daniel Little M r 1766 
Robertus Itogerson M r 1765 

July. 1. 1747 

Johannes Mice- Wendell M r 
Franciscus Waldo M r 
Petrus Bours M 
Benjamin Ellery M r 
Guilielmus Ellery M r 



Pitts Hall M r 
Josephus Gooch 
Johannes Erving M r 
Antonius Wibird M r 
Solomon Williams M r 
Johannes Cotton M T 
Nathanael Henchman M r 
Ebenezer Adams M T 
Foxwell-Curtis Cutt 
Timotheus Minot M r 



[115 



Guli e lmu s Davia 
Thoma s Duwntr 
Johannes Hurd M r 
Ebenezer Storer M r Thesau. 
Johannes Fowle M r 
Dorby Jonathan Mr 

2 1 

Isaacus Gardner M r 
Nyott Doubt 
Peaslee Collins M r 
Johannes-Heard Bartlett 

Edmundus Noyes M r 
Josephus Palmer M r 
Silas Downer M r 
Nathanael Robbins M r 
Peaslee Collins - 
Stephanus Badger M r 

Aloxando r Cummg M r 176t 



Benjamm^W^est-M* 
Granville Sharp LL.D. 1788. 
Samuel Langdon M r 1792 
Johannes Cuming M r 1771. 
Alexander Cuming M r 1761 
Aaron Hutchinson M r 
Benjamin West M r 1771 
Jacobus Lloyd M.D. 1790 



1748 

Edvardus Hutchinson. M r 
Dudlseus Atkins. M r 
Georgius Leonard. M r 
Carolus Chauncy. M r 
Timotheus Pain. M r 
Artemas Ward. M r 
Josephus Adams. M r 
Jahakobus Cushing. M r 
Ward Browne. 
Gulielmus Cook. M r 
Jonathan Sewall. M r 
Richardus Perkins. M r 
Gulielmus Baldwin. M r 
Perez Marsh. M r 
Thomas Sanders. M r 
Samuel Angier. M r 
Josephus Henshaw M r 1752 
Samuel Woodward. M r 
Josephus Bean. M r 
Johannes Rand. M r 
Thomas Hibbert. M r 
Jacobus Hobbs. M r 
Samuel French. 
Georgius Lesslie M r 



Guilielmus Johnson M T 1753 Oxon & 
Cant. 



1 Over the name of Aaron Hutchinson is attached to the page by sealing wax 
a slip containing the seven names printed in italics immediately below the name 
of Benjamin West. 






LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



105 






Jonathan Fitch M r 1754. 
Johannes Hotchkiss M r 1765 
Naphtali Dagget M r 1771 S.TP Yal 
S.T.D. Neo Cces 

1749 

Guilielmus Whipple 
Andreas Oliver M r 
Edvardus Wigglesworth M r S.T.D. 

Tutor. Socius. S.T.P Hollis 
Nathanael Appleton M T 
Benjamin Marston M r 
Johannes Sever M r 
Johannes Cotton M r 
Cottonus Tufts M r M.D 
Robertus Treat Pain M r 
Johannes Wis wall M r 
Joshua Green M r 
Samuel Brooks M r 
Guilielmus Tidmarsh M r 
Gideon Richardson M r 
Nathan Tisdale 
Samuel Haven M r S.T.D. Edin. & 

Dart. 
Josephus Wilson 
Abijah Thurston 
Timotheus Pond M r 
Ezekiel Dodge M r 
Israel Cheever M r 1753 
Oliverus Meriam 

[ V 

Samuel Ko pklns-M^ 
^ avid Riple y 



- Gideon Hawloy 2 -M J 
Johannc3 Hotchkiss M r 17G5 
Samuel Hopkins M r 1754 
David Ripley M r 1754 
Gideon Hawley M r 1763 
Georgius Washington LL.D 1776 
Horatius Gates LL.D 1779 
Benjamin Lincoln M r 1780 

1750 

Thomas Dudley. M r 
Thomas Cheever. M r 
Nathaniel Cotton M r 
Oliverus Prescott M r M. D. 
Robertus Gibbs M r 
Johannes Wendell M r 
Henricus Gardner M r 
Nath 1 Peaslee Seargeant M r 
Johannes Sturgis 
Elitzur Holyoke M r 
Samuel Jordan 
Benjamin Clarke M r 
Guilielmus Symmes M r Tutor 
Samuel Hill 
Henricus True M r 
Hezekias Coolidge M r 
Eliza3us Fish M r 
Elijah Packard M r 
Johannes Ellis M r 

1751. 

Josephus Dudley. M r 
Richardus Saltonstall M r 



[116] 

Samuel Epes. M r 
Guilielmus Cushing M r LL.D. 
Benjamin Greenleaf M r 
Johannes Holyoke 
NathLRay Thomas M r 



Josephus Wanton M r 
Guilielmus Watson M r 
Mather Byles M r S.T.D. Oxon, 
Johannes Willard M r 
Johannes Russell 



1 Several names have been crossed out and over them is attached to the page 
by sealing wax a slip containing the six names printed in italics immediately 
below. 

2 This name is written over " Nathaniel Potter 1758." 



106 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Guilielmus Williams M r 
Johannes Williams 
Josephus Blaney M r 
Benjamin Gridley M r 
Guilielmus Parker M r 
Stephanus Minot M r 
iEgidius-Crouch Kellogg. M r 
Johannes White M T 
Johannes Fe very ear. M r 
Josias Stearns. M r 
Jonathan Kidder M r 
Guilielmus Kneeland M r Tutor 
David Mitchel M r 
Samuel Whittemore M r 
Jonathan Vinal M r 
Moses Taft M r 
Eli Forbush M r 
Georgius Farrar M r 
Johannes Munroe M r 
Thomas Langrell 
Johannes Morse M r 
Josephus Manning. M T 
Alexander M c Dowell 



Jonathan Welles M r 1756 

Sethus Norton M r 1756 

Samuel Macclintoc M r 1761 S.T.D. 

N.C. 
Gulielmus Gordon M r 1772 S.T.D. 

N.C. 

1752. 

Josephus Gerrish 
Edmundus Quincy M r 
Abel Willard M ' 
Thomas Mallbone 
Josephus dishing M r 
Samuel Wiggles worth M r 
Georgius Minot 
Josephus Dorr M r 
Aaron Putnam M r 
Johannes Miller M r 
Thomas Browne M r 
Josephus Parsons M r 
Dummer Jewit M r 
Amos Adams M r 
Guilielmus Foster M r 



Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter M r M.D. 

Samuel Baldwin. M r 

Josua Bracket. M r 

Ephraimus Langdon M r 

David Barnes M r 

Jonathan Eames M r 

Ebenezer Thompson 

Jonaa Carolus l Turner M r 

Jonas Clarke M r 

Azarias Faxon M r 

Benjamin Butler M r 

Asaphus Rice M r 

Josias Bailey M r 

Josephus Perrj' M r 

Cornelius Jones M r 1771 



Petrus Livius M r 1767 

Coesar Anne de la Luzerne LL.D 1781, 

Arthur Lee LL.D 1781. 

1753. 

Oliverus Wendell M r Socius 
Pelhamus Winslow. M r 
Jahakobus Quincy. M r 
Guilielmus Erving. M r 
Thomas Oliver. M r 
Petrus-Thatcher Smith. M r 
Edvardus-Perkins Sparhawk M r 
Josephus Jackson M r Tutor 
David Jenner. 
David Lane. M r 
Jacobus Dana M r S.T.D. Edin. 
Ebenezer Thayer M r Tutor 
Johannes Lowell. M r 
Benjamin Kimbell. M r 
Jonas Meriam. M r . 1757. 
Solomon Park. 
Elias Smith M r 



Nathaniel Potter 1758 M r 
Sethus Pomroy M r 1756 

1754. 

Henricus Dwight 
Samuel Foxroft M r 



Written over "Clarke," partly erased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642~1795 



107 



Samuel Quincy M r 
Jonathan Webb M r 
Johannes Hancock M r LL.D. et Col 

Ins R Thesau 
Guilielmus Warner M r 
Bela Lincoln M r M.D. Aber. 



Phillips Payson M f 
Benjamin Church M r 
Samuel Marshall M r 
Daniel Tread well M r 
Nathan Webb M r 
Jacobus Allen M r 



[117] 



Nathan Fisk M r S T.D. 
Jason Haven M r 
Jahakobus Foster M r 
Petrus Powers M r 1758 
Guilielmus Patten M r 
Samuel West M r S.T.D. 
Hezra Thayer. M r 



Josias Goodhue M r 
Jahakobus Bailey M r 



Jacobus Greaton M r 1760 
Josias Sherman M r 1758 
Carolus Stockbridge M.D. 1793 

1755. 

Carolus Cushing M r 

Henricus Appelton M r 

Guilielmus Browne M r 

Philippus Livingstone 

Johannes Wentworth. M r LL D. Oxon. 

et Aberd. et Dart. 
Jonathan Bowman M r 
Franciscus Gardner M r 
Jahakobus Eliot M r 
Josephus Stockbridge M r 
David Sewall M r 
Tristramus Dalton M r 
Thomas Sparhawk M r 
Guilielmus Whittemore M r 
Johannes Adams M r LL.D. et Dart. 
Samuel Dana M r 
Willardus Wheeler M r 
Stephanus Farrar M r 
Samuel Locke M r S.T.D. Praeses 
Robie Morrill M r 
Nahumus Marshall M r 
Moses Hemenway M r S.T.D. 
Nathan Kidder 



-^athasi el Potter M r l -f58- 
Johannes Gardiner M r Glas. 1791. 

Guilielmus Crawford M r 1761. 
Nathanael Rogers M r 1762 



1756 

Nathanael Lothrop M r 

Josephus Trumble M r 

Samuel Miller 

Guilielmus Checkley M r 

Johannes Hill. 

Guilielmus Hill M r 

Guilielmus Walter M r S.T.D. Aberd. 

Timotheus Walker M r 

Jacobus Lovell M T 

Henricus Hill M r 

Sam 1 Holden Parsons M r 

Jonathan Hayward M r 

Micajah Sawyer M r M.D. 

Bartlet LeBaron M r 

Ephraimus Otis. M r 

Eleazer Weld M r 1761 

Nathan Prentice 

Abiel Forster M r 

Ebenezer Sparhawk M r 

Josephus Sluman M r 

Jahakobus Emerson M r 

Thomas Rice M r 

Ezra Thompson M r 

Stephanus Shattuck M r 

Georgius Daman M r 



108 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Chandler Robbins M r 1760 S.TD.. 

Ed in et Dar 
Timotheus Danielson M r 1779. 
Andrcao Rowland M r 1761 
Alexander Cuming M r 1761 
- Timothouo Jonoo W -tiM- 

-S amuol Stilman M r 1761 

1757. 

Atkinson Theodorus M r 
Vassall Johannes M r 
Appelton Johannes M r 
Georgius Erving M r 1762 Glas 
Russell Carolus M r M.D. Aber. 
Petrus Livingston M r 1779 
Pitts Johannes Mr 
Chardon Petrus 1 M r 
Allen Jonathan M T 
Gilman Tristram M r 1761 
Toppan Thomas 
Brooks Edvardus M r 
Haven Johannes M r 
Walker Edvardus M r 
Barret Samuel M r 
Williams Thomas M r 
Pecker Jeremias M r 1761 



Fairfield Johannes M r 1761 
Phips Thomas M r 
Bradbury Theopliilus M r 
Pike Guilielmus 2 M r 
Tuttle Samuel M r 1763 
Tuttle Sampson M r 1763 
Parker Jedidias M r 
Holt Nathan M r 
Wheeler. Josephus M r 



Chandler Robbins M r 
Samuel StUlman M r 1761. S.T.D. Col. 
Ins. R 

[ ] 

Hall Jackson M. D. 1793 
Timotheus Jones M r 1761 
Andreas Rowland M r 1761 
Edmundus Fanning M r 1764 
Stephanus Sayre M r 1766 
Caleb Barnum M r 1768 

1758 

Johannes Foxcroft. M r 
Samuel Danforth. M r M.D. 
Thomas Hutchinson M r 
Daniel Oliver M r 
Thomas Went worth M r 



[118] 

Daniel Epes. M r 

Samuel Moffatt. M r 

Leonard Williams M r 

Samuel Frink M r 

Joshua Wingate Weeks. M r 

Johannes Tucke M r 

Guilielmus Russell M r 

Oakes Shaw M r 

Samuel Payson M r 

David Wyer M r 

Isaacus Foster M r 

Aaron Hall M r 

Simeon Howard M r Tutor et Socius 

S.TD Ed in 
Daniel Noyes M r 



Petrus Russell M r 
Amos Toppan M r 
Gulielmus Perkins M r 
Thomas Fessenden M r 
Josias Bridge M r 
Josephus How M r 
Job Wlutney 
Rolandus Green M r 
Josephus Pearson M r 
Johannes Tread well M r 
Eliab Stone M r - 
Samuel Dix M r - 



-C aroluo Gordon - M^ 1762 
Gulielmus Whitwell M T 1762 



1 Altered from "Peter." 

2 "Guilielmus" b written over a word erased. 






LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



109 



Zephanias Leonard M r 1763 
Gulielmus Tennent M r 1763 
Johannes Sullivan M r 1780 LL.D. 
Dart. 

1759 

Jonathan Trumble M r 

Samuel Allyne Otis M f 

Benjamin Pickman M r 

Edmundus Dana M r 

Samuel Cotton M r 

Gulielmus Clarke M r 

Abiel Leonard M r S.T.D. Neo. Cass. 

Paine Wingate M r 

Thomas Welles White M r 

Johannes Avery M r 

Paulus Coffin M r 

Carolus Coffin M r 

Samuel Gardner 

Daniel Jones M r 

Edvardus Church M r 

Johannes Gorham 1 

Nathan Da vies M r 

Johannes Pickering M r 

Justinus Ely. M r 

Samuel Fisk M r 

Lemuel Hedge M r 

Micah Lawrence M r 

Moses Putnam M r 

Nathan Goodale M r 

Josephus Warren M r 

Benjamin Hobbs 

Ebenezer Taylor 

Amos Moody 

Samuel Kingsbury M r 

Johannes Whittier M r 

Phineas Whitney M r 

Zabdiel Adams M r 

Daniel Stimpson M r 

Gyles Merrill. M r 

Edvardus Russell M r 



[ I 2 

■Ecem4eu 3 Marchant 



- Guiliolmuo Whitwcll - 

Nathani c l Rogers 

J oh. Groenougk - 

- Mat. Mcriam 

Ephraim - Hid e ■ 

Carolus Gordon M r 1762 Abrd. 

Henricus Marchant M r 1762 LL.D. 

Yal. 
Johannes 3 Greenough M r 1763 
Ebenezer Grosvenor M r 1763 
Ephraimus Hide M r 1763 
Johannes Huntington M r 1763 
Matthceus Meriam M r 1765 
Ebenezer Crafts M r 1784 
Josua Toulmin S.T.D. 1794. 

1760 

Thomas Brattle M r 

Daniel Leonard M r 

Ebenezer Hancock M r 

Ludovicus Vassall M r 

Johannes Hall M r 

Johannes Lowell M r LL.D. Socius 

Guilielmus Hooper M r 

Elijah Dunbar M r 

Johannes Warren M r 

Daniel Bliss. M r 

Josias Crocker M r 

Ebenezer Williams M r 

Bunker Gay M r 

Nathaniel Wells M r 

Williams Bradford M r 

Johannes Wyeth M r 

Guilielmus Baylies M r 

Samuel Dean M r Tutor S.T.D. Col. 

Ins. R 
Josias Clark 
Ephraimus Woolson 
Jacobus Baker M r 
Timotheus Fuller M r 
Jonathan Livermore M r 
Ebenezer Rice 



1 Altered from "Goreham." 

2 Five or six names have here been crossed out and over them has been 
attached to the page by sealing wax a slip containing the nine names printed in 
italics beginning with that of "Carolus Gordon." 

3 Written over a word erased. 



110 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Antipas Steward M r 
Henricus Cumings M r 



[ ]' 

Andrcao S torrG M r 176& 

Matthew Miriam M r 1765 

Andreas Stoors M r 1765 

Samuel Blair M r 1767 S.T.D. PhUa. 



Josephus de Valnais LL.D 1779 
Thomas Jefferson LL.D. 1787 et 

Yal. 
Johannes Haygarth M.D. 1794. 

1761 

Stephanus Hooper M r 
Elisaeus Porter M r 



Col. 



[119] 

Petrus Oliver M r 

Hull Sewall M* 

Samuel Sewall M r 

Thomas Palmer M r 

Edvardus Wiggles worth M r 1766 

Archibaldus Campbell M r 

Guilielmus Emerson M r 

Samuel Williams M r LL.D. Edin et 

Yal. Math, et Phil Nat Prof Hoi. 
Johannes Flagg M r 
Johannes Cushing M r 1765 
Jonathan Jackson M r 
Thomas Cary M r 
Guilielmus Goddard M r 1765 
Samuel West M T 
Theophilus Smith M T 1789 
Isaacus Rand M r 
Johannes Frye M r 1765 
Nathaniel Ames M r 
Moses Badger M r 
Christophorus-Bridge Marsh M r 
Johannes Marsh M r Tutor 
Johannes Bass 
Johannes Farnum M r 
Jonathan Moore M r 
Josias Browne M r 
Adamus Porter M r 
Johannes Pickering M r LL.D. Dartmo 
Josephus Bowman M r 
Daniel Leeds M r 
Thomas Marrett M r 



Jahakobus Emery M r 

Silas Moody M r 

Stephanus Sewall M r 3 Heb. ccetq. 3 Ling. 

Or. Prof. Hancock. 
Jacobus Prentice M r . 
Jonathan Craft 
Johannes Page M r 
Benjamin Caryl. M r 



- Andreas StGrr& -M x -1^5- 
- Samucl B l air - M r 1767 
Gulielmus Southmayd M r 1768 

Johannes Jay LL.D. 1790. 

1762 

Elisaeus Hutchinson. M r 
Thomas Danforth M r Tutor et Socius 
Guilielmus Hutchinson. M r 
Daniel Oliver. M r 
Isaacus Winslow. M r 
Franciscus Dana M r LL.D. 
Johannes New. M r 
Georgius Gardner. M T 
Jeremias Duiner. Rogers M r 
Jonathan Parker. M r 
Benjamin Balch. M r 1767 
Johannes Barnard. M r 
Nathan Stone. M r 

Andreas 4 Eliot M r Biblioth. & Tutor 
et Socius. 



1 Three names have here been crossed out and over them has been attached 
to the page by sealing wax a slip containing the five names printed in italics. 

2 A letter or two is here crossed out. 
' Altered from "caeter." 

i The letter "r" in this name is interlined. 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



111 



Jacobus Messinger. 

Bezaliel Shaw. M r 

Guilielmus Shaw. M T 

Johannes Swift. M r 

Samuel Webster. M r 

Petrus Whitney. M r 

Joshua Atherton. M r 

Israel Atherton. M r 

Jonathan Crane. M r 1766. 

Solomon Phelps. M r 1779. 

Ephraimus Keith. M r 

Elbridge Gerry. M r 

Moses Gerrish. 

Johannes Newman. 

Matthaeus Cuming. 

Thomas Bridgman. M r 

Jeremias Belknap. M r S.T.D. 

Johannes Peck. M r 

Josephus Domett. M r 

Penuel Bowen. M r 

Timotheus Alden. M r 

Phinehas Adams. M r 

Thomas Hill. M r 

Georgius Partridge. M r 

Josephus Stacey Hastings. M r 

Marshall Spring "M^ M r 1766 

Asa Porter. M r 

Peres Fobes M r 1786 LL.D. Col. Ins. R 

Johannes Wadsworth. M T 

Josias Winship. M r 

Ebenezer Champney. 



Isaacus Hasey. M r 
Thomas Allen. M r 



[120] 
Richardus Cary. M r 
Joshua Upham. M r 
Jonathan Bliss. M 
Sampson Salter Blowers. M r 
Johannes Cabot. M r 
Timotheus Pickering. M r 
Ephraimus Ward. M r 
Josias Dana. M r 
Archelaus Putnam. M r 
Tarrant Putnam. M r 
Josephus Brown. M r 
Samuel Porter. M r 
Thomas Gannett. M r 
Caleb Gannett M r Tutor et Socius 



i fohannes Hottkias M r \ 
Mattha>us M o riam M ^ > Yalonooo 
Andr oao Storro M r j 
ilo bo rtus R o g o ro o n -^^^Sg 
Jacobus Sullivan M r 1780 
Johannes-Coakley Lettsom M.D. 1790 
et Edin 

1763. 

Josephus Hooper. M r 
Jedidias Huntington. M r 
Carolus Church Chandler. 
Josias Quincy. M r 
Sampson Stoddard. M r 
Joshua Henshaw. M r 
Nathaniel Noyes. M r 
Samuel Angier. M r 
Nathan Cushing. M r 
Samuel Eaton. M r 
Benjamin Balch. M r 1767 
Stephanus Scales M r Tut r . 
Johannes Jeffries M r M.D. Aber 
Jonathan White. 
Benjamin Dolbeare. M r 
Johannes Hunt. M r 
Nathaniel Fisher. M r 



Samuel Waterman. 
Samuel Perley. M r 
Benjamin Bowen. 
Johannes Marrett. M r 
Nathanael Cooper. M r 1768 
Nehemias Parker. 
Jacobus Parker. 
Jahakobus Coggin. M r 



m- 



Danicl Little ~\ 

Samuel Fitch [■ -[ ] 

Stov o n Sayr o ) 
Johannes Lathrop M r 1768. Socius 
S.T.D Edin 



1 Some words are here undecipherable. 



112 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



1764. 

Franciscus Foxcroft M T 
Thomas Dyar 
Nathaniel Richmond 
Elizaeus Williams M r 
Joshua Orae M r 
Thomas Abbot M r 
Gulielmus Bowman M T 
Johannes Banister M r 
Samuel Parker M r S.T.D. Phila. 
Johannes Scollay. M r 
Johannes Cushing. M r 1769. 
Johannes Emerson M r 
Oakes Angier M r 
Johannes Payson M r 
Stephanus Chase M r 
Samuel Porter M r 1769 
Ebenezer Bridge M r inrS- 
Johannes Wilkins 
Sethus Ames M r 
Ebenezer i Hunt M r 
Johannes 2 Hunt M r 
Benjamin Bourne M r 
Shearjashum Bourne M r 
Thomas Lancaster M r 
Thomas Brigden M r 
Caleb Strong M r 
Abiel Smith M* 1774 
Nehemias Ordway M r 
Nathaniel Paine-Drowne M r 
Sewall Goodridge M r 
Rufus Welles. 
Josias Langdon. M r 
Alexander-Sears Hill. M r 
Gulielmus Aspinwall. M r 
Isaacus Winchester. M r 
Jonathan Goodhue. M r 
Caleb Rice. M r 
Benjamin Brigham. M r 
Edvardus Barnes. 
Edvardus Goddard. 
Timotheus Hilyard. M r Tutor 
Daniel Fogg. M r 
Daniel Fuller. M r 
Jonathan Searle. M r 



Ephraimus Briggs. M r 
Vexillanius Man. 



Pctru3 Liviuo M* 



Josephus Kidder M r 1768 

1765. 

Nathaniel Sparhawk. M r 

Robertus Hooper. M r 

Andreas Oliver. M r 

Johannes Winthrop. M r 

Samuel Sherburne. M r 

Edvardus Winslow. M r 

Vryling Stoddard. M r 

Belcher Noyes. M r 

Guilielmus Fowle. M r 

Johannes Thomas. M r 

Henricus Gardner. M r 

Samuel Hunt. M r 

Samuel Rogers. M r 

Edvardus Parsons. M r 

Johannes Sprague. M r 

Johannes Thompson. M T 

Stephanus Hall. M r Tutor et Socius. 

Lemuel Williams. M r 1778. 

Josephus Willard. M r S.T.D. Tutor 

Socius et Prceses LL.D. Yal 
Johannes White. 
Ezra Green. M r 
Thomas Haven. M T 
Moses Parsons. M r 
Josephus Taylor. M r 
Josephus Orne. M r 
Sethus Williams M r 
Johannes Stedman. 
Ebenezer Stedman.^ 
Nathanael Ward. M r Biblioth. 
Timotheus Langdon. M r 
Franciscus Winter. M r 
Isaias Joscelyn. M r 
Philemon Stacey. M r 
Moses Hubbard. M r 
Samuel Cutler. M r 1769 
Josephus Lee. M r 



Mr 



1 Written over "Johannes," erased. 

2 Written over "Ebenezer," erased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



113 



Caleb Prentice. M r Biblioth. 
Jahakobus Rice. M r 
Jonathan Searle. M r 



Dudlaeius Colman. 
Josias Crocker. M 



Mr 



[121] 

Johannes Page. M r 
Elijah Browne. M r 1769. 
Johannes Eddy. M r 
Andreas Fuller. M r 
Josephus Bailey. M r 
Carolus Curtis. 
Amos Sawyer. M r 
Josephus Willard. M r 
Josephus Penniman. M r 1769 
Josephus Currier. M r 
Nathanael Battle. M r 
Benja Shattuck. M r 
Silas Biglow M r 



- Johannes Hotchkiss M* 
Matths e ua Moriani M r — \ - 1750 - 

Androas Storra M * J-Hm 

-R obcrtuo Rogcro en-^P4 }-H€5- 

Johannes Chester Williams M r 1769 
Simeon Williams M r 1769 
Elijah Fitch M r 1770 
Manasses Cutler M r 1770 LL.D Yal. 
Johannes Bacon M r 1771 
Josephus How M r 1773 
Apollos Leonard M r 1786 1 
Ebenezer Pemberton M r 1787 1 

1766 
Guilielmus Pepperrell. Mr. 
Nathanael Saltonstall. M r 
Guilielmus Pickman. M r - 
Rufus 2 Chandler M r > 
Henricus Gibbs. Mr. 
Johannes Hunt. Mr. 
Johannes Watson. Mr. 
Epes Sargent. 
Josephus Dowse. 
Jonathan-Loring Austin Mr. 



David Cobb. Mr. 

Oliverus Whipple. Mr. 1770. 

Ebenezer Potter. Mr. 

Nicholaus Pike. Mr. 

Thomas Barnard. Mr. S.T.D. Edin. et 

Col. Ins R 
Samuel Morrill. Mr. 
Thomas Prentice. Mr. 
Samuel Curtis. Mr. 
Samuel Savage. M r 1777. 
Carolus Jarvis Mr. 
Benjamin Goodhue Mr. 
Ebenezer Barnard. Mr. 
Samuel Barnard. Mr. 
Benjamin Hammett. Mr. 
Elisseus Whitney. Mr. 
Johannes Hill Mr. 
Petrus Green. 
Jahakobus Ashton. Mr. 
Johannes Stevens. M r - 
Ebenezer Manning. M r - 
Jahakobus Biglow. M r « 
Guilielmus Hall. Mr. 
Nathaniel Lovejoy Mr 1770 
Joshua Fisher. Mr. 
Samuel Hale. M r 
Elijah Putnam. M r 1777 
Joshua Bowman. 
Nathaniel Bond. Mr. 
Johannes Prentice Mr 
Johannes Barrows M r 



Johannes Che s ter William o M^-Y&L 
Simeon Williams M r 1769 - 
Nathanael Niles M r 1772 
Johannes Chester M r 1775 
Loammi Baldwin M r 1785 



1 The names of Apollos Leonard and Ebenezer Pemberton are written on a 
slip attached by sealing wax to the page. 

2 Altered from "Runs." 



114 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



1767. 

Thomas Bernard. M r 

Adamus Winthrop. M r 

Edvardus Oxnard. M r 

Lemuel Cushing. M r 

Samuel Hancock. M r 

Isaacus Mansfield. M r 

Josias Moulton. M r 

Johannes Rogers. M r 

Isaacus Smith. M r Tutor et Biblioth. 

Daniel Johnson. M r 

Simon Tufts. M r 

Gulielmus May hew. M r Biblioth 

Zephanias Briggs. M r 

Elisaeus Thayer. M r 

Henricus Herrick. M r 

Edmundus Freeman. M r 

Burrill Devereux. M r 

Samuel Willard. M r 

Crescentius Sumner. M r 

Nicolaus Dudley. M r 

Abrahamus Wood. M r 

Guilielmus Moore. M r 

Gulielmus Turner. M r 1771 

Jeremias Shaw. M r 

Simeon Chase. M r 



Enos Hitchcock. M r S.T.D Col Ins 

Rhod 
Samuel Cheney. M r 
Asa Dunbar. M r 
Sylvanus Ames. M r 
Timotheus Farrar. 
Josephus Farrar. M r 
Nathaniel Kidder. M r 
Jonathan Frost. M r 
Asarelah Morse. Mr 
Aaron Bordman. M r 
Gulielmus Gamage. M r 
Johannes Porter. 
Amos Cutting. M r 
Moses Holt. M r 
Gulielmus Kelley 
Nathaniel Merrill 
Johannes-Marston Minot 



Petrus de Sales la Terriere M.B. 1789 

1768. 

Rolandus Cushing M r 
Gulielmus Paine M r 
Nathaniel Chandler. M r 
Henricus Sewall. 1 M r 



[122] 

Andreas Henshaw. M r 
Guilielmus Hunt. M r 
David Greene. M r 
Ebenezer Sayer. M r 
Thomas Leonard. 
Jonathan Hastings. M r 
Kenneth M c Kenzie 
Jacobus Diman. M r 
Johannes Wentworth. 
Jeremias Fogg. M r 
Johannes Ballantine. M r 
Gad Hitchcock. M r 
Benjamin West. M r 
Laurentius Sprague. M r 
Timotheus Orne. M r 
Obadias Parsons. M r 



Josephus Thaxter. M r 
Guilielmus Fessenden. M T 
Samuel Hill. 

Johannes Coffin Jones. M r 
Ephraimus Wales. M r 171 % 
Lemuel Hayward. M r 
Samuel Parker. M r 
Isaacus Knowles. M r 
Jonathan Smith. M r 
Aaron Bascom. M r 
David Tenny. M r 
Josephus Cumings. M r 
Timotheus Upham. M r 
Benjamin Hitchborn. M r 
Moses Browne. M r 
Thomas Emery. 



i Apparently altered from "Sewell.' 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



115 



Nathaniel Porter. 1772 M r 
Daniel Newcomb. M r 
Jonathan Gove. M r 
Ebenezer Starr. 
Samuel Nutting. M r 
Guilielmus Keous. M r 1775 



Of othci 



^S3H&* 

College; - 



Guiliclmu3 Southmayd. M r 

Joacphus Kidder. M r & M r John Low- 
th rop t e-be-plaee d in the Catalogue 
-a s wo may find them graduated in 
- their own College s 1 

Johannes Kemp S.T.D. 1792 

Thomas Randall S.T.D. 1792 

1769. Julii 19.2 

Petrus Oliver M r 
Jacobus Winthrop M r Biblioth. 
Johannes Williams M r 
Petrus Thacher M r S.T.D. Edin. 
Josephus Lee M r 
Christophorus Sargeant M r 
Nehemias Williams M r 
Theophilus Parsons M r 
Gulielmus Tudor M r 
Johannes Bulkley M r 
Nathanael Webster M r 
Thomas Kast M r 1774 
Petrus Coffin M r 
Nathanael Tracy M r 
Nathanael Harrington M r 
Isaacus Biglow M r 
Jonathan Williams Austin M r 
Daniel Jones M r 
Jonas Dix M r 
Georgius Wheten 
Alexander Scammell M r 



Gulielmus Bowers M r 
Benjamin Wadsworth M r 
Peleg Wadsworth M r 
Jacobus Blake 
Ebenezer Bradish M r 
Elias Fisher M r 
Benjamin Guild M r 
Thomas Moore M r 
Jahakobus Jewett M r 
Noah Cooke M r 
Guhelmus Goodhue M r 
Elijah Fletcher M r 
Stephanus Peabody M r 
Samuel Whiting 
Benjamin Bradshaw M r 
Samuel Coolidge M r 
David Jewett 
Moses Dow M r 39 



.July-14 1772 R o vd ^P^W^^Gefden-^f 

-M^Niles-A M at Nassau ad eundec ar 
Thomas Melville M r 1773 
De La Fayette Marchio 3 LL.D 1784 

1770. Julii 18 4 

Gulielmus Sanford Hutchinson M r 
Gilbertus Saltonstall M T 
Gulielmus Winthrop M r 
Johannes Winthrop 1774 M r 
Paulus Landgon M r 
Ward Chipman M r 
Jonathan Stearns M r 
Amarias Frost M r 
Johannes Mellen M r Tutor 
Aaron 5 Hutchinson M r 
Jonathan Newell • M r 
Edvardus Sprague M r 
Samuel Adams M r 
Samuel Osgood M r 



1 This is the last entry in the hand of President Holyoke. 

2 The names of those who graduated in 1769 are in an unknown hand. 

3 The word " Marchio " is underscored. 

4 The names from 1770 to 1773, inclusive, are perhaps in the hand of President 
Locke. 

5 Altered from "Aaaron." 

6 Altered from "Newall." 



116 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Josephus Hunt M r 
Zebulon Butler M T 
Jonathan Barns M r 
Abner Smith M r 
Nathan Goddard M r 



Samuel Sheldon Pool M r 
Thomas Colman M r 
Gulielmus Stearns M T 
Benja Chad wick M r 



[123] 

Isaacus Stone M r 
Henricus Bright M r 
David Townsend M r 
Joseph Pope M r 
Palsgrave Wellington M r 
Hezekias Taylor M r 1797 
Jonathan Hicks M r 
Owen Warland M r 
Jahakobus l Burnap M r 
Aaron Crosby M r 
34: Gulielmus Wetmore M % 



Benja- Wcot admi tted- blaster for hon - 

-orar y Dcgroo 
Elijah Fitch M. A , 

A T o n ojm ^ V r^iT flo i* AT A 

Johannes Porter M r 1777 
Georgius Cabot M r 1779 

Julii 17. 1771 

Sam 11 Hirst Sparhawk M r 
Jacobus Bowdoin M r Socius 
Andreas Bradford Mr 
Sam 11 Paine M r 
Edvardus Kitchen Turner 
Gulielmus Vassall 2 M r 
Samuel Phillips M r LL.D 
Daniel Murray M r 
Daniel Rogers 3 M r 
Josephus Emerson M r 
Johannes Alford Mason M r 
David Parsons M r 
Gualterius Hastings M r 
Jahakobus Bacon M r 



Moses Hale M r 

Gulielmus Gay Ballentine 

Gulielmus Vinal 

David Toppan M r S.T.D. S.T.P. 

HoUis 
Sam 11 Plumer M r 
Johannes Barnard Swett 
Johannes White M r 
Winthrop Sargent 
Robertus Roberts 
Josephus Pearse Palmer M T 
Gulielmus Cheever M r 
Greenleaf Dole M r 
Zedekias Sangar M r 
Isaacus Bangs M r 
Johannes Tracy M r 
Joshua Dodge M r 
Johannes Gill 
Ebenezer 4 Putnam 
Daniel Tyler M r 
Josephus Avery M r 
Johannes Frothingham M T 
Michael 6 Joy M r 
David Osgood M r 
Johannes Warren M r M.D. Anat. et 

Chirur. Prof. Hersey 
Crocker Sampson M T 
Sam 11 Nye M r 
Gulielmus Scott M r 
Sam 11 Prentice M r 1776 
Abrahamus Watson M r 
Thomas Edwards M r 
Perez Morton M r 
Jonathan Norwood M r 
Melzar-Turner Oakman M r 



1 Altered from " Jahakcobus." 

2 Altered from "Vassal." 

3 Altered from "Roggers." 

4 Apparently altered from "Ebenezar." 

6 The letter "h" in this name is interlined. 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



117 



Israel Keith M r 

Nathanael Dickenson M r 

Johannes Noyes M r 

Gad Stebbings M r 

Moses Everett M r 

Moses Adams M r 

Samuel Wheeler M r 

Thomas Little 

Amos Windship M r 1790 M.B . 

Benja Curtis M r 

Jonathan French M r 

Moses Johnson 

Jedidias Estabrook 

Ebenezer i Allen M r 1779 



Gulielmus Scales M r 
Benj a Hasey 2 M r 



Rcv^ Nath 1 Applcton created Doctor 
in Divinity 



&ev<^ rc o idcnt Daggct - A M S.T.D. 



,J HS- Prcs. Coll. YaJ r 
- H JgJ JRLal oi: 3SZH 



ipixu , i v; o t vxlliainG - 17^ A M 
Rov^ Cornolius Jono s A M 52 
John Cu naBg-rEs€H--A-Mr4 ^norary 
Josephus Barker M r 1782 
Jeremias HUl M r 1787 
David Humphreys M r 1787 



[124] 

July 15. 1772 

Gulielmus Chandler 
Benja Loring 
Clemens March M r 
Sam 1 Murray 
Johan s Lind 11 Borland 
Jonath. Williams 
Johannes Eliot M r 
Sam 1 Cooke M r 
Sam 1 Ruddock 
Georgius Inman 
Johannes Shaw M r 
Johannes Hastings M r 
Paulus Whitney M r 1782 
Sam 1 Haven M r 
Clemens Weeks M r 
Josephus Crosby 
Tho s Aston Coffin M r 1791 
Phillips White 
Johannes Sprague M r 
Daniel Staniford M r 1777. 
Joshua Bay ley 3 Osgood M r 
Miles Whitworth 
Johannes Simpson 



Johannes Clarke 
Joshua Barker M r 1778 
Nathaniel 4 Ellery 
Joshua Thomas M r 1782 
Johannes Homans 
Edvardus Hill 
Sam 1 Smith M r 
Tho s Burnham M r 
Jesse Rice 

Gulielmus Eustis M r 1784 
Tho s Saunders 
Nathan Bond M r 



Martinus Herrick 

Gulielmus Fisk 

Johannes Hills M r 

Sam 1 Tenny 

Josias Badcock M r 

Daniel Chaplin M r 

Oliverus Wellington e Lane M r 1779 

Beza Hay ward M r 

Phinehas Bowman 

Tho s Welsh 

Levi Lincoln M r 1776 



1 Altered from "Ebenezar." 

2 Altered apparently from "Halsey." 

3 The letter "e" in this name is interlined. 

4 Altered from "Nathanael." 

6 The letters "ton" in this name are interlined. 



118 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Phinehas Wright M r 1785 
Johannes Allen 



Johann e s Bacon M r 17 ?£ 
Johannes Parke M T 1775 
Johannes Brooks M r 1787 
Gulielmus Hull M r 1787 
Jonathan Williams M r 1787 
Samuel Shaw M r 1790 

July 21. 1773 

Nath 1 Walker Appleton M r 
Josua ' Armsby M r 
Moses Bernard M r 
Jeremias 2 Bernard M r 



Eben r Bolt wood 
48 Gul 8 Bradford 

Iaac 3 Bradish M r 1777. 
Gul 9 Caldwell M r 1777 
Steph 8 Crosby M r 
Nahu 3 Cutler 
Josua Eaton M r 
Sam 1 Fales M r 
Tho 8 Farrington M r 
Tho s Flucker 
Sam 1 Henshaw M r 
Martin 8 Leavitt M r 
Johan 8 Low 
Tilly Mirrick M r 
Abner Morgan 
Dan 1 Parker M r 1782 
Warham 9 Parks 



[125] 

Theod 9 Parsons M r 
Oliver Peabody M r 
Elipha 1 Pearson M r Heb. cost. q e . Ling. 

Or. Prof. Hancock LL.D. & Col. Yal. 

et Neo. Cces. 
Josua Plumer 
Tho 9 Prince M r 1778 
Benj : Rice 

Nathan Rice M r 1778 
Eben r Rock wood M r 
Manas. Smith M r 
Carol 8 Stearns M r Tutor 
Jacobus Trecothic M r 
Johan Trumbull 
Abel Whitney Jlf 1777. 
Solom 11 Willard M r 
Rober* Williams 



Samuel Leonard M r 1781 
Royal Flint M r 1786 

Julii 8 15 to 1774.< 

Daniel Adams M r 1778 
Jonathan Allen M r 



Josephus Allen M r 

Fisher Ames M r 

Edvardus Barnard M r 

Franciscus Borland M r J785 

Johannes Bradford M r 

Jabes Chickering M r 

Johannes Clark M r 

Josephus Crocker M r 

Isaias Doane M r 

Timotheus D wight M r 

Richardus Roswell Eliot M r Tutor 

Josephus Emerson M r 

Samuel Emery M r 

Abel Fisk M r 

Gulielmus Fogg M r 

Gulielmus Gallison 

Asahel Goodenow M r 

Josephus Hall M r 

Josephus Haven M r 

Gulielmus Hobart M r 

Gulielmus Jennison 

Samuel Jennison M r 1782. 

Robertus Junkins 

Thomas Loring M r 1778 

Benjamin Lovell 



1 Altered apparently from "Josha." 

s The letters "ias" in this name are interlined. 

3 Altered from "Julij." 

4 The names from 1774 to 1780, inclusive, are in the hand of President LangdoiL 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



119 



Nathan Morey 
Benjamin Muzzey 
Brinley Silvester Oliver 
Daniel Parker M r 
Benjamin Putnam M r 1781 
Jacobus Putnam 
Johannes Rice M r 
Thomas Rindge Rogers M r 
Jacobus Sheaffe M r 
Josias Smith 
Moses Taft M r 
Johannes Thaxter M r 
Nathaniel Thomas 
Benjamin Thurston M r 
Onesiphorus Tileston M r 
Timotheus Trumball M r 
Johannes Tucker M r 
Jahakobus Welsh 
Laban Wheaton M r 
Bela Whipple 
Thomas Rice Willard 



*6" L 

Johannes Smith M r 17SG 



tethns 



M r 1781 



Benjamin Waterhouse M.D. et Lugd. 

Med. Theo. et Prax. Prof. Hers. 
Gulielmus Greenough M r 1779 
Cornelius Waters M T 1788 
Alexander Hamilton LL.D. 1792 
Sethus Reed M r 1781 
Dwight Foster M T 1781,. 
Johannes Smith M r 1780 l 

Octo ris 2 do 1775. 

Henricus Adams M r 1778 
Jahakobus Amadon 2 
Georgius Athern M r 3 



Rufus Badcock M r 4 

Ebenezer Battle M r 

Daniel Biglow M r 

Edvardus Billings M r 

Benjamin Bourne 1776. M r 1778. 

Franciscus Brinley 1777 

Samuel Chandler M r 1781 

Samuel Dogget 

Simeon Dunbar M r 

Jonathan Eames M r Tutor 

Josephus Emerson 

Samuel Gay M r 1785 

Isaacus Hall M r 

Benjamin Hey wood M r 

Petrus Hobart M r 1779 

Paulus Litchfield M r 1779 

Nathanael Macclintock M r 

Isaias Man M r 1779 

Jonathan Maynard 1776 M r 1781 

Thomas Fitch Oliver M r 

Isaacus Osgood M r 

Jacobus Otis M r 

Nathanael Paine M r 

Nathanael Peirce M r 

Johannes Poor M r 

Edvardus Pulling 1776 M r 1780 

Jesse Putnam M r 

Edvardus Hutchinson Robbins M r 

Daniel Shute M r 

Gulielmus Smith M r 

Johannes Jones Spooner M r 

Thomas Thacher M r 

Gulielmus Weeks M r 

Thomas Whiting M r 

Samuel Whitman 

Levi Willard 



Ebenezer Huntington 
Adoniram 



tidsen-M-' 



478S 



Ebenezer Huntington 



1 The seven names from Benjamin Waterhouse to Johannes Smith are written 
on a slip of paper attached by sealing wax to the page. The name of Alexander 
Hamilton is underscored twice. 

2 This entry is written over an entry erased. 
8 This entry is written over an entry erased. 
4 This entry is written over an entry erased. 



120 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Adoniram Judson M T 1782 
Nathanael Adams M r 1790 ' 

Augti 14 to 1776 

Johannes Bishop. 
Johannes Bullard M r 



Johannes Child M r 
Josua Coit M r 1784. 
Jude Damon M r 



[126] 

David Daniels M r 

Aaron Dexter M r M.D. Chym. et Mat. 

Med. Prof. Erving. 
Ephraimus Drury 
Josephus Emerson M r 
Ebenezer Smith Fowle M r 
Christophorus Gore M r 
Ephraimus Hall 
Timotheus Harrington M r 
Johannes Haven 
Gulielmus Heath M r 
Ezekiel Henley M r 
Aaron Hill M r 1785 
Isaacus Hurd M r 
Samuel Lee M r 1787 
Thomas Leverett M r 
Johannes Leverett M r 
Jacobus Lovell M r 
Jacobus Mann M r 
Plinius Merrick M r 
Georgius Morey M r 
Johannes Prince M r 
Johannes Remington M r 
Ezra Ripley M r 
Johannes Rogers M r 
Samuel Sewall M r 
Gulielmus Stearns M r 
Benjamin Stone M r 
Georgius Thacher 
Dean Tyler 
Royall Tyler M r 

Benjamin Allen 2 Upham Allen M r 
Jacobus Warren 
Ebenezer Wight M r 
Jonathan Willard M r 1780 
Johannes Williams. M r 



Samuel Winslow M r 
Petrus Woodward M r 
Samuel Woodward M r 



Samuel Sherburne Dartm : 
Isaacus Senter M.D. 1793 

Julii 16 to 1777. 

Edvardus Bangs 
Hodijah Baylies M r 1781 
Gulielmus Bently M r Tutor 
Petrus Clarke M r 
Jahakobus Conant 
Ebenezer Crosby M r 1782 
Samuel Crosby M r 
Thomas Dawes M r 1791 
Nathan Dodge M r 
Johannes Eliot Eaton 
Josephus Evans 
Jacobus Freeman M r 
Johannes Goddard M r 
Gulielmus Greenleaf 
Nathanael Healey M r 
Jahakobus Herrick M r 1788 
Samuel Hitchcock 
Jonathan Homer M r 
Josephus Hooper 
Ebenezer Hubbard M r 1782 
Josephus Kilburne M r 
Daniel Kilham M r 1785 
Rufus King M r 
Benjamin Lincoln M r 
Tliomas Noyes M r 
Dudley Odlin M r 
Seth Payson M r 



1 The names of Huntington, Judson, and Adams printed in italics are written 
on a slip of paper attached by sealing wax to the page. 

2 "Allen" is interlined. 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



121 



Johannes Penhallow 
Daniel Noyes Poor M r 
Huntington Porter M r 
Jonathan Porter M r 
Eliphalet Porter. M r 
Noah Rice M r 
Benjamin Rolfe M r 
Samuel Shuttles worth M r 
Ephraim Smith 
Aaron Smith M r 
Georgius Sparhawk M r 
Gulielmus Traill 
Cotton Tufts M r 
Sylvanus Wildes 
Johannes Chandler "Williams 



Daniel Foster M r 1785 
Gulielmus Little M r 1786 

Julii 15 to 1778. 

Petrus Adams M r 
Rufus Green Amory M r 
Aaron Bancroft M r 
Josephus Blaney 
Carolus Church 
Nathan Dane 
Thomas D wight M r 
Brown Emerson M r 
Jonathan Fay M T 
Jonathan Freeman M r 
Henricus Gallison 
Henricus Goodwin M r 
Eleazar James M r Tutor 
Josephus Jones M r 
True Kimball M r 



Martinus Kinsley M r 
Cornelius Lynde M r 
Georgius Richards Minot M r 
Elisaeus Parmele M r 
Phillips Payson M r 
Asa Piper M r 
Reuben Puffer 
Henricus Pynchon M r 
Ezekiel Savage M r 
Gulielmus Sever M r 
Gulielmus Spooner M r 
Ezra Stiles 
Job Sumner M r 1785 
Jacobus Thomas M r 
Jesse Tucker 
Nathanael Weare 
Zephanias Willis M r 

i • ] 1779 

Soratio Gateo Exercit : [L]igat : 

Imp : Hon : gratia LL D - 
Mon r Josephus dc ■ Valnaia Regis Christ . 

Consul Hon gr LL D 
Benjamin Chaplin 1779 
Edmundus Foster M r 1784 
Josias Reed M r 1785 
Asa Spalding M r 1791 
Josias Bartlett M.B. 1791 
Elijah Brigham M r 1794 l 

Julii 21 mo 1779. 

Isaacus Babson M r 
Sylvanus Bourn M r 
Andreas Bowers M r 1788 
Samuel Chandler 



[127] 

Abijas Cheever M r 1785 
Samuel Cobb 
Oliver Everett M r . 
Elisa3us Fish M r 
Nathanael Fadre Fosdick 
Daniel Friend M r 
Jacobus Gordon 



Gulielmus Gordon 
Johannes Hale M r Tutor 
Jonas Hart well M r 
Nathanael Appleton Haven M 1 
Johannes Hosley 
Benjamin Mason M r 
Josephus Palmer 



1783 



1 The six names printed in italics are written on a slip of paper attached by 
sealing wax to the page. 



122 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Nathanael Parker 
Thomas Perkins 
Thomas Roby M r 
Carolus Storer M T 
Barnardus Tucker 
Nathan Tyler 
Enoch Whipple M* 1783 
Levi Whitman M r 



Robertus Gates 
Moses Sweat M 7 



1790 



Julii 19 no 1780 

David Leonard Barnes M r 
Johannes Barrett M r 
Nathanael Bethume M r 
Parkman Bradshaw 
Gulielmus Brooks M r 1784 
Jacobus Brown M r 
Johannes Crane 
Gulielmus Croswell M r 1786 
Philippus Draper 
Ephraimus Eliot M r 
Abel Flint 
Aaron Hastings 
Jacobus Hughes M r 
Daniel Jenckes 
Jahakobus Kimball 
Nehemias Mason 
Elias Parkman 
Sylvanus Plympton 
Josephus Prince 
Isaacus Reed M r 1784 
Thomas Walley Russell M r 
Daniel Sargeant 
Gulielmus Symmes M r 
Jesse Thomas 
Jacobus True 
Fortescue Vernon 
Arnold Welles M r 
Jahakobus White 



Samuel Williams M r 1785 
Thomas Lindall Winthrop M r 



Oliver Lewis 1 781 
Thomas Chester M r 1781,. 
Johannes Robinson M r 1789 
Gulielmus Woodbridge M r 1789 



lehi 



l e s Smith -M^-et-^ inguarum -Profr- 






Et Honoris gratia 

- Ex c rcitus - 

Am e r ;- 
Leg atee ins 



Benjamin Lincoln Arm r 
Johannes Sullivan A tt a *- 






Jaeobus Sullivan Curia) Mass supreme 
Ju[s]£[i]eia(riug] ■ 

- Oliver Lewis A B 1781 Yal 1780 - 



Julii 18 vo 2 1781 3 

Dudley Atkins M r 
Johannes Bartlett M r 
Isaacus Bayley M r 
Carolus Bulfinch M r 
Johannes Davis M r 
Samuel Dexter M r 
Elisaeus Doane M r 
Petrus French M r 
Benjamin-Stacey Glover 
Isaias-Lewis Green M r 
Josephus Hall M r 
Georgius-Holmes Hall 
Johannes Haskins M r 
Abiel Hey wood M r 
Bezaleel Howard M r Tutor 
Daniel Hubbard 
Samuel Orne M r 
Elijah Paine M r 
Danforth Phipps 
Appleton Prentiss M r 
Nathan Read M r Tutor 



1 The names of Lewis, Chester, Robinson, and Woodbridge are written on a 
slip of paper attached by sealing wax to the page, over several names crossed out. 

2 "18" is altered, the original date being undecipherable. 

8 "1781" is altered from "1782." The names from 1781 to 1795, inclusive, 
are in the hand of President Willard. 









LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



123 



Nathanael Ruggles M r 
Johannes Saunders M r 
Jacobus Sever M r 
Edvardus Sohier M r 
Timotheus Swan M r 
Dudley- Atkins Tyng M r 
Edvardus Wendell M r 



Samuel Hinckley M r 1785 
Johannes Williams M r 1785 

Julii 17 mo 1782 

Artemas Baker 
Samuel Balch M r 
Josephus Bartlett M r 1786 
Benjamin Bartlett 
Samuel Bass M r 



[128] 

Abrahamus Biglow 

Jonathan Bird M r 

Ebenezer Bowman M r 

Nathanael Bridge 

Theophilus Capen M r 

Richardus Codman M r 

Johannes Dawson 

Josephus Estabrook M r 

Daniel Gould M r 

Edvardus Gray M r 

Sethus Hastings M r 

Moses Haven 

Reuben Hayes 

Timotheus-Lindall Jennison M r Tutor 

Samuel Kendal M r 

Benjamin Parker 

Samuel Payson M r 

Gulielmus-Dandridge Peck M r 

Samuel Quincy M r 

Gulielmus Reed M r 

Jonathan Remington 

Johannes-Jeremias Van Rensselaer 

Stephanus Van Ransselaer 

Chandler Robbins M r 

Nathanael Rogers M r 1792 

Larkin Thorndike 

Jedidias Tucker M r 

Carolus Warren 

Johannes Welles M r 

Henricus Wight M r 



Magiatri Yalonaoc ad cund< 
gradum admiooi 
■ Jo c ophuc Barker M r AB 1771 
Adoniram Judson M r AB 1775 



^feemasB[ ]- 

lesep-GrGsby-^rP 



-Kkr 



Julii 16 t0 1783 

Asa Andrews M r 1788 x 
Gulielmus Atkinson M r 
Josephus Barrell M r 
Jeremias-Smith Boies M r 
Gulielmus Brown M r 
Thomas Crafts M r 
Johannes Dash wood M r 
Ichabod Draper 
Johannes Ewins 
Georgius Fairservice 
Barnabas Hedge M r 
Gulielmus Jackson M r 
Samuel-Cooper Johonnot M r 
- Guli c lmua King -M*- 
Tobias Lear 
Daniel Leeds M r 
Alphaeus Moore M r 1791 
Harrison-Gray Otis M r 
Asa Packard M r 
Oliver Prescott M r 
Gulielmus Prescott M r 
Johannes Rowe M r 
Philippus Spencer 
Ambrosius Spencer 
Georgius Storer M r 
Eleazar Taft 
Josephus Taft 
Horatius Townsend M r 
Ebenezer Tucker M r 



1 Altered from "1786." 



124 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Artcmas Ward M r 
Ebenezer-Hinsdale Williams M r 



Johannes Foster M r 1787 
Abiel Holmes M r 1792 

Julii 21 mo A D 1784 

Johannes Abbot M r Tutor 
Samuel Abbot 



[129] 

Gulielmus Dorr M r 

Nathan Frazier M r 

Moses Gill M r 

Cadwallader Gray 

Thomas-Russell Greaves M r 

Benjamin Green M r 

Josua Green M r 

Gulielmus Greene 

Thomas Greenleaf 

Samuel Griffin 

Lemuel Hedge 

Jonathan-Cooper Hill 

Nathanael Hobart 

Zecharias Howard 

Silas Lee M r 

Ezekiel Little M r 

Henricus Mellen 

Prentiss Mellen 

Johannes Merrick M r 

Josua Paine M r 

Fredericus Parker 

Benjamin Parker M r 

Thomas Payson M r 

Benjamin Pickman M r 

Jesse Remington 

Nathanael-Johnson Robbins M r 

Ebenezer Seaver M r 

Georgius Stacey M r 

Gulielmus Stedman M r 

Moses Warren M r 1788 

Samuel Webber M r Tutor Math, 

Phil. Nat. Prof. Hoi. 
Job Wight 
Josephus Willard M r 



et 



Gulielmus Amory M r 
Jacobus Anderson 
Thomas Babbitt M r 
Gustavus Baylies 
Caleb Blake 

Jonathan Burr M r Tutor 
Ezra Conant 



Thomas Williams M r 
Timotheus Williams M r 



Nathan Smith M.B. 1790. 
Thomas Holt M r 1793. 

Julii 20 mo A D 1785 

Jacobus Allen 
Johannes Allyn M r 
Josephus-Gardner Andrews 
Carolus Coffin M r 
Thomas Crafts M r 
Ebenezer Dawes M r 
Samuel Derby M r 
Amasa Dingley M r 
Samuel Emerson M r 
Paulus Fearing 
Thadd^us Fiske M r 
Johannes Fleet M r M.D. 1795 
Barzillai Gannett 
David Gurney M r 
Jahakobus ' Haven M r 
Nathan Hay ward M r 
Pelatias Hitchcock 
Johannes Hubbard 
Ambrosius Hull 
Theodorus Lincoln M r 
Gulielmus Mackay M r 
Moses-Lea vitt Neal 
Amasa Paine M r 
Robert us Pierpont 1787 
Sethus Pratt 2 
Allen Pratt 2 
Ebenezer Putnam M r 



1 Written over a word erased. 

* A name has been erased between the names of Sethus Pratt and Allen Pratt, 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



125 



Merrick Rice M r 
Johannes-Miller Russell M r 
Jabez Upham 1786 
Henricus Ware M r 
Kilbum Whitman M r 

Julii 19 no A. D. 1786 

Johannes Andrews M r 

Samuel Andrews 

Johannes Bartlett 

Timotheus Biglow M r 

Josephus Blake M r 

Samuel Borland M r 1790 

Nathanael Bowman 

Alden Bradford M r Tutor 

Christophorus-Grant Champlin M r 

Daniel Colt 

Amos Crosby M r Tutor 

Gulielmus Cutler 

Johannes Derby M r 

Gulielmus Dodge 



Josias Dwight M r 

Robertus Fowle 

Elisseus Gardner M r 1794 

Samuel Gardner M r 

Johannes Gibaut M r 

Robertus Gray 

Jacobus Gray 

Gulielmus Harris M r 

Ebenezer Hill M r 1790 

Nathanael Howe M r 

Dudley Hubbard M r 1793 

Jonathan Leonard 

Henricus Lincoln M r 

Josephus Loring 

Johannes Lowell M r 

Porter Lummus M r 

Jahakobus Norton M r 

Isaacus Parker M r 

David Pearce 

Thaddaeus Pomeroy 

Jonathan-Edwards Porter M r 1790 



[130] 

Isaacus Rand M r 
Johannes Simpkins M r 
Jacobus Sullivan 
Johannes Taylor M r 
Josephus Thomas 
Thomas Thompson M r Tutor 
Johannes Tyler 
Johannes Warland 
Josephus Warren 
Tapley Wyeth M r 



Gulielmus Pearson M.B. 1789 
Samuel Sumner M r 1792 

Julii 18 vo A.D. 1787 

Gulielmus-Lovejoy Abbot M r 

Abiel Abbot M r Tutor 

Johannes-Quincy Adams M r 

Jonathan Amory M r 

Samuel Angier 

Gulielmus- Amherst Barron M r 1792 

Tutor 
Benjamin Beale M r 
Jacobus Bridge 



Josias Burge 

Johannes Chandler M r 1794 
Thomas Chandler 
Gardner-Leonard Chandler M r 
Caleb Child 
Gulielmus Cranch M r 
Josua Cushman 1791 
Petrus Eaton M r 
Oliver Fiske M r 
Johannes-Murray Forbes M r 
Bossenger Foster M r 
Nathanael Freeman M r 
Timotheus Fuller 
Thomas Hammond M r 
Thddseus-Mason Harris M r Bibli 
Gaulterus Hunnewell M r 
Josephus Jackson M r 
Asa Johnson M r 
Gulielmus-Samuel Judd 
Samuel Kellogg 
Ephraimus Kendal M r 
Nathanael Laurence M r 
Ebenezer Learned M r 
Moses Little 



126 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



Jacobus Lloyd M r 
Jacobus Lovell 
Gulielmus Mason M r 
Daniel Mayo 
Samuel Mead M r 
Ephraimus Morton 
Hezekias Packard M r Tutor 
Johannes Phelps 
Nathaniel-Shepherd Prentiss 
Samuel Putnam M r 
Isaacus Rand M r 
Johannes Sever M r 
Solomon Vose M r 1791 
Johannes-Jones Waldo 
Franciscus Welch M r 
Leonard White M r 
Richardus Whitney M r 1792 
Samuel Willard M r 
Samuel Williams M r 

Julii 16 to A.D. 1788 

Benjamin Abbot M r 
Solomon Adams M r 
Thomas Adams M r 
Thomas Bancroft M r 
Oliver Barron M r 
Stephanus Baxter M r 
Josephus Brigham M r 
Josephus Cabot M r 
Georgius Caryl 
Edvardus Clarke 
Oliver Dodge 



Jacobus Gardner M r M.B. 1792 
Adamus Gordon M r 
Gulielmus Hill 
Carolus Jackson 
Jahakobus Kimball M r 
Abner Lincoln M r 
Henricus Phelps 1789 
Johannes Phillips M r 
Jacobus Prescott M r 
Daniel-Clarke Sanders M r 
Gulielmus Sawyer M r M.B. 1792 
Amos Tappan 

Johannes Dexter Tread well M r 
Carolus Turner 
Nathan Underwood M r 
Samuel West M r 
Robertus Wier M r 



Jacobus-Otis Prentiss M. B. 1791 

Julii 15 t0 A. D. 1789 

Carolus Adams M r 
Ephraimus Allen 
Thomas Allen M r 
Israel Andrew M r 1794 
Zacchseus Bartlett 
Georgius Blake M r 
Franciscus Blake M r 
Georgius Bradbury M r 
Asaphus Churchill 



[131] 

Ebenezer Coffin 
Carolus Cutts M r 1795 
Johannes-Danforth Dunbar M r 
Gulielmus Emerson M r 
Nathanael Fisher 
Ebenezer Gay M r 
Aaron Green M r 

Benjamin Haskell M r M.B. 1793 
Samuel Haven M r 
Samuel Holyoke M r 
Hezekias Hooper M r 
Thomas-Woodbridge Hooper 
Johannes Hunt M r 



Johannes-Thornton Kirkland M r Tutor. 

Johannes Lathrop M r 

Levi Lincoln M r 

Nahumus Mitchel M r 

Cushing Otis M r 1792 

Robertus Paine M r 

Stephanus Palmer M r 

Jacobus-Hervey Pierpont 

Jonathan Proctor 

Samuel Shapleigh M r Bibli. 

Josias-Crocker Shaw M r 

Bezer Snell 

Gulielmus-Pepperell Sparhawk M r 



LIST OF GRADUATES, 1642-1795 



127 



Ebenezer Starr M r 

Phineas Taft 

Nathanael Thayer M r Tutor 

Nehemias Thomas M r 

Cotton Tufts 

Georgius-Baxter Upham 

Carolus Walker M r 

Foster Waterman M r Tutor 

Ludovicus Weld 

Edvardus-Stephanus Wigglesworth 

Jacobus Wilson M r 

Julii 21 mo A.D. 1790 

Thomas-Boylston Adams M r 

Erasmus Babbit 

Jonathan Bowman M r 

Johannes Callender M r 

Samuel Chandler 

Pitt Clark M r 

Samuel-Chandler Crafts M r 

Richardus Cutts M r 

Josephus Dennie 

Nahumus Fay M r M.B. 1793 

Thomas Gray M r 

Jonathan Grout M r 

Benjamin Hasey M r 

Petrus Holt M r 

Johannes-Clarke Howard M r 

Gilbertus-Harrison Hubbard M r 

Gulielmus Ingalls M r .M.B 1794 

Daniel Marrett M r 

Stephanus Moody 

Josias Quincy M r 

Nathanael Ruggles M r 

David Smith M r 

Daniel Staniford M r Tutor 

Micah Stone M r Tutor 

Johannes Sullivan 

Jacobus Sullivan 

Georgius Sullivan 

Johannes Tappan M r 

Thomas-Cushing Thacher M r 

Thomas Thomas M r 

Daniel Tilton 

Paulus Trapier M r 

Abija Tufts M r 



Rogerus Vose 
Samuel Walker 
Jonathan Ware M r 
Josephus Warren 
Josias Waters M r 
Samuel Welles 
Benjamin Whit well M r 
Franciscus Withers 
Samuel Wragg 



Petrus Schuyler Livingston 
Johannes-Baptista Menard M.B. 1793 

Julii 20 mo A.D. 1791 

Zabdiel-Boylston Adams M r 
Thomas Austin M r 
Amos Bancroft M r M.B. 1794 
Samuel-Procter Bayley M r 
Josephus Bixby 
Ephraimus Briggs M r 
Ezekiel-Hersey Derby M r 
Abrahamus Redwood Ellery M r 
Noah Fearing 
Johannes Harris M r 
Gulielmus Hodge M r 
Asa King M r 
Nathanael-Cabot Lee M r 
Johannes Morse M r 
Samuel-Benjamin Morse M r 
Moses-Porter Phelps M r 
Thomas Pickman M r 
Thomas Rice M r 
Luther Stearns M r Tutor 
Daniel Stone M r 
Ichabod Tucker M r 
Benjamin Turner M r 
Johannes Walton M r M.B 1794 
Henricus-Dana Ward M r 
Daniel- Wheaton M r 
Calvin Whiting M r 
Petrus Whitney M r 



Samuel Adams M.B. 1794 
Heber Chase M.B. 1794 



128 



COLLEGE BOOK I 



[132] 

Julii 18 vo A. D. 1792 

Jahakobus Abbot M r 

Abiel Abbot M r 

Josephus Allen M r 

Johannes Appleton M r 

Ebenezer Bradish M r 

Nathanael Chandler M r 

Thomas Danforth 

Gulielmus Dix M r M.B. 1795 

Justinus Ely M r 

Jonathan Fisher M r 

Johannes Gorham M r 

Jacobus Hawley M r 

Levi Hedge M r Tutor 

Henderson Inches M r 

Jedidias Ingalls M r 

Johannes Kimball M r 

Georgius-Gardner Lee M r 

Johannes Locke M r 

Gulielmus Mason M r 

Fredericus May M r M.B. 1795 

Luther Mills M r 

Hector Orr 

Thomas Paine M r 

Willard Peele M r 

Johannes Pipon M r 

Johannes-Snelling Popkin M r Tutor 

Phineas Randall M r 

Paulus Rolfe M r 

Samuel-Phillips Russell M r 

Philander Shaw M r 

Josephus Sprague M r 

Bradstreet Story M r 

Gulielmus Sullivan M r 

Stephanus Webster M r 

Nathan-Plimpton West M r 

Johannes Williams M r 

Jahakobus Wyeth M r 

Julii 17 mo A.D. 1793 

Phineas Adams 
Carolus Angier 
Gulielmus Ashley 
Johannes Avery 
Samuel Brown 
Johannes-Curtis Chamberlain 



Carolus Coffin 
Ward Cotton 
Carolus Cutler 
Jonathan D wight 
Caleb Ellis 
Samuel Farrar 
Samuel Fiske 
Nathanael-Hill Fletcher 
Josua Frost 
Franciscus Gardner 
Josephus Hilliard 
Timotheus Hilliard 
Carolus Jackson 
Gulielmus Jones 
Franciscus-Cabot Lowell 
Johannes-Byles Marshall 
Gulielmus Muzzy 
Carolus Paine 
Daniel Peters 
Johannes Pierce 
Josephus Prince 
Isaacus Story 
Josephus Stowers 
Fredericus-Augustus Sumner 
Samuel Thatcher 
Elihu Whitcomb 
Nicolaus-Bowes Whitney 
Thomas Wigglesworth 
Josephus Willard 
Augustus Willard 
Carolus- Williams Winship 

Julii 16 to A.D. 1794 

David Abbot 

Oliver Ainsworth 

Timotheus Alden 

Georgius- Washington Appleton 

Carolus-Humphrey Atherton 

Johannes Atkinson 

Gulielmus Biglow 

Jacobus Bowers 

Thomas Bowman 

Isaacus Braman 

Daniel Brooks 

Lucas Brown 

Franciscus-Dana Channing 






LAWS FOR THE LIBRARY, 1736 



129 



Gulielmus Crosby 
Christophorus Cushing 
Elijah Dunbar 
Daniel Emerson 
Samuel Aldridge Flagg 



Jahakobus Flint 
Thomas Geyer 
Jacobus-Blake Howe 
Edvardus Jackson 
David Kendall 



[133] 

Josephus M c Kean 
Jesse Olds 
Stephanus Peabody 
Josephus Perkins 
Samuel Stearns 
Hall Tufts 



Julii 15 to A.D 1795 



Thomas Baker 
Josias Bartlett 
Andreas Beattie 
Sethus Bemis 
Caleb Bradley 
Nathanael Bradstreet 
Samuel Bumstead 
Amos Choate 
Oliver Crosby 
Henricus Cumings 
Theodore Dehon 
Samuel- Adams Dorr 
Henricus Gassett 
Benjamin Gorham 
Curtis Guild 

[ 134-163 2 ] 



Johannes Heard 

Ebenezer Hunt 

Amos Kent 

Johannes Kittredge 

Ebenezer Lawrence 

Thomas Noyes 

Franciscus-Johonnot Oliver 

Johannes Phillips 

Carolus Prentiss 

Samuel-Jackson Prescott 

Gulielmus Salisbury 

Richardus-Cutts Shannon 

Nathanael Stone 

Josias Sturges 

Ebenezer-Coddington Thayer 

Benjamin Vinton 

Thomas Wales 

Georgius- Washington Wallingford 

Silas Warren 

Daniel Weston 

Josua Wingate 

Timotheus Winn 

Daniel Woods 



[164] 

This body of Laws for-y^ (or relating to) y* 5 Library of 
Harvard Colledge, was made by y e Corporation of 
said College, and finally compleated by y e over- 
seers consenting thereto. May. 20. 1736. 2 

1 That y e Library-Keeper be chosen for no longer a time Than 
one year; and on his removal, or a new choice, he shall give up an 

1 Pages [134-163] are blank. 

2 These Laws relating to the Library — pages [164-166] of the text, or pages 
129-134 of this volume — are, with the exceptions noted in the footnotes, in 
the hand of President Wadsworth. 



130 COLLEGE BOOK I 

account of y e state of y e Library to y e Corporation; and the Corpo- 
ration (or those whom they shall appoint) shall look over y e Library, 
& see y fc y e Books and other things pertaining 1 to y e Library, are all 
in their place & order. 

2 When y e Library Keeper goes out of Town, he shall (wit[&] y e 
approbation of y e President, & one or more of the Tutors signified 
under their hand) substitute some faithfull scholar, with whom he 
shall intrust y e Key of y e Library till his return ; who shall be obliged 
to y e same duty & attendance, as y e Library Keeper himself is when 
present. 

3 No Book shall be taken out of y e Library, or returned, without 
y e knowledge & presence of y e Library Keeper or his substitute ; y e 
name of the borrower & restorer, with y e Book itself & time of bor- 
rowing and returning, being orderly set down in y e Library Keeper's 
Book, by y e Library Keeper or his substitute. 

4 Such persons as are in y e Instruction or Government of y e Col- 
lege, & such Graduates as reside at y e College, or in y e Town of 
Cambridge (for y e benefit of following their studies) whose names 
are, or shall be, at their desire inserted in ^ College Quarter Bills, 
and all Senior Sophisters, may borrow Books out of y e Library ; and 
no other person without leave from y e Corporation; unless such 
Gentlemen of Learning as are setled in y e Town of Cambridge, and 
have special allowance from y e President & one or more of y e Tutors 
under their hands, for such Books as they shall desire. And no other 
things but Books shall be borrowed out of y e Library, except by those 
in y e Instruction or 2 Government of y e College. 

5. No Scholar in y e College, under a Senior Sophister, may borrow 
a Book out of y e Library : nor shall any borrow or let any Book, or 
other thing which he hath borrowed, go from under his personal 
custody. 

6. When y e Senior Sophisters shall be admitted to y e priveledge of 
borrowing Books out of y e Library, y e President, Professors & Tutors, 
shall advise them what Books are most proper for their reading 

7. No Scholar shall borrow any Book out of y e Library, oftner 
than once in three weeks: and the Masters, Bachelours, & Senior 



1 Substituted for "belonging," crossed out. 

2 Substituted for " &/' crossed out. 



LAWS FOR THE LIBRARY, 1736 131 

Sophisters, shall have in their order, their distinct weeks for 
borrowing. 

[165] 

8. No person, except such as * are concerned in y e Instruction & 
government of y e College, shall keep any Book belonging to y e Li- 
brary, longer than three weeks ; or borrow more out of y e Library 2 
than three Books at a time, without leave obtained from y e President 
& Tutors, signified to y e Library Keeper, by a note under y e Presi- 
dent's hand. 

9. The stated time for borrowing & returning Books, shall be fixed 
to Fryday ; on which day in each week, from eleven a clock till two 
in y e afternoon (times of vacation, & dinner time in y e College, ex- 
cepted) the Library Keeper or his substitute shall be obliged to give 
his attendance in y e Library for yt end ; and shall not permit 3 any 
Scholars to enter into y e Library, but shall deliver & receive y e Library 
Books, asked for, & returned, by y e Scholars, at y e Library door. 
And if any Scholar shall at such times attempt to enter into y e Library, 
he shall, upon complaint wch 4 made by y e Library Keeper shall 
make 5 to y e President & Tutors, be by them debarred y e priveledge 
of borrowing Books out of y e Library, and punished by pecuniary 
mulct, or otherwise, according to y e nature & circumstances of his 
offence. 

10. If any Scholar abuse, or unseasonably detain any Book bor- 
rowed by him, or injure y e Library any other way, Said Scholar, 
upon complaint which y e Library Keeper shall forthwith make to y e 
President & Tutors, shall pay double damages, and be debarred from 
borrowing till he has paid said damages (or has been otherwise pun- 
ished, at y e discretion of y e President & Tutors) and has obtained 
new leave from y e President & Tutors to borrow, signified to y e 
Library Keeper by a note under y e President's hand. But if any 
damage be done to y e Library, it's Books, or other things (unless by 



1 The word " as " is interlined. 

2 The words "out of y e Library" are interlined. 

3 Altered from '.' admit." 

4 The word "wch" is interlined. 

5 The words "shall make" are interlined. 



132 COLLEGE BOOK I 

unavoidable Providence, or on publick occasions when y e person y t 
hath done the damage can't be found) y e Library Keeper shall be 
charged with it, by y e President & Tutors; and y e sum charged shall 
be substracted from his salary by order from under y* President's 
hand. 

11. If any Scholar steal any Book, raritie, or other thing out of y e 
Library, he shall be expelled. 

12. To repair damages done by borrowing Books out ' of y e Li- 
brary, all Borrowers 2 (except those in y e Instruction or government 
of y e College) who holds a study in y g College, aa also each senior 
aophiator, shall pay eight shillings per Annum, to be charged in their 
respective Quarter Bills: this Law to continue & be in force for y e 
space of four years & no longer^ this law should run as follows viz. 4 

With respect to y e following Law. vid. Lib. N° 4. p. 225. 5 
aw being 12. To repair damages done by borrowin Books out of y e 
coKa! Library, all borrowers, except those who are in y e Instruction or 
n e 4o eer8 government of y e College, & Gentlemen of learning setled in 
eief/fjere Cambridge, & others that may have special leave from y e Cor- 
poration, shall pay two shillings per Quarter to y e College, which 
shall be charged in their respective Quarter Bills; and thi3 Law to 
continue for four years & no longer. 

13. No person shall go into y e Library without y e presence of y e 
Library Keeper or his Substitute, except those in y e Instruction or 
government of y e College and they onl[?/] | ] 7 



[166] 

14. No person besides y e Library Keeper, shall be allowed to have 
a Key to y e Library, excepting y e President who shall have one in his 



1 The word "out" is interlined. 

2 The words "all borrowers" are substituted for "every Batchelour, & 
Master," crossed out. 

3 Down to this point, paragraph 12 is printed as originally written; but later 
the entire paragraph was crossed out and the words "this law should run as 
follows, viz." were added by President Wadsworth. 

4 The word "viz." is interlined. 

6 This line is in the hand of President Holyoke. The reference is to page 
[225] of College Book IV. 

This marginal note is in the hand of President Holyoke. 

7 The bottom line has been trimmed off. 



LAWS FOR THE LIBRARY, 1736 133 

personal custody, to be used only in case of fire, or some other publick 
necessity. 

15. The Library Keeper shall, at y e charge of y e College, take 
care y* y e Library be kept in good repair, & yt no damage come to 
any ' Books or other things in y e Library, by y e weather, or want of 
convenient shelving &c also he shall keep y e Library duely swept, 
and y e Books clean, & orderly in their places. 

16 The Library Keeper shall go on to write, (or cause to be fairly 
written) in y e Library Book, y e names of all y e Books yt shall be 
brought into y e Library (1) In y e order as they are placed & dis- 
posed according to y e affixed Catalogues (2) In one continued Alpha- 
bet setting down y e Authors names, & what of their works are in y e 
Library, & where. (3) The names of ye several donors of y e Books, 
with y e Books given, & y e times when they were given. The like 
method he also shall take with respect to Manuscripts, Rarities, or 
any other things presented to y e Library for y e service of y e College, 
viz. That y e names of y e donors, y e time of their donations, and a 
particular account of y e things themselves yt are given be recorded 
by him in y e Library Book. 

17. If any Book or Books be given to y e Library, they shall be 
brought into y e Library with y e knowledge & consent of y e President 
& Resident Fellows of the Corporation, and an exact account thereof 
both in y e College Book, and in ye classes hanging before y e Library 
Books, shall be taken, & kept from time to time by y** Library Keeper ; 
and till such accounts be taken, no person whatsoever shall be al- 
lowed to detain or borrow any such Book or Books given to y e 
Library. 

[i]8. The Library Records 2 Manuscripts & such Rarities & other 
things as y e Corporation shall Judge expedient, shall be kept under 
Lock and Key in one or more convenient Receptacles in y e Library, 
and y e Key or Keys be kept by ye Library Keeper. But y e College 
Records (except those of frequent use) shall be kept in a suitable 
strong Receptacle in y e Library, and y e Key thereof kept by y e Presi- 
dent or senior resident 3 Fellow. 



1 The word "any" is interlined. 

2 The word "Records" is interlined. 

3 The word "resident" is interlined. 



134 COLLEGE BOOK I 

These Laws were here entered in this Book. May. 24. 1736. and 
were published in y e College Hall by y e President after morning 
prayers. July. 1. 1736. 

[ 167-181 1 ] 

[182] 

This 2 body of laws for Harvard College was made by the 

President & Fellows thereof, and consented to by the 

Overseers of Said College, Anno Domini 1734. 3 

Chapter first About Admission into the College. 

1. Whoever upon Examination by the President, and two at least 
of the Tutors, Shall be found Able ex tempore to read, construe & 
parse Tully, Virgil, or Such like common Classical Latin Authors; 
and to write true Latin in Prose, and to be SkilPd in making Latin 
verse, or at Least in the rules of Prosodia; and to read, construe & 
parse ordinary Greek, as in the New Testament, Isocrates or such 4 
like, and decline the Paradigms, of Greek Nouns, and Verbs ; Having 
withall good Testimony of his past blameless behaviour, shall be 
Look'd upon as qualified for Admission into Harvard College. 

2. Every Candidate for Admission, Shall procure and keep by him 
a true coppy of the College Laws, respecting his Duty, & priveledges, 
Which being Signed, by the President, & major part of the Tutors, 
Shall be his Admission into the College. 

3. None Shall be Admitted into the College, untill his Parent, 
Guardian or some other, pay five pound to the Steward, towards de- 
fraying his future College charge; and also give Bond to to y e Stew- 
ard with Security, to his satisfaction, in the sum of fourty pounds, to 
pay College dues Quarterly as they are charged, in the Severall 



1 Pages [167-181] are blank. 

3 The upper left-hand corner of page [182] has been numbered "(1)," the 
upper left-hand corner of page [183] has been numbered "(2)," and the upper 
left-hand corner of page [184] has been numbered "(3)." This separate pag- 
ination of the Laws was not continued after page [184]. 

3 These College Laws — pages [182-206] of the text, or pages 134-155 of this 
volume — are in the hand of Ebenezer Bridge, of the Class of 1736. 

4 Substituted for "the," crossed out. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 135 

f 

Quarter bills; viz* The Stewards, the Glaziers, & the Sweepers; 
Said bills being first Sign'd by y e President, and one at Least of the 
Tutors, And in case of Death, or removal, before College charges rise 
to the Sum of five pounds, the Steward Shall return the remainder to 
him y* gave y e Bond. 

4. None Shall be admitted Fellow Commoner, Unless He * first 
pay, one hundred pounds, to the College Treasurer, for y e time being, 
for the Use of the College ; and every Fellow Commoner Shall [ 183 ] 
pay double Tuition money. 

5. Fellow Commoners Shall have the priveledge 2 of Dining & sup- 
ping with the Fellows at their table in the Hall, and Shall be excus'd 
going on errands, Shall have the title of Master, and Shall have the 
priveledge of wearing their Hats as Masterfs] do ; 3 but Shall Attend 
all duties & Exercises with th[e] rest of the Class, and be alike Subject 
to the Laws & Government of the College, and Shall sit with theifr] 
own Class, and in their place in Class, at the worship of God in 
the Hall, and meeting House. 

6. Every Scholar in the first Quarter Bill made up after his Ad- 
mission, Shall be charged Six Shillings, to the Use of the College, for 
Gallery money. 4 

Chapter 2 d Concerning a Religious Virtuous Life 

1. All Scholars Shall behave themselves blamelessly, leading Sober, 
righteous, & godly Lives. 

2. The President shall constantly reside at Cambridge, and (unless 
necessarily hindred) Sha[//] pray in the Hall 5 morning & evening, & 
read some portion of the Old Testament in the morning, & of the 
New in the Evening (when there is no Repetition, or Theological ex- 
ercise) and he Shall expound some portion of Scripture ordinarily 
once a week, or Oftner If he can conveniently Attend it. And when 
the President can't Attend prayers in the Hall, one of the Tutors 
sha[ZZ] pray, and also read some portion of Scripture, they taking their 



1 Altered from "he." 

2 The letter " d ' ' in this word is interlined. 
8 Altered from "does." 

4 The letters "ey." are interlined. 

5 The word "Hall" is interlined. 



136 COLLEGE BOOK I 

turns by course, weekly; and whenever they shall do so for any Con- 
siderable time, they Shall be suitably rewarded for their Service. 

3. All persons of what degree soever, residing at the College, and 
all Undergraduates, whether dwelling in ! y e College or in the Town, 
Shall constantly & Seasonably attend y e worship of God in the Hall 
morning & evening. 

4. If an Undergraduate comes tardy to prayer (without reasons 
allow'd by the President or y e Tutor y 1 Calls over the weekly Bill) he 
Shall be fined Two pence, each time, and If he is Absent from prayer, 
(without reasons as Mores[aid)] [ 184 ] he shall be fined four pence a 
time. 

5. Tardiness at or Absence from, Divinity, & Phylosophical publick 
Lectures in the Hall, Shall be punished, as tardiness at, or Absence, 
from prayers in the Hall. 

6. All the Scholars shall at Sunset in the evening preceeding y e 
Lords day, retire to their Chambers, and not unnecessarily leave them, 
and all disorders on said evening, Shall be punished as violations of 
the Sabath are. And every Scholar shall on the Lords day, carefully 
Apply himself to the duties of Religion, and piety And whosoever 
Shall profane said day by Unnecessary buisness, or visiting, walking 
on the common, or in the streets, or Feilds in 2 y e Town of Cambridge, 
or by any sort of diversion before sunset ; or that in the evening After 
the Lords day, shall behave himself disorderly, or any way unbecom- 
ing the Season, Shall be fined not exceeding ten Shillings. And If 
Such scholars shall not reform after being privatly Admonished, he 
shall be further punished by publick Admonition, degradation, or 
Expulsion. 

7. If any Scholar shall be Absent from publick worship in the meet-- 
ing houo o , on either part of the Lords day, without giving sufficient 
reason, he shall be fined three Shillings. And If bodyly Infirmity 
or any other Necessary occasion prevents his Attendance on Said 
Worship, 3 he shall Notifie his Tutor, and in his Absence y e President, 
or some other Tutor, at the ringing of the first Bell, otherwise his Ab- 
sence shall be esteemed Groundless. And whoever shall come tardy 
to y e publick worship, Shall be punished Six pence, or Otherwise at 



1 Substituted for "at," crossed out. 

2 Substituted for "of," crossed out. 

3 Written over "day," erased. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 137 

the discretion of y e President or * one of the Tutors, not Exceeding 

2. i 

Two Shillings. Also whoever shall be guilty of vain or loose behaviour, 

or of playing or sleeping at the Publick worship, or shall go out of 
the [ 185 ] meeting house before y e Publick worship is ended, shall be 
punished frome one to five Shillings, as y e circumstances may be, Ac- 
cording to the discretion of the President, or one of y e Tutors 

8. Inas much as complaints have been made of disorders in y e 
meeting house, by Scholars going theither before the ringing of the 
Second bell; it is therefore ordered, y* no undergraduates Sha[//] 
go to y e 2 meeting House on the Lords day, before y e ringing of the 
Second bell. And whoever shall trangress this Law, Shall be punished 
by the President or one of the Tutors, not exceeding Tw[o] Shillings. 

9. Undergraduates Shall in their course repeate at Least the heads 
of the forenoon & Afternoo[?i] Sermons on the Lords day evenings 
in y e Hall and Such as are delinquent, Shall be punished by the Pres- 
ident, or one of the Tutors, not exceeding three Shillings. 

10. All profane and irreverent 3 behaviour, at prayers, or publick 
Divinity Lectures, in y e Hal[/] shall be punished after the same 
manner, w[ th ] Irreverence, at y e Publick worship in the meeti[w#] 
house; the Divinity Professor to have an equa(7] power with the 
President or Tutors, of punishing such offenders at his Lecture. 

11. All Scholars Shall shew due respect & honoujV] in speech & 
behaviour, as to their Natural parents So to Magistrates, Elders, y e 
President and Fellows of y e corporation, and to all Othefrs] concern'd 
in y e Instruction, or Government of y e College, and to all Superiours 
keeping due silence in their presence, and not disorderf/?/] gainsaying 
them ; But Shewing all laudab[Ze] expressions of Honour & reverence 
y* are in Vs[e] Such as uncovering the head, rising up in their presence, 
and the Like; and Particularly Undergraduates Shall be uncovered 
in the College Yard, when any of the overseers, the Presidf^] [186 ] 
or Fellows of the Corporation, or any Others concern'd in the Govern- 
ment, or instruction of the College, are therein; & Bachelors of Art 
Shall be uncovered when the President is there. 



1 The words "y e President or" are interlined. 

2 The word "y e " is interlined. 

3 Apparently altered from " irreverant. " 



138 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Chapter 3 d concerning Scholastical Exercises. 

1. That the Scholars may furnish themselves, with Usefull Learning* 
they shall keep in their respective 1 Chambers, and diligently follow 
their Studies, except half an hour at Breakfast, at Dinner from 
Twelve to Two, and After evening prayers, till nine of the clock. To 
this End, The Tutors shall frequently visit their Chambers, (especially 
in their several districts) after Nine a Clock in the Evening, and at 
Other Studying times, to quicken them to their buisness. 

2. If any Undergraduates are Absent from their chambers, in 
studying time, or After Nine a Clock in the evening (unless they 
give Sufficient reason for It) they shall be punished by the President, 
or any of the Tutors, not exceeding two Shillings. 

3. The Undergraduates shall be brought forward by their respec- 
tive Tutors, in the knowledge of the three Learned Languages. Viz* 
Latin, Greek & Hebrew, (excepting as to y e Hebrew, those y fc Shall 
be Obliged to attend the Hebrew Instructor) and Also in the knowl- 
edge of Rhetorick, 2 Logick, Natural Phylosophy, Geography, Ethicks, 
Divinity, Metaphysicks, and In the Elements of the Mathematicks. 
And the Tutors shall take care, to instruct their pupills in such Au- 
thors, as the President 3 and major part, of the Tutors Shall Agree on ; 
excepting the Ethical & Theological Authors, Shall be such only as 
shall be Allow'd by the Corporation. 

4. The Undergraduates shall in their course declaim publickly 
in the Hall, in one of y e three Learned Languages, and in no other 
with 4 [ 187 ] without leave or direction from the President, and im- 
mediately give up their Declamations, fairly written, to the President. 
And he that Neglects this exercise shall be punished by the Preside[/*/] 
or Tutor y l calls over the weekly bill, not exceding five shillings. & 
Such delinquent Shall within one week after, give into the president, 
a written Declamation, Subscribed by himself; and if out of Town 
he shall give in such Declamati[o?i] within one week after his return, 
under penalty as Aforesaid. 



1 The word "respective" is in the margin, apparently added later. 

3 The second and third letters in this word have apparently been altered. 

3 The letter "t" in this word is interlined. 

4 The word "with" ends the last line on page [186], leaving no space for "out," 
which is added at the bottom of the page as a catchword. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 139 

5. The Senior Sophisters shall dispute publickly in the Hall, once 
a week till the tenth of Mar[c/t] and the Iunior Sophisters, after the 
same manner twice a week during y 1 term, and once a week afterwards. 

6. The Senior Sophisters shall Attend their exercieses with their 
Tutors, till the tenth day of March ; and with the Professors, till the 
twentieth of Iune. 

7. If any Undergraduates are Absent from, or Slightly perform, 
their Stated exercises, with their respective tutors, or Hebrew In- 
structor or shall Absent themselves from the private lectures, of the 
Professors, they shall be punished by their respective Professors, 
Tutors, or Instructor,?] not exceeding five Shillings, and If they do 
not speedily reform, by such pecuniary Mulcts, they shall be Ad- 
monished, degraded, or expell'd according as the Nature and degree 
of the Offence shall require. 

8. No Scholar that is on M r Hollis's foundation, or that receives 
any other benefit from the College, Shall enjoy the same, any longer 
than he continue exemplary for sobriety, diligence & good order. 

9. If any Resident Bachelour, Sen r or Jun r Sophisper] shall 
Neglect, to Analyse, in his course according to the direction of the 
President, or do this exercise Slightely & carelessly, 1 he shall be pun- 
ished] by the President not exceeding, ten Shillings. 

[188] 

10 Resident Bachelours, shall dispute in the Hall once a Forght- 
night 2 (from y e tenth of September to the tenth of March) on such 
questions as the President ehall directs 3 to. If any be Absent from 
such exercises, without leave from the President, he shall be punished 
by the President not exceeding five shillings; and If a Respondent, 
from five to ten Shillings, at y e Presidents discretion. 

11. All Resident Graduates, shall Attend y e publick lectures, of 
the Divinity Professor, and all Resident Bachelours his private lectures. 



1 The first "e" in this word is interlined. 

2 Apparently "week" was originally written, then erased, and "Forght- 
xiightly" written over it. 

3 Altered from "direct," the "s" being interlined. 



140 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Chapter 4 th Concerning penal Laws. 

1 . If any Undergraduate presume to go out of Town without leave 
from his Tutor, or in his Absence, of the President, or some other 
Tutor, he shall be punished not exceeding five Shillings, at the discre- 
tion of the President, or one of the Tutors. 

2. Those Scholars, who live with in ten miles of the College, may 
have leave four days in a Month, to visit their frinds; those who 
live from ten to fifty miles, may have leave for y e Purpose Aforesaid, 
once a quarter, not to exceed ten days each time ; those who live fifty 
miles & upwards, may have leave, for the like purpose, twice in a 
year, not to exceed Twenty one days each time, unless a longer time 
Should in the Judgment of the President, & their respective Tutors, 
be thought Necessary. Provided nevertheless, No Undergraduate * in 
ordinary cases, shall have leave to be Absent, so as to omitt his decla- 
mation, or Analysis, And If shall 2 any Transgress the limits set, and 
Allow'd him, he shall be punished Eight pence per Day, five shillings 
per week, & thirty Shillings per month, (and If his Absence shall 
exceed Two months, he shall be degraded ; If It exceeds four months 
he shall be expell'd) unless he gives Satisfactory reasons for such his 
Absence; 3 which Reasons shall be judged of by his Tutor, (If the 
Absence [ 189 ] Dont exceed a week; If It does not exceed a Fortnight, 
by two or more of the Tutors ; and If It doth exceed a Fortnight, then 
by the President & Tutors. 

3. The vacation begining at commencement shall continue but 4 six 
weeks; at the expiration of which time, the President, Tutors, Pro- 
fessors, & Instructor, shall forthwith set About the buisness of their 
respective Offices, If any Undergraduates (Senior Sophisters not 
excepted) Shall Continue Absent from the College, longer than the 
Said ter[m] he shall be punished for every day, week, and month, as 
is provided in the preceeding Law. 

4. No Undergraduate Shall Lodge or board out of the College 
(unless his Parents, Guardian, or Near Relations, are so nigh, that 
he may Conveniently lodge & board with them) without leave from 



i The second "a" in this word is interlined. 

2 The word "shall" is interlined, obviously in the wrong place. 

3 "Absence" is written over a word erased. 

4 The word "but," in the hand of President Wadsworth, is interlined. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 141 

the President & Tutors; and If he Obtain|Y| leave, It shall be at such 
house, 1 as y e Presidenp] and Tutors Allow of. And If any continue 
to transgress this Law for one month After Admonition by the Presi- 
dent & Tutors, he Shall b[e] expelled. 

5. If any Undergraduate shall suffer anyone to lodge at his chamber, 
who is not a member of the College (his father or 2 guardian ex- 
cepted) without leave from the President, or one of the Tutors, his 
own Tutor If in Town, he shall be punished not exceeding five 
Shillings. 

6. If any Scholar shall entertain at his Chamber, or familiarly 
associate with, any person of a loose or 3 ill Charecter, he shall be 
punished by the President and Tutors or any one of them, not ex- 
ceeding five shillings ; and If he persist in so doing, he shall be pub- 
lickly Admonished, degraded or expell'd According to the Aggravation 
of his Offence. 

7. If any Scholar shall go beyound y e College Yar[d] or fences with- 
out Coat, Cloak, or Gown, (unless in his Lawfull diversions) he shall 
be punished by the President, or one of the Tutors, not exceeding Two 
Shillings. And If any shall 4 Presume to put on or wear [ 190 ] In- 
decent Apparell, he shall be punished According to the Nature and 
degree 5 of the Offence, by the President or one of the Tutors ; but 
If he wears womens Apprell, he shall be liable to publick 6 admoni- 
tion, degradation or Expulsion. 7 

8. If any scholar shall unnecessarily frequent Taverns, or shall go 
into any Tavern or Victualling House in Cambridge to eat or Drink 
there 8 (unless call'd by his Parent or Guardian) without leave from 
y e President or one of The Tutors ; or If any Scholar shall frequent, 
any house or shop in the Town of Cambridge, After he is forbidden 
by the President or one of the Tutors, he shall be punished by them, 
(or any one of them) not exceeding five Shillings; and If he persist 



1 Apparently "houses" was originally written, and the final letter then 
crossed out. 

2 Substituted for "and." 

3 The word "or" is interlined. 

4 The word "shall" is interlined. 

6 The words "and degree" are interlined. 

6 The word " publick' ' is interlined. 

7 Written over "Admonition," erased. 

8 The word "there" is interlined. 



142 COLLEGE BOOK I 

in Transgressing any part of this law, he Shall be further punished 
by Admonition, degradation or expulsion. 

9. If any Scholar shall be convicted of Blasphemy, Fornication, 
Robbery, Forgery, or of any other very Atrocius crime, he shall be 
expelled forthwith. 

10. If any Scholar shall profanely swear or curse, or take Gods 
name in vain, he shall be fined from five to ten Shillings, by the 
President ! or one of the Tutors; and if such scholar dont reform he 
shall be further punished by publick Admonition, Degradation, or 
Expulsion, as the circumstances may be. 

11. If any Graduate shall play at Cards or Dice, he shall be fined 
Twenty Shillings: If He Shall Offend Again, he shall make a Pub- 
lick confession; and If a third time he shall not be Allowed to con- 
tinue any longer at y e 2 College, or be expell'd as the Nature of y e 
Offence shall require. 

If any Undergraduate shall play at Cards or Dice, he shall be 
punished by fine, not exceeding ten Shillings, with Admonition; or 
by degradation, or expulsion According to the Aggravation of the 
Offence. 

[191] 

And If any Undergraduate shall play at any game whatsoever, for 
money, or moneys worth, he shall be punished by the President, or 
one of the Tutors, not exceeding five Shillings, and If he repeat his 
Offence, or play for any thing of considerable Value, he shall be further 
punished by Admonition, Degradation, or Expulsion, According to 
the Aggravation of the Offence. 

12. If any Undergraduates shall buy, sell, barter or exchange among 
themselves, Books, Apparell or any Other thing to above one Shilling 
value, without the leave of the President, their Tutors, Guardians, 
or Parents; it shall be in the power of the President or their Tutors, 
to make void suc[&] bargain, and the guilty Shall be punished by fine 
not exceeding five shillings, or Otherwise According to the Aggrava- 
tion of y** Crime. 

13. If any Scholar Shall be guilty of Lying, he shall for the first 



i The letter "t" in this word is interlined. 
2 The word "y e " is interlined. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 143 

Offence be fined by the President, or o[ne] of the Tutors, not exceeding 
five shillings ; and if he persist therein, he shall make a Publick con- 
fessio[/i] be degraded or expell'd. 

14. If any Scholar shall be guilty of Stealing, he shall make full 
restitution, and be liable to pay double damages besides, to the Party 
injured] and shall be punished by making publick confession, by 
degradation, or Expulsion according to the degree of the Offence. 

15. If any Scholar shall be guilty of opening by pick lock or false 
key, or Other Instrument ; or of breaking open any Chamber, Study, 
Cellers, Chesp,] Desk, or any place under lock & key, or Otherwise l 
Secured, he shall make good all damages, and b[e] punished by fine 
not exceeding Twenty Shillings, and make a publick Confession ; or 
be Degraded or expell'd. And If any Scholar Shall have a pick lock, 
or false key by him, It Shall be Counted a Misdemeanour, and be 2 
punished at th[e] [ 192 ] discretion of the President and Tutors. 

16. If any Scholars Shall be guilty of drunkeness, he Shall be fined 
five shillings; or he shall make a publick confession, be degraded, 
or expelled according to the Aggravations of the Offence. 

17. No person of what degree soever residing in the College, Shall 
make Use of any Distill'd spirits, or of any such mixt drinks as punch 
or Flip, in entertaining one another, or strangers, And If any Under- 
graduate shall transgress this law, he shall be punished for the first 
Offence by the President or one of the Tutors, If a Bachelour, by the 
President & Tutors, not exceeding five Shillings; for the Seccond 
offence not exceeding ten Shillings ; for a third Offence, he shall make 
a publick confession; and for a fourth Offence he shall be degraded 
or expell'd. 

18. No Undergraduate shall keep by him Brandy, Rum, or any 
other distill'd Spirituous Liquors ; 3 Neither 4 Shall he Send for any 
of the Said Liquors, 5 without leave from the President or one of the 
Tutors; and whosoever shall Transgress this Law, shall have the 
Said Liquor y* is found with him, taken from him and dispos'd of, 
by the President & Tutors, and he shall be further punished, not 



1 The letter "r" in this word is interlined. 

2 The word "be" is interlined. 
8 Altered from "Loquors." 

4 The letter "N" in this letter is written over "^ 

5 Apparently altered from "Liquous." 



144 COLLEGE BOOK I 

exceeding five shillings. And any Scholar y* Shall fetch such spiritu- 
ous Liquors, without Leave as Aforesaid, Shall be punished in like 
manner. 

19. Whereas much damage has been sustained by y e Cutting of 
Lead from 1 off the old College, for the future the door leading up to 
the top of the said College, Shall be always keep t Lock'd; and there 
Shall be two keys to the Lock of Said door, one of them to be left with 
the President, y e Other with the Butler; and If any Scholar, (except 
y e Butler) be seen on the top of Said College (without leave from the 
President, or one of the Tutors) he shall pay not exceeding five Shil- 
lings, And If he cuts or takes any [ 193 ] Lead from thence, he shall pay 
not exceeding five Shillings, & repair all Damages. And If any 
Scholar is found Privy to the transgression of this Law, and does not 
discover it, he shall pay not exceeding five shillings, as the President 
and Tutors shall direct. 

20. Whereas there have been at sundry times, great disturbances 
occasion'd by tumultuous Indecent Noises at the College, for pre- 
venting the like, fo[r] the future, it is ordered that if any Scholar or 
Scholars belonging to the College, Shall be found guilty of making 
tumultuous or Indecent noises, to the dishonour & disturbance of the 
College ; or to the disturbance of the Town or any of Its Inhabitants ; 
every Scholar so Offending, shall be liable to be fined five Shillings, 
and to be publickly Admonished or degraded for the first Offence; 
for the Second offence to be fined ten shillings, and to be degraded or 
expeird. 

21. If any Scholar or Scholars being thereunto required, shall 
refuse to give evidence respecting the breach of any College Laws, 
or Shall falsyfy therein, upon examination before the President or 2 
tutors; he or they Shall be punished by fine, not exceeding ten Shil- 
ling^] or by Admonition, degradation, or expulsion. 

22. For rendring more effectual the fines that are imposed by the 
President, Professors, Tutors, or Instructor; It is ordered that they 
be so particularly specified, as y* the Parents or Guardians] of the 
delinquents, may know how much and for what, they are punished. 
And to this End the Butler shall be Obliged, quarterly to prepare & 



i The word "from" is interlined. 
2 Substituted for 1'and," crossed out. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 145 

Sign, a list, of each pupills punishmenp] giving an Account for what 
they were imposed and Shall lay the Same before the Tutor [194] 
whose turn it is to make up the quarter bill, and then transmit it to 
the Steward, who shall Annex it to the Account of charges, which he 
shall send to such pupills Parent or Guardian: and the Butler and 
Steward shall be allowed out of the fines for their Trouble & charge, 
as shall be agree'd upon by the Corporation. 

23. Notwithstanding the preceeding pecuniary Mulcts, it shall be 
lawfull for the President, Tutors, or Professors, to punish Under- 
graduates by Boxing, when they shall ludge the Nature or 1 circum- 
stances of the Offence call for It. 

24. No Scholar (or his Parent, or Guardian in his behalf) Shall 
exhibit to any Other Authority, than that of the College, a complaint 
Against any of the Governours or resident members thereof, for any 
injury cognizable by the Authority of the College, before he has sought 
for redress to the President and Tutors, and in case of their denying 
him releif, to the Corporation & overseers; and if any Scholar (or 
his Parent or Guardian for him) Shall without such Application made, 
or contrary to the Determination of the Corporation & overseers 
carry said complaint, to any Other Authority, such Scholar shall 
forthwith be expelled the College. 

Chapter 5 th Concerning the Scholars Commons. 

1. All the Tutors, & Professors, Graduates & Undergraduates, 
who have Studies in College, Shall constantly be in commons, while 
Actually residing at College, vacation time 2 excepted ; and shall 
Dine and Sup in the Hall; at y e Stated meal times, except waiters 
(and such whose Parents or Guardians live so nigh that they may 
Conveniently board with them) and Such Others as the President 
and Tutors shall in cases of Necessity exempt, Provided always that 
no Professor, or Tutor, Shall be exempted [ 195 ] but by the leave of 
the Corporation with the consent of the Overseers. And the Tables 
Shall b[e] covered with clean linnen cloaths, of a Suitable] length & 
breadth twice a week, and furnished with Pewter Plates, the plates 3 



i Altered from "of." 

2 The word "time" is interlined. 

3 The words "the plates" are interlined. 



146 COLLEGE BOOK I 

to be procured at 1 y e Charge of the College, and Afterwards to be 
maintain'd a[/] 2 the charge of the 3 Scholars, both Graduates and 
Undergraduates; in such manner as the corporation shall Direct. 

2. No Scholars shall be put in or out of Commons but on Tuesdays 
or 4 frydays, and no Bachelour or Undergraduates, but by a Note 
from the President, or one of the Tutors, (If an Undergraduate, from 
his own Tutor If in Town) and when any Bachelours or Under- 
graduates have been out of Commons, the waiters at their respective 
tables, Shall on the first Tuesday or Fryday After they become 
Obliged by the preceeding law to be in commons, put em into com- 
mons, Again, by Note after the mannefr] Above directed. And If 
any Master neglects [to] put himself Into commons, when by the pre- 
ceeding Law he is Obliged to be in common^] the waiters on the 
masters Table, Shall Apply to the President, or one of the Tutors, 
for a Note to put him into commons and inform him of [it.] 

3. The waiters when the Bell tolls at meal tim[e] shall receive the 
Plates and Victualls at the Kitchen Hatch, & carry the same to the 
severall tables for which they are designed. And none shall receive 
their commons, oup] of the Hall, Except in case of Sickness, or som[e] 
weighty Occasion. And the Senior Tutor, or Other Senior Scholar 
in the Hall Shall crave 5 a blessing, & return thanks. And al[/] the 
Scholars while at their meals, Shall [sit] in their Places, & behave 
themselves, decent[ly] & orderly; and whosoever shall be rude or 
Clamourous at such time, or shall go out o[/] the [ 196 ] Hall before 
thanks be returned, Shall be punished by one of the Tutors, not ex- 
ceeding five Shillings. 

Chapter 6 th About Academical degrees. 

1. No Academical degrees shall be given, but by the Corporation, 
with the Consent of the Overseers. 

2. Every scholar that on proofe is found able to read the original 
of the Old and New Testament, into the latin tongue, & to 6 resolve 



1 Substituted for "by," crossed out. 

2 Substituted for "by," crossed out. 

3 The words "charge of the" are interlined. 
« Altered from "&." 

5 The letter "v" in this word has been altered. 
The word " to " is interlined. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 147 

them logically; and to be well instructed, in y e principles of the 
Mathematicks, and Natural and Moral Phylosophy (withall being 
of a blameless life and conversation) and at any publick 1 Act 2 shall 
have the Approbation of y e President and Fellows of the College, 
with the Consent of the Overseers, may be invested with a first 
Degree, Viz 1 Bachelours 3 of Arts. Otherwise No Scholar may be 
Admitted, to a first degree, unless he hath been, at the College three 
years and ten months, at the least from his Admission, being blameless, 
and having Attended upon, and performed ; all Publick exercises. 

3. What Bachelour soever shall make a Common place, or Synopsis 
of any of the Arts, or Sciences, and publickly read the same in the 
College Hall, in the third year after his first Degree; and be ready 
to defend his Theses, and is skill'd in the Original Tongues, and 
continueth blameless, Shall After approbation at a publick Act, be 
capable of a Second Degree, Viz* of Master of Arts, And no Other 
Degree shall be given, besides the Abovenamed, but in such cases, 
& upon such conditions, as the Corporation shall Iudge 4 fitt, the 
Overseers consenting thereunto. And every person y* 5 has Received 
any degree, may have a Diploma testifying the same, if he shall desire 
it, and bring a fair coppy of the established form [ 197 ] written on 
parchment, and other things Necessary therto. 

[4]. 6 Each Candidate for his first or Second Degree, shall pay 
Twenty shillings to the President, and Twenty Shillings to the Stew- 
ard, towards defraying the charge of the commencement dinner; and 
each candidate for his second degree, shall pay twenty shillings to 
the Steward for the use of the College. 

5. No person shall receive a first or second degree, unless he 
exhibits to the President, a Certificate from the Steward, that he has 
satisfied his college dues, charged in the quarter bills, or Otherwise 
According to custom, Nor shall any person be admitted to either of 
the degrees Aforesaid, who hath not paid every other officefr] of the 



1 A word is here crossed out. 

2 The word "Act" is interlined. 

3 Perhaps the letter " s" in this word has been crossed out. 

4 Substituted for "think," crosssd out. 

5 Apparently written over "or" 

6 The inside edge of this page has been repaired by pasting a piece of paper 
along it, thereby obliterating the number. 



148 COLLEGE BOOK I 

College his just dues, provided such officer make -a- complaint thereof 
to the president & Tutors, on or before the fifteenth of Iune. 

6. For the Preventing disorder & extra vigances at Commencement, 
it is ordered y* the commencement for the time to come, be more 
private than formerly, and that the particular day for the Commence- 
ment from time to time, be appointed by the corporation; that the 
Honourable & Pteverend Overseers of the College, be reasonably 
acquainted with said day, and be desired to Honour the solemnity 
with their presence, That the exercises of Commencement be the 
same, and perform 'd in such publick manner as Usual, that the partic- 
ular day for the Candidates, for their second degree to Appear at 
College, be lefp] from year to year, to the determination of the cor- 
poration; that a Dinner be provided in y e Hall 1 as Usual. And 
that no commencer shall hav[e] at his Chamber any Plumb cake, 
plain cake or Pyes, or hot meats of any sort except what is left of y e 
dinner 2 in the Hall ; or any Brandy ; Rum, or any Distill'd Spirits, 
or composition made with any of them. And If any of these prohibited 
Drinks] [198 ] or Provisions shall be found in theChambers or studies, 
of any of the commencers, or with in any of the dependancies 3 thereof, 4 
such Offender shall be liable to be debar'd his degree. And who- 
soever after he has taken his degree, shall at that commencement 
act contrary to any of these prohibitions, and be convicted there of 
within three months, shall be liable to be denyed his Second degree, 
If a Bachelour ; and if a Master, he shall be liable to be denied a 5 
Diploma, and all priveledge of ever living at the College; And the 
Corporation with the Tutors shall visit the Chambers of the com- 
mencers, to see that this Law be well Observed. 

Chapter 7 th About the Steward, Cook & Butler. 

1. While the same person is Steward and cook he shall procure 
wholsom & suitable Bread -and- Beer, and other Provisions for the 
Scholars and may Advance fifty per Cent, Above the Currant price. 
And he shall Allow to the College for the Kitchen, Brewhouse, and 



1 The letters "11" in this word are interlined. 

2 The words "of y e dinner" are interlined. 

3 The letter "i" in this word is interlined. 

4 The word "thereof" is interlined. 

6 Substituted for "his," crossed out. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 149 

for y e Use, wear and tear of College Utensills belonging to his office, 
so much per Annum as the Corporation shall think fitt - fe e Direct. 

2. The price of Bread -and Beer, & commons and Siezings at the 
Kitchen, shall be from time to time stated by the Corporation. 

3. The steward shall at the direction of the Corporation, procure 
at the Charge of the College, all proper Utensils, for the Butery and 
Kitchen, from time to time, as there shall be occasion. 

4. The Butler and Cook shall constantly keep the rooms and 
Utensils, belonging to their several Offices, Sweet and clean fitt for 
Use. And y e Kitchen Pewter in constant Use shall be Scowred [ 199 ] 
Twice a Quarter; 1 and the Butlers drinking vessel^] once a month, 
or oftner as the President, & 2 Tutors sha[/Z] Direct. And said Butler 
and cook shall Exhibit to them an Inventory of the Utensils belonging 
to their respective Offices once a Quarter. And in case of Neglect, 
in any of the Articles of this Law, Said Butler and Cook shall be 
Subject to a fine, not exceeding twenty shillings, at the Discretion, 
of the President and Tutors. 

5. The Butler shall take care that all fines imposed by the President, 
Tutors, Professors, or Instructor, be fairly recorded in a book by him 
to be kept for y 1 purpose, and shall quarterly 3 deliver, said book to 
the Tutor that makes up the quarter bill; and such Tutor shall not 
remit or Abate any fine, without the consent of the President, Pro- 
fessors & Tutors, or major part of them at a meeting duely warned. 

6. The Cook & Butler respectivly shall be accountable for such 
of the College Utensils as they have in their custody ; and shall make 
good all such detriment or loss, as Shall happen to said Utensils by 
their Neglect. And Said Butler and Cooke shall observe w* Number 
& kind of Utensils, the waiters carry to each table in the Hall, and 
shall imediatly after meals, demand the same of the Senior waiter, 
at each table then present; and if any Utensil be not forthwith 
returned, the waiters of that Table -shaH- where it was imployed, Shall 
(upon complaint made to the President and Tutors) be obliged to 
pay the value thereof for the Use of the College. And whosoever 
shall damnifie or Abus[e] any of the College Utensils, or any thing 
else belonging to the College, shall (upon complainp] made as Afore- 

1 Substituted for "week," crossed out. 

2 Altered from "or." 

3 The first "r" in this word is interlined. 



150 COLLEGE BOOK I 

said) be obliged to make good such Damage, and be liable to such 
further punishment as the President & Tutors shall think fitt. 

[200] 

7. The steward for the time being Shall mt[h] in fourteen days 
after the expiration of each quarter, draw out the quarter bill, & fill 
up the column of commons & siezings, and delivefr] the same to the 
Tutor whose turn it shall b[e] to make up such bill; who shall fill 
up the Other columns, according to Law or custom, and such adjust- 
ments agreeable thereto, as shall be made by the President and Tutors, 
and then shall present to the President, who with said Tutor, shall 
sign said bill; and the said Tutor shall enter the Said bill Immedi- 
ately in the College Book of quarter bills, after which x he shall deliver 
it to the steward, who shall demand of each scholar the whole of what 
he is therein charged with. 

8. Whereas great damage has been sustained by the Scholars not 
seasonably Paying their College dues; it is ordered, y 1 if any Scholar 
shall neglect to pay his quarterly Charges, for the space of three 
months after the quarter Bill is signed ; he shall (upon complaint made 
by the steward, to the President & Tutors) be dismis'd from the 
College, and shall not be restored, but with the Approbation, of the 
Corporation, and upon full satisfaction given for all damages sus- 
tained by such Neglects. 

9. The Butler shall wait upon the President at the Hours for 
prayer in the Hall, for his Orders to ring the Bell ; and also upon the 
Professors for their Lectures, as usual; he shall likewise ring the 
bell for commons according to custom, and at 2 five a clock in y 6 
morning, & -at nine at night. And the said Buttler for these and 
Other Services (to which no particular reward is assign'd) shall be 
Allow'd Sixteen [ 201 ] pounds per Annum, to be paid by the Under- 
graduates, and charged in their quarter bills. 

10. The Butler shall pay to the College from time to time, for 
Absent commons, as the Corporation shall Appoint, The Butler shall 
have liberty to sell Cyder to the Scholars, at such prices as the corpora- 
tion shall Appoint, He shall Also from time to time as there shall be 



1 The first "h" in this word is interlined. 

2 The word "at" is interlined. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 151 

Occasion, provide candles for the Hall, and shall take care that the 
Hall & entry adjoining be sweept once a day, and washed at least 
once a Quarter. And that the Tables and forms be scowred once a 
week (except in the winter season when they shall be scowred once 
in three weeks, or so often as the Tutors shall require it) for which 
he shall have such Allowance as the President and Tutors shall 
Appoint, to be paid by the undergraduates, & charged in their quar- 
ter] bills. 

Chapter 8 th Concerning Miscellaneous Matters. 

1. The Chambers and studies in y e College x shall be disposed of 
to the Scholars, Graduates & undergraduates, at y e Discretion of 
the President and Tutors. 

2. Undergraduates shall dwell, & 2 lodge in the Chambers Assigned 
to them; and If any Neglect to Observe this Law, they shall be 
punished by fine, not exceeding five shillings, or by Admonition, 
Degradation, or expulsion, according to the Aggravation of the 
Offence. 

3. While a study stands assigned to any graduate, he shall pay 
rent for it; and If he does not possess and statedly Use it, within 
two months After it is Assigned to him; or if After he has possesed 
it, he discontinues three months from statedly Using it, he shall be 
Liable to Have it taken away by the President & Tutors. 3 

[202] 

4. Every Scholar Graduate & Undergraduate shall find his pro- 
portions of furniture, wood and Candles, during the whole time of 
his having a Study assigned to him, whether 4 he be present or Absent. 

5. If -asy- Bachelours or Masters, set an example of Idleness, 
extravagance, 5 Neglect of publick worship, or religious exercises in 
the Hall, or Allow disorders in their chambers, or Shew contempt 
to any of the Laws or Governours of the College ; and After Admoni- 

1 The words "in y e College" are interlined. 

2 "&" is interlined. 

8 Though the last line of page [201], containing the words " by the President 
& Tutors," has been trimmed off, it is decipherable. 
4 The first " h" in this word is written over " e." 
s Altered from " extra vigance." 



152 COLLEGE BOOK I 

tion by the President and Tutors, do not reform, their chambers shall 
be taken from them, and they shall not be Allow'd to reside any longer 
in the College. And the President, or any two or more of the Tutors, 
are hereby empow'red and Directed to visit the Chambers of the 
Graduates, or send for them, to come before them for inquiry, ex- 
amination or Admonition, as Occasion, shall require; and If any 
Graduate shall deny entrance into his chamber or study, to the Presi- 
dent or two of the Tutors, or shall refuse or Neglect to come when 
sent for, he shall be punished in manner as Aforesaid. 

6. If the President or a Tutor, shall demand entrance into any 
Undergraduates chamber or Study, and it be denyed him, such 
Undergraduate Shall be degraded, rusticated, or expell'd And in 
this case or any other * wherein the good of the College, is by said 
President or Tutor thought to require it, the President or Tutor may 
break open any Chamber or Study door, except the Doors of a Grad- 
uate, which shall not be done, but by the President or 2 two of . y e 
Tutors. 

7. The President or Tutors may require suitable Assistance from 
any Scholar or Scholars, for [ 203 ] the preservation of the good order 
of the College and if any one so required shall refuse or Neglect to 
give his Assistance, It Shall be look'd upon as an high Misdemeanour, 
and a great contempt of y e Authority of the College, and be punished 
by Admonition, rustication, degradation or expulsion. 3 

8. The Monitors of the Hall Shall be chosen by y e President and 
Tutors; and their Stipend be Appointed by the Corporation, to be 
charged upon the Undergraduates in their quarter bills. 

9. To excite Tutors from time to time, to the greate[r] care and 
fidelity, in their work, those who shall be chosen Tutors, Shall be 
chosen for the terme of three Years, only ; at the Expiration whereof, 
a New Election shall be made by the Corporation, and Presented to 
the Overseers for their Acceptance. 

10. The professors Shall constantly reside -a£ in Cambridge Near 
the College; and the Tutors in the College. And the Corporation 
shall from time to time, determine what chamber^] shall be Tutors 
Chambers, (and also which shall be Professors chambers when resid- 



1 Apparently altered from "others." 

2 Substituted for "and, " crossed out. 

a The letter "n" in this word is interlined. 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1734 153 

ing \[n] College) as they Shall Judge most commodious for them to 
inspect the Scholars and prevent disorders. 

11. Whereas thro long Experience, former orders have not been 
Effectual, for preventing of Damages to the College, by the violence 
or carelessnesfs] of those (for whose accomidations, great cost and 
charges have from time to time been Expended, it is Ordered y* when 
any damage (except by inevitable Providence of God) shall be found 
done to any Chamber or Study inhabited, the person or persons, to 

.2 1 

whom said Chamber or Study belongs, shall make good the same 
[ 204 ] And when any damage is done, to any Other parts of the Col- 
lege, or to any of its Appurtenances, Such as fences, pump, Clock 
& c y e same shall be made good again by all * the Undergraduates, 
and shall be charged in their quarter bills. Provided always If the 
person or persons that were 2 the cause or biameable Occasion of such 
damage done, be discovered, he or they shall make good full Satis- 
faction for the same, and Shall be also liable to such punishment by 
fine or Otherwise, According to the demerit of the fact, as the Presi- 
dent and Tutors shall think fitt. 

12. That none belonging to the College, except the President, 
Fellows, Professors, & Tutors, Shall by threats; or blows compel a 
Freshman, or any Undergraduate, to any Duty or Obeidience; and 
if any Undergraduate shall Offend against this Law; he shall be 
liable to have the Priveledge of sending Freshmen taken from him, 
by the President and Tutors, or to be degraded or expell'd according 
to the Aggravation of y e Offence. Neither shall any senior scholars, 
Graduates, or Undergraduates, send any freshmen on errands in 3 
studying 4 hours, without leave from one of the Tutors, his own Tutor 
If in Town College If any Bachelour or Undergraduates shall trans- 
gress in 5 this Matter; 6 he shall be punished by the President, or Tutors 
not exceeding three Shillings for each Offence. 

13. If any undergraduate Refuse 7 or neglect 8 to come when sent 

1 The word "all" is interlined. 

2 Substituted for a word crossed out. 
8 Altered from "on." 

4 The letter " y " in this word is interlined. 

5 The word "in" is interlined. 

6 Apparently altered from some undecipherable word. 

7 The word "Refuse" is written over "or Graduate," the word "Graduate" 
being erased. 

8 The words "or neglect" are interlined. 



154 COLLEGE BOOK I 

for by the President, a Tutor or Professor; he shall be punished by 
Admonition, degradation or expulsion according to the Aggravation 
of the Offence. 

14. If any Scholar Graduate or Undergraduate [205 ] make resist- 
ance to the President or any of the Professors or Tutors ; Such Scholar 
shall be liable to Degradation or expulsion. And if any Scholar offer 
violence, or any heinous insult, to any of the Governours of the 
College, he shall be forthwith expelled. 

15. No Undergraduate shall keep a Gun or pistol in the College, 
or any where in Cambridge; nor shall he go a guning, fishing, or 
Seating over deep waters, without leave from the President or one of 
the Tutors, under the penalty of three Shillings. And if any scholar 
shall fire a Gun or pistol, within the College walls Yard, or near 
the College; he shall be fined not exceeding ten Shillings; or be 
admonishe[d] degraded or expelled, according to the Aggravation of 
the Offence. 

16. If any Scholar shall be convicted of fighting with, striking or 
wilfully hurting any perso[?i] he shall be fined by the President, or 
one of the Tutors, not exceeding five Shillings, or be Admonished, 
degraded, or expelled, according to the Aggravation of the Offence. 

17. No Scholar who * has been expelled the College shall be read- 
mitted by the President, Tutor[s] and Professors, without the consent 
of the Corporation. 

18. All fines above five shillings (except in y e cases already pro- 
vided for) and all publick Admonitions, Rustications & degradations, 
either in the same class or to a Lower class, 2 shall be by the President 
and Tutors; and all expulsions by the President, professors, and 
Tutors, and in all foremen tioned, cases, the determination shall be 
made by the major part of em the President having a Casting vote. 

19. Whereas Scholars may be guilty of disorders [206] or mis- 
demeanours, against which no provision is made by the foregoing 
Laws ; in all Such cases, the 3 President with y e Tutors shall inflict 
such punishment, as they think proper, According to the Nature and 
degree of the Offence. And in all punishments below expulsion, 



1 Substituted for "that," crossed out. 

2 This word has apparently been altered. 

• The letters " th " in this word are written over " w.' 



INSTRUCTION IN HEBREW, 1735 155 

more than one may be inflicted for the same crime, according to the 
Aggravations of it. 1 

The above Body of Laws were entred in this Book by Bridge, 
Sophimore. June. 25. 1734. & compar'd with y e original by y e Presi- 
dent, June. 26. 1734. 

The above Body of Laws were published in the College Hall, y e 
Hon d & Rev nd overseers, & corporation 2 being present, (as well as 
y e members of y e College) on Sept. 24. 1734. 

At a meeting of y e President & Fellows of Harvard College 
at Cambridge. Sept. 30. 1735. 

After some orders for y e paying M r Monis for printing his Hebrew 
Gramar it follows 

That y e price of said Hebrew Grammar be fourteen shillings a piece ; 
and y* y e present Sophimores, and y e Freshmen from time to time, 
shall each of them be furnish'd with one of said Grammars at y e 
price aforesaid, to be charged to them in their Quarter Bills. That 
all Freshmen for y e future, shall attend y e Hebrew Instructions at 
y e begining of y e last Quarter ; and y * they and y e other Undergradu- 
ates attend said Hebrew Instructions, at such times & so often, as y e 
Corporation shall determine. 

Mem. ys law was confirm'd by y e Overseers y e same day, they 
then sitting in y e Library. 3 

[ 207-249 4 ] 

[354 5 ] 



1 The hand of Bridge ends here. 

2 The words "& corporation" are interlined. 

3 All the paragraphs, from the conclusion of the Laws to this point, are in the 
hand of President Wadsworth. 

4 Pages [207-249] are blank except that at the top of page [233] are written 
the words "In nomine." 

B After page [249] the only entry made in the proper way is on page [354], 
hence this entry is printed here. All entries between page [249] and page [354] 
have been made by inverting the book. Hence the pages between page [249] 
and page [354] are printed in inverse order. 



156 COLLEGE BOOK I 

1643 * M r Pelham chosen Treasurer 

Thomas Danforth 
1669 John Richards 

[ 353-273 2 ] 

[ 272 »] 

Richard us Bellinghamus Armiger 4 hos Libros dedit.* 

Arresiu 6 in N. Tett. 
Anatomij Armenianism. 7 
Augustinj opa. 
Biblia Tremelij & Junij 
Cartwright on Prov: Eccles: 8 
Curiel in Epistola Thomse 
Gouges Sacrifice of S ts . 
Grotium de jure bellj. 
Lutherum in Genesin. 
Marlorati 9 thesaurum Scriptural. 
Molinseum contra Arminium. 10 
Mollerum in Psalmos. 
Musculum in Psalmos. 
Polanj Syntagma. 
Reinoldum de Idololatria. 
Stultetj Opa. 
Stella in Lucam. 
Vortium de Deo. 

in Psalmos. 

Coment in Philemonem. 



i Between "1643" and"M r " a date — apparently " 1643, " then altered to 
"1743" — has been crossed out. 

2 Pages [353-273] are blank. 

» In the lists of books on pages [272, 268, 264-260, 259, 250], the names and 
titles are printed exactly as written, so far as they can be deciphered, the usual 
practice in regard to words in Latin being departed from in these instances. 

4 The word "Armiger" is interlined. 

e This list is in the hand of YY. 

6 All the letters in this word, except the first letter, have been written over 
other letters, crossed out. 

7 The eighth and ninth letters in this word are interlined. 

8 One or two words are here crossed out. 

* The second "a" in this word has been altered. 
10 The letter f'u" in this word has been altered. 



BOOKS GIVEN BY PETER BULKLEY 157 

[ 271-269 l ] 

[268] 

Ecclesise Concordiensis 2 Presbyter, Petrus Bulkleius, 
hos Libros Dedit. 3 

iEnese Sylvij 4 opa 

Ambrosij Tomum 4 um 

Analysin typica. 

Antonij Histor. 5 ta partem 

Argum* InstituCUil impaliu 

Aquinas in Joh. Evang. 

Basil Lat. 

Birgitt 4a- Revelationes Sanctse. 

Bonavent 2 a Pars. 

Britannise Origo- 

Canj Locj Comunes. 

Camdenj descriptio Britannia?. 

Cro. Vspgensis. 

Danseum de Antichto. 

Dionysij opa. 

Epiphanium Grsec. & Lat. 

Erasmum in N. Test. 

Euthmium in Psalmos. 

Flaccj. Argo. 

Gersonis opu 3* Parte Inventoriu. 

Hillarij Pict Opa 

Histor. Eccless. 

Jacobum Rege Angl. Contra Magia. 

Lutherti in Genesin. 

Minoritanum in Luca. 

Munsterj Cosmogr. 

Originis Tomum 2^ 3 um & 4 um 

Pontificiale. 

Rationale Divj 



1 Pages [271-269] are blank. 

2 Apparently a letter in this word between "c" and "o" has been crossed 
out. 

3 The tops of some of the letters have been trimmed off, but all words are 
legible. This list is in the hand of Y Y. 

* Altered from "Sylvse." 



158 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Sacrj Canonis Expositionem. 
Volatteranj Conient. 
Reru Britannicaru 
ChronomTcon Divinti 
Adams banquet of ye Divill. 
De Vnione Ecclesise. 

[ 267-265 l ] 

[264] 

Catalogus Libroru quos dedit Dominus He™rtuf ' Collegij 
hujus Patronus. 3 

1 Ambrosij Dixionariu. 

2 Antonius & Gralerus in Seneca 

3 Abernethyes physick for the soule. 

4 Analysis Apocalypse&>s. 

5 Angloru prselia. 

6 Aquinatis Opa. Conclusiones. 

7 Aynsworts workes 

8 Amesij Theologian Medulla. De Consc: In Epistolas Petrj. contra 
Armin: Bellarminus Enervatus. 

9 Augustinj meditationes. Opa. 

10 Alstedij Physica Harmonia. Compendiu Thelogise. 

11 Apeius in Nov. Testam*. 

12 Anatomy Arminianisme. 

13 Anchorani porta linguarum. 

14 Actus Synodi Nationalis. 

15 Acta Synodalia. 4 

16 Aschamj Epistolae. 

17 Arraingm* of the whole Creature. 

18 Alicalj Emblemata. 

19 iEsopi fabulse. 



i Pages [267-265] are blank. 

2 "Harvardus" has been written over "Hervertus." 

3 Underneath the heading is written in pencil : " Is not this Dunster's hand- 
writing?" The words are now so faint as scarcely to be seen. The hand, how- 
ever, is that of YY and not that of Dunster. The number preceding each title 
is written in pencil, and is here retained for convenience. 

4 Between 15 and 16 a word has been crossed out. 



BOOKS GIVEN BY JOHN HARVARD 159 

20 iEgidius in Arist. Philos. & Metaph. 

21 Academia Gallica. 

22 * BcutiAikov Satpov 

23 Bezse Test. N. cu Annotat. Test. Grsec. Lat. In Epist. ad Galat:. 
Epie. 

24 Baynes on Collos:. Ephes. 

25 Bethneri Gram: Hebrsea. 

26 Berchetj Catechismus. 

27 Buxtorfi. Dixionar. Hebr:. Gram: hebr:. 

28 Beton displaying of y e popish Masse. 

29 Bellarmin. de fselicitate sanctorti. In Psalm. In l 5 & 2 5 Epist: 
ad Thessalon. Conciones. 

30 Bolton 2 in 4 volumnes. 

31 Ball on faith 

32 Bastingius on Palatines Catechisme. 

33 Brerewood on the Sabbath. 

34 Bacons advancem*. Essayes. 

35 Bannes in Arist: de Gen: & Corrup. 

36 Bovilij Adagia. 

37 Bedae Axiomata Philosophica. 

38 Brentius de parabolis. 

39 Beards theatre of Gods judgm t3 . 

40 Brerewoods Tractatus Logicus. 

41 Brentij Pericopse &c. 

42 Bullingerus in Isaj. 

43 Biblia Tremelij & Junij. 

44 Bucani Institutiones. 

45 Bradshewes prparation for 3 the Sacram*. 

46 Broughton 4 on the revelat : on Eccles. Positions -e£ on the Bible. 
On Daniel, texts of Script. 5 chronol. 6 pamphlets 

47 Baylyes directions for health. 

48 Calvinus in Pent & Joshua. Sermons vpon Job in English. p r lec- 
tiones in Ezechiel. Institut. Religio. Christ. Tomus 4 US opu 



1 A word has here been crossed out. 

2 Altered from "Boltons." 

3 Apparently altered from " of." 

4 This word has apparently been altered. 
6 A letter or two is here crossed out. 

6 A letter or two is here crossed out. 



160 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Theologicorti. Harmonia. In Prophetas min: Homilia in Sam- 
uelem. In Epistolas Paulj. In Psalm. 

49 Camararij meditationes histor. 

50 Corradj Casus Consc. 

51 Church his God & man. Goodmans treasure. 

52 Camdens remaines. 

[263] 

53 Cedenares [ ] l 

54 Chysostinj homilia 

55 Castanej Distinctiones. 

56 Calliopseia. 

57 Chrystopolitanj 2 opa. 

58 Christianity. 

59 Cornerj Psalteriu Lat: 

60 Curiel in Epist. Thomae. 

61 Chareus in Epist. 

62 Cornelius de artibus & Scientijs. In Eccles :. Prophetas majores, & 
minores. in Pent, in Epist: Paulj. in Acta. In Prov. in 7 vol. 

63 Clavis grsec: Linguae. 

64 Comentariu in Horatiu in Fol. 

65 Coment: in 4 Euangel. & Acta Apost. On the Prov. 

66 Cottons concordance. 

67 Coment in Arist. Phys. de anima. 

68 Cartwright in Eccles. & Prov. 

69 Collection of statutes. 

70 Conradus in Apocalyp. 

71 Carlton ag 81 Pelag. & Armin. 

72 Chytreus in Apocal. in Levit. in Genes. Numer. in Deut. Ester. 
Judices in 6 Tom. 

73 Characciolus his life. 

74 Catin. Phrases. 

75 Danej opa Theolog. Questiones. de salutaribus dej donis. in Math, 
his comon Ethicks. 

76 Dickson on hebr. 

77 Dictionariii Anglic. Historicu. Gcograp. Poeticu. Lat. Grsec. 



1 This title, apparently consisting of two words, is trimmed off. The first 
word is doubtful. 

2 Altered from " Christopolitanej." 



BOOKS GIVEN BY JOHN HARVARD 161 

78 Douna his warfare. 1 

79 Davenantius in Epist. ad Collos. 

80 Duns 2 Scotus in 8 Libros Arist. Phys. 

81 Dove on the Cant. 

82 Dike on the hart, his mischeife of Scandalls. 

83 Death subdued. 

84 Elton on the Comandm ts . 

85 Epictetj Enchyridion. 

86 Eustachij Philosophia. 

87 Euphoranius. 

88 Erasmj Colloquia. 

89 Elegant Phases. 

90 Garden of Eloquence. 

91 Exon his meditations. 

92 Essayes morall & Theol. 

93 Francklin 6p6orov ms lib. 

94 Funebres Conciones 3 15. 

95 Fabritius in Hosea 4 

96 Felthoms resolues. 

97 Fuebernes lapidua Pasmaliensis. 

98 Fayus in Epist. ad Timoth. 

99 Feuardensius in Epist. ad Philemonem. 

100 Gualterus in Marcu. 

101 Golij Ethicae 

102 Griners in Dan. 

103 Goodwins Aggravation of sin. 

104 Household Phys: 

105 Haxions prselections. 

106 The honest man. 

107 Hunnius in Joh: Evangel. 

108 Hindersham of fasting, on the Psal. on John 4. 2 Tom. 

109 Hieronus in Haddanu in Isai. 

110 Horatius cu Stephanj notis. 

1 After this item is written in pencil V Escaped when the Library was burnt." 

2 A letter is here crossed out. 

3 Altered from " Consiones." 

4 Between 95 and 96 a title has been crossed out. 



162 COLLEGE BOOK I 

111 Hemmingius in 84 Psalm. 4ft- in Epist. ad Collos: 

112 Homers workes in English. 

113 History of the Church. 

114 Haylins Geography. 

[262] 

115 H[ 

116 Hutton * agst Coiiion prayer booke. 

117 Henshaws meditations 

118 Jackej Instit. Philos: 

119 Juvenalis. 

120 Isocratis Orat: Grsec & Latin. 

121 Judic: Synodi Nationalis. 

122 Keckermannj Philos. Disput. 

123 Keckermanj contemplat. de loco, et de terrae-motu. 

124 Lutherus in Genesin. Tomus l us , 2 US , 3 US , 4 US , 5 US , 6 l 

125 Luke Angl. 

126 Loscij Annotationes Scolasticse. 

127 Lightfoots Miscelanes. 

128 Lucanus. 

129 Lewes right vse of pmises. 

130 Lexicon Graeco Lat: 

131 Lemmius medicus de complexione. 

132 Londons complaint. 

133 Lamentations. 

134 Lord Vcrul : Nat : History. 

135 Livellj Vita & in Harding. 

136 Leigh on ye pmises. 

137 Lumberds Justice. 

138 Lycosthenjs 2 Apophthegmata. Similia. 
139 3 Loscij Questiones. 

140 Laurentij opa. 

141 Mollerus in Psalmos. 

142 Marloratj Thesaurus Scriptural. 



1 Altered from " Huttons." 

2 Altered from " Lycostlienes." 

3 Written " 138 " by mistake. 






BOOKS GIVEN BY JOHN HARVARD 163 



143 Musculus in Psalmos. Matthseu. 

144 Mollinseus contra Arminios. 

145 Marlotj Thesaurus Scripturse. 

146 Magirj Physica. Anthropologia. 

147 Maxes Sermons. 

148 Melanchj Logica 

149 Minshej Dictionariu. 

150 A Manuduction to Divinity. 

151 Martini j Gram: Hebr. 

152 Micomius in Marcu. 

153 Montanj in Psal. Prov 1 " Comt. & Hebr. 

154 Moses Vayled 



155 N. Test. Catholicj Expositio Eccles: 

156 Nichols mirrour for Magistrates. 

157 N. Test. Lat. 

158 Nonae Novemb. seternitatj consecrates. 

159 Natales Comes, in 29 Tomis. 

160 Osiandri Psalm. 

161 Philosophers Banquet. 

162 Pfaltsgraues Church. 

163 Polanj Syntagma Theologian. De Legendo cti fructu. 

164 Piscator 17 Tomis. 

165 Pelagius redivivus Prin. 

166 Plin. Nat. Hist. 

167 Plutarchj Vitee Angl. Moralia Angl. 

168 Philippi Homil: in Jonam. 

169 Pike his worthy worthy comunicant. 

170 Pareus de doctrina X iana . 

171 Phochenius. 

[261] 

172 Plau[*]us. 

173 Porcensis orationes. 

174 Pet. Martyr, in Epist. ad Rom. Loci Comunes. 

175 Piccolominej Philos. 

176 Patresius de Regin. & reg: Institutione. 

177 Persij * Satyrae. 



i Altered from "Parsij." 



164 COLLEGE BOOK I 

178 Politianj Epist. 

179 Passoris Lexicon. Graec. Lat. 

180 Pellegronj Sylva. 

181 Poetaru flores. 

182 Pars Workes. 

183 Pe cables workes. de origine formaru. 

184 Preston on ye Attributes. 4 Sermons. 

185 Physick for y 6 Soule. 

186 Pavenij Ethicse 
P 

187 Quirbj colnent: in Psalmos & Prophetas. 

188 Quarles Poems. 

189 Reinolds Vanity of y° Creature. Conference w th y* 5 hart. 

190 Rogers on Luke y e 15 

191 Rami Grseca Gram : Lat. Logica cu Talsej Rhetorica, Molinej Log. 
vno volum: 

192 Robinsons Essayes 

193 Royardus in Epist: Domin. 

194 Rogers, his Divinity. On Loue. 

195 Roxanee Tragedia. 

196 Reinoldi Liber de Idololatria. 

197 Stola in Luca. 

198 Scultetj opa. 

199 Schriblerj metaphorse. 

200 Schickardi gram. heeb. 

201 Sibbs fountaine sealed. 

202 Spongia contra Jesuit. Goloniu cu alijs opibus vno vol. compressis. 

203 Sphinx Philosophy. 

204 Speeds clowde l of wittnesses. 

205 Scalliger de subtilitate. 

206 Scheibleri philosoph. compend. 

207 Sebati Phys: 

208 Setonj Dialectica. 

209 Sarcerj Postilla. 

210 Soules preparation. 

211 Schenblerj 2 sententiae. 

i Altered from " Clouds." 
2 Perhaps " Scheublerj." 






BOOKS GIVEN BY JOHN HARVARD 165 

212 Salustius. 

213 Smiths Logicke. 

214 Scarfij Symphonia. 

215 Saluthij Schola. 

216 Sceiblerj Synopsis Philos. 

217 Saints Legacyes. 

218 Test. N. Grsec. 

219 Tossanj Diction. Hebr. 

220 Terentius. 

221 Touchstone of truth. 

222 Thrapuntij rhetorica. 

223 Thesaurus poeticus 

224 Textoris Epitheta. Epist. 

[260] 

225 Test. [ ] 

226 Twissus de gratia, potestate & Providentia. 

227 Taylour on Titus, on Revel. 12. 

228 Trunesse of X an religion. 

229 Turner] Orationes. 

230 Terus in Exod. Num. Deut. Josh. Jud. 

231 Thesaurus linguae rom: & Brittaniese in fol. 

232 Thomae Aquinatis opa. 

233 Tullij opa in 2 Tomis. de officijs 

234 Tyme well spent. 

235 Treasury of God. 

236 Vorsius de Deo. 

237 Vdalls Heb r Gram: 

238 Valerius Max: 

239 Vocatio Judaeoru. 

240 Warwicks Meditations. 

241 Wall on Acts 18. V s 28. 

242 Withers 

243 Weames 4 th Vol. of y* Image of God in man. on the Lawes 
morall, ceremoniall, Judiciall. 

244 Willsons X an Dictionary. 

245 Watsonj animae Gaudia. 



1G6 COLLEGE BOOK I 

246 Whakly his new birth. 

247 Wygandus de psec. piorti l exilijs. 

248 Wandelinj Contemplatio Phys. Tom 3. 

249 Wardes Sermons. 

250 Zanchij Opa. 

A 2 copy of M r Dunsters note given to M r Scotow 
Thes p r sents witnesse that wheras Joshuah Scottow of Bosto march* 
hath of his owne free accord procured for the library of Harvard 
Collef^] Henry Stephen his Thesaurus in foure volumes in folio, 
and bestowefd] the same theron : it is on this condieon, and w th this 
pmise following, that if ever the said Joshuah during his life shall 
have occasion to use the said booke or any parcell therof, he shall 
have free liberty therof, and accesee therto : and if God shall blesee 
the said Joshuah w th any child or childre that shal be students of 
the Greeke tongue, the the said bookes above specifyed shalbee unto 
them delivered, in case that they will not otherwise be satisfy ed 
w th out it. In witnesse wherof this p r sent writing is signed by me 
Henry Dunster p r sident of the - said Colledge abovesaid made at 
Boston, this twenty eight of the eight month 1649. 3 

Henrie Dunster 

Recevd of M r Vryan Oakes p r s[ ] y e above Expressed Thesaurus 
in foure volumes acc r ding to Condition aboue: upon the demand of 
my sonn Thomas Scottow I say received p r me this 30 th of August 

Josh: Scottow 4 

[259] 

Catalogus librorum ex dono illustriss Equitis D m Kenelmi Dighbij. 
an° Dni 1655. 5 

Biblia Sacra cum glossa ordinaria sex tomis comprehensa. 
Opera Gregorij Nazianzeni grseco-lat. duobus tomis in fol. 



i A word is here crossed out. 

2 This entry, including the signature "Henrie Dunster," is in the hand of 
President Chauncy. 

8 The figure " 1649 " is underscored. 

« This receipt is in the hand of Joshua Scottow. 

5 In the margin is written in pencil " Prest. Chauncys handwriting." 



BOOKS GIVEN BY JOHN WINTHROP 167 

Justini Martyris opera grsece\ 

Origenis opera. 

Concilioru tomi duo in fol. 

Hermes Trismegistus cu comentarijs Rosselij. in fol. 

Ludovici Blosij opera. 

Venerab. Bedse tomi 2. 

Johan. Damasceni opera Grseco-lat 

Anthonij Posse vini bibliotheca. 

Aluarez. torn. 3 US . 

Rob. Bell 1 tomi i duo 

Epitome Annaliu Baconij. 

Oecumenij 2 Opera in torn. 2 bus * 

Harphij 3 Theologia mystica. in 4°. 

Joh. Cassiani Opera, in 8° 

Cypriani opa in manibus M n Norto 

[ 258-251 4 ] 

[250] 

Julj : Johannes Winthropus Armiger Septies 5 Nov : Anglioo 
Gubernator, hos libros contulit. 6 

A French Bible. 

Bertholomseus de rem Natura. 

Catechismus p Cfrrtianse. 

Calvinj institutio religionis Cntianae. 

Chronologia in Livij 7 Historia. 

Christianography. 

Colloquiu Wormaliense institutu. 

The Comon prayer booke. 

Corwelij coment in Proverbia. 

Davenalij determinationes Questionu. 

Edmund B p of London his doctrin & homily es. 



1 Two words are here crossed out. 
3 The last letter in this word has been altered. 
3 The last letter in this word has been altered. 
« Pages [258-251] are blank. 

5 There is here a caret, but the word substituted for " Nov : Anglise " has 
been trimmed off. 

e This list is in the hand of ZZ. 

7 The last letter in this word has been altered. 



168 COLLEGE BOOK I 

Gregorij Decretalia. 

Grasserj coin 4, in Apocalypsin. 

Harris his Sermons. 

Hosee cu Thargo. in Hebr. 

Jones on Philemon & l Hebrewes. 

Jacobj Fabrij opa 

Juell agt Harding. Parliam*. 

Junius in Genesin. 

Lexicon grsecolatinu 

Livij Historia in 2 Tomis 

Ludovicj Homiliae in Jon: Libru 

Musculus in Matthseu 

N. Testam* w th Notes. 

Page on the Lords prayer 

Pashingij com* in Catachesm. 

Piccolominseus de arte definiendj & discur. 

Polanj Com 1 in deniclem 

Polidorj Historia anglicana 

Randalls Sermons on the Comunion. 

Ortus Sanitatis 

Sibthorpes advisem* to Catholickes in Ireland. 

Sermones discipulj decemp. 

Speculu Spiritualiu 

Suttons Lectures. 

Taylour on the parable of ye sower. 

Theatru terrse sanctse 

Whitakerj prselectiones. disputationes. 

The life of the Virgin Mary. 



Apparently written over another word or letter. 



i 



COLLEGE BOOK 
III 



NOTE 

The number of the College Book is given in the headline of every left- 
hand page. 

The heavy face figures within square brackets indicate the paging of 
the original. For details, see the Introduction to this volume. 

All entries, even when erased or crossed out in the original, are printed 
in the text, provided they are decipherable. 

Words crossed out are, if decipherable, printed in lined type; if not 
decipherable, the fact is stated in a footnote. Where an entire entry has 
been crossed out, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

Where a word has been crossed out and another word written above 
it, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

Where a word has been erased or altered, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

If a word or words are interlined, the fact is stated in a footnote. 

Words or letters supplied on account of torn page, illegibility, etc., are 
printed in italics within square brackets. A blank space within square 
brackets indicates that words or letters are either illegible or torn away. 

In entries written in Latin, abbreviations are expanded in italics, and 
letters omitted without marks of abbreviation are placed within square 
brackets. 

All entries in the original are in ink, unless otherwise specified in 
footnotes. 

A Glossary of terms requiring explanation is printed at the end of 
the volume, preceding the Index. 



HARVARD COLLEGE RECORDS 



TheColledge 1 Booke 2 N°3 s 

[1] 

At a Gen fl Court held at Boston Septemb. 8 th 1636 4 

The Court voted for the erecting a publick Schooll or Colledge in 
Cambridge, ffour hundred pounds, to be payd out of the Country 
Treasurye. 

The Reverend m r John Harvard sometimes Minister of Gods He dy'd soi 

time betw A 

Word at Charlstown 5 by his last Will & Testament gave towards and Deer 1638. 
the erecting the abovs d School or Colledge, th' one Moiety or halfe viz: septemt 
parte of his estate; the s d Moiety amounting to the sum of seven Pr 14 ' t o^ e ELto 
hundred seventy nine pound seventeene shillings and two pence. voL 1 - p - 460 

m r Thomas Adams and m r Christopher Coulson gave a Sum of 
money remaining as they informed in m r Theophilus Eatons hands, 
towards the erecting of the aboves d Colledge, the Sum was indefinite, 
their letter bearing date the 26 th of march : ffourty. the which mony 
was received by m r Nathaniel Eaton before their 9 letter was received. 

1 The letter " d " in this word is interlined. 

2 The words " The Colledge Booke," in an unknown hand, are written in 
large letters at the top of the first leaf of the original, which is unnumbered. The 
verso of that leaf is blank. On a fly leaf, opposite the first leaf of the original, 
is written in pencil : " These books bound in Pres* Quincy's day JLS" 

3 The words " N° 3 , " probably in the hand of President Wadsworth, are 
written in the upper right-hand corner. 

4 The entries on pages [1-85] of the text are, with the exceptions noted in 
the footnotes, in the hand of Treasurer Danforth. 

5 The name " Charlstown," apparently in the hand of Henry Flynt, is writ- 
ten in a space left blank by Danforth. 

6 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 

7 This marginal entry, in a different hand, is written in pencil. f'8 th " has 
been altered from " 7 th ." 

8 This marginal entry, in a different hand, is written in pencil. 

9 Apparently altered from "this." 



172 COLLEGE BOOK III 

The Lady Moulson gave towards the aboves d College One hundred 
pound & m r Bridges ffifty pound, which was payd in to the country 
Treasurer, with other small Gifts, amounting to twelve pound Sixteen & 
a groate, w^-do-The whole amounting to One hundred sixty two pounds 
Sixteen & a groate, for which the country doth remaine Debto r to this 
day : & for the same they have annually allowed to the Colledge ffifteen 
pounds, Commencing from the yeare Sixteene hundred ffourty & eight. 

[2] 

M r Nathaniel Eaton was chosen Professo r of the s d Schoole in the 
yeare One thousand six hundred thirty seaven, 2 to whose care the man- 
agement of the Donations before mentioned were betrusted for the 
erecting of such Edifices as were meet 3 and necessary for a Colledge, 
& for his own Lodgings : An account of his management whereof is 
as followeth 

M r Nathaniel Eatons Account under his own hand 

Inp r s. The frame in the Colledge yard & digging the cellar, car- 
riage & setting it up 120.00.00 

It m . ffencing the yard with pale 6 foot and £ high 030.00.00 

It. To the Mason Thomas King for Chimneys 006.00.00 

It. To the Smith payd for Jron Casements 002.00.00 

It. Part of the fframe for an outhouse '. . . . . 005.00.00 

It. ffelling, Squaring, Leading timber to be added 004 . 00 . 00 

It. Leading Stone & clay for underpinning 001.10.00 

It. ffor thirty Apple-Trees & setting them 006.00.00 

It. ffor Bricks provided & layd in place 003 . 10 . 00 

It. Payd by me to the Carpenter for additions to be made to the 
frame already raised, beside the 20 a received by virtue of a note 

from yo r Selfe to m r Allen 108.00.00 

It. In part of payment for lime to be burnt for the Colledge . . 001 .00.00 

It. ffor unloading the Timber prepard for y e Addition : 003. 10. 00 4 

It for 250 Cedar boards w th the Carriage of them: 010.10.00 5 

SumTotall 301.00.00 

Received of m r Allen 200.00.00 

Remains due 101.00.00 

1 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. The references 
are to pages [62, 49, 50, 76, 82] of the text, or pages 225, 215, 216, 246, 252, 
of this volume. 

3 Written over " eight/' erased. 

3 The first letter in this word has apparently been altered. 

4 The figure "003" has been altered, 
e The figure "010" has been altered. 






BOARD OF OVERSEERS REORGANIZED, 1642 173 

[3] 

M r Nathaniel Eaton appearing in the Court held at Boston, in 
September, Sixteen hundred thirty nine, & being there convicted of 
sundry abuses & inhumane severityes by him acted towards the 
schollars under his charge, was openly sentenced & removed from his 
abovs d Trust. 

The care of carrying on the building begun by m r Eaton, was then 
committed to the mannagement of m r Samuel Shepard and the Col- 
lege Stock putt into his hand. 

At a meeting of the Magistrates and Elders at Boston. 
27. of August. 1640. 

The Reverend m r Henery Dunstar was by them invited to accept 
the place of President of the Colledge, which he accordingly accepted, 
to whom was committed the care & trust for finishing of the Colledge 
buildings and his own lodgings & the Custody of the Colledge Stock, 
& such Donations as might further be added to the Jncrease thereof. 
An Account whereof he presented to the Overseers of the Colledge & 
is on file with the Colledge Records. 

At a Gen H Court held at Boston in the yeare 1642. 

Whereas through the good hand of God upon us, there is a Colledge 
founded in Cambridge in the County of Middlesex, called Harvard 
Colledge [4] for the encouragement whereof, this Court hath given the 
Sum of flour hundred pounds, and alsoe the Revenue of the fferry be- 
twixt Charlstowne & Boston ; and that the well ordering & managing 
of the s d Colledge is of great concernement — 

Jt is therfore ordered by this Court & the Authority thereof, That 
the Governo r & Deputy Gov 1 " for the time being and all the Magis- 
trates of this Jurisdiction, together with the teaching Elders of the Six 
next adjoyning Towns, viz*. Cambridge, Watertowne, Charlstowne 
Boston, Roxbury and Dorchester and the President of the s d College 
for the time being, shall from time to time have full powr & authority 
to make & establish all such orders, Statutes & constitutions as they 
shall see necessary for the Instituting Guiding & furthering of the s d 
Colledge & members thereof, from time to time in piety morality & 
learning as also to dispose order & manage to the use & behoof of the 



174 COLLEGE BOOK III 

said Colledge & y e members thereof 1 all Gifts, Legacies bequeathes, 
Revenues, Lands & Donations as either have been, are or shall be 
conferred, bestowed or any ways shall fall or come to the s d Colledge. 
And whereas it may come to pass, that many of the s d Magistrates & 
s d Elders may be absent or otherwise imployed about other weighty 
affaires, when the s d Colledge may need their p r sent help & counsell, 
Jt is therfore ordered that the greater Number of Magistrates & 
Elders, which shall be p r sent with the President, shall have the 
power of the whole. Provided that if any Constitution, Order or 
Orders by them made shall be found hurtfull to the s d Colledge or 
the Members thereof, or to the weall-publick, then upon Appeal of 
the party or partyes greived, unto the Company of Overseers first 
mentioned, they shall repeal the s d order or orders (if they shall see 
cause) at their next meeting or stand accountable thereof to the 
next Gen K Court. 

ffor the furnishing of the Colledge with a Library that might be of 
publick use to the Students therein, the Hon d Magistrates & Rev d 
Elders gave towards the same out of their own libraryes to the vallue 
of Two hundred pound. 

[5] 

M r Henry Pooll gave towards the Colledge ten pound 

M r Theophilus Eaton gave towards the building the edifices of the 
Colledge ffourty pound. 

M r Richard Russell gave towards the finishing of the Colledge 
Edifices nine pound. 

M r Edward Jackson gave toward the finishing of the edifices Ten 
pound. 

M r Wory 2 gave four pound. 

M r Parish Merch* gave three pound. 

M r Joss : Glover gave to the Colledge a ffont of printing Letters 
io the Collodgc. 



1 The words between " members thereof," ( page 173) and " all Gifts," 
(page 174) are interlined in a later hand, probably that of Henry Flynt. 

2 The first letter is written over " Ed" or "EL" The name as printed in 
the text is doubtful, but "Wory" is the form in the Donation Book compiled 
for the use of the Corporation in 1773 and also in Quincy's History of Harvard 
University (i. 458). 



i 



COLLEGE SEAL APPOINTED, 1643 175 

Some Gentlemen of Amsterdam gave towards the furnishing of a 
Printing-Press with Letters gave fourty nine pound & somthing more. 

M r William Hibbons, M r Thomas Weles, & M r Hugh Peters, 
procured from diverse Gentellmen & merchants in England towards 
the furnishing of the Library with book to the vallue of an hundred & 
fifty pound. 

M r Hobart Schoolmaster at gave Two & Twenty pound 

The Rev d M r * Greenhill minister of Gods word at 

Stepney gave seven pound. 

M r George Glover gave two pound. 

M r Bridges, M r Greenhill & M r Glover gave to s d Colledge as many 
Utensills as amounted l to Twenty pounds. 

A Gentleman (not willing his name should be putt upon Record) 
gave ffifty pound. 

M r Willis Merch* at Boston gave seven pound. 

[6] 

Cap* Weles of Roxbury gave gave ten pound 

M r Israel Stoughton of Dorchester gave ffive pound 

M r Richard Parker of Boston Woollen-Draper gave ffour pound. 

M r John Pratt of Hartford gave ffour pound 

His Majesties Colony of the Massachusets Bay, with His Ma ties 
Colonies of Plimouth, Hartford & New haven in the Space of Eight 
years gave for the benefitt of y e Schollars Two hundred & ffifty pound 
& more : vide, the particular account of the Sums brought to y e Coll : 
from each Colony, page 10. 2 

At a meeting of the Gov r no r s of Harvard Colledge held in the Col- 
ledge Hall the 27. Decembr 1643 Herbert Pelham Esq r was Elected 
Treasurer of the s d Society. Also it was then ordered that two Batch- 
elo r s should be appoynted to help the President to read to the Jun r 
Pupills & be allowed to each of them for their pains ffour pound per 
annum out of the Colledge Treasury. S r Bulkeley & S r Downing were 
nominated & appoynted for that service to continue for One year. 

A Common Seale for the Colledge was then also appoynted in forme 
following 

1 The first three letters in this word have been altered. 

2 The reference is to page [10] of the text, or pages 179-180 of this volume. 



176 COLLEGE BOOK III 

The College 1 Seal 2 

[7] 

December 10. 1646 

The Reverend M r Nathaniel Ward gave to the College. 3 A ffarme 
of Six hundred Ac r s lying upon Merimacke River neer Andevor- 
Town. The Grant whereof stands Recorded the 22 d 4 of y e 2 mo . 1647 
by William Aspinall then Record 1 ", and he was allowed twenty pounds 
due for his Sonnes expences in Coll : 

M r Jsrael Stoughton of Dorchester gave by his last Will to the Col- 
ledge a Legacy in Lands, the words of the will are as followeth, 

Hereby J do further give as followeth; Vnto Harvard Colledge in 
Cambridge, J do give Two hundred ac r s of land out of my purchased 
lands on the northeast side of Naponset, about moth r Brooks, that 
is on the utmost bounds of my farme next to Dorchester Town all my 
grants & purchases on that side being layd together to my ffarmes as 
the Town hath allway promised mee. So Some meadow & some up- 
land about mother Brooks, may in time be somthing worth towards 
the Advancing of Learning; And One hundred ac r s more J give to the 
same use out of my dues on the blue Hill side, provided the Town will 
allow it to ly in due opposition to the farme Two hundred, that the 
River only may part them; that is Three hundred ac r s to the use 
afores d to remaine to the Colledge use for ev r . The Court to choose one 
man & my executo r s another & they two a third to lay this out so as it 
may be most equall for the good of the College & with least preju- 
dice to my other land. 

Majo r Robert Sedgwick of Charlstowne gave to the Colledge a 
Shop in Boston standing by William Phillips house rented to Wil- 
liam Taylor at ten Shilling a yeer 

1 The scribe began to write " Colledge," got as far as " Colledg," then erased 
the upper curl of " d," turning the lower part into " g," and erased " g," writing 
" e " over it. These three words, not in the hand of Treasurer Danforth, are 
in the same hand that wrote the words "The Colledge Booke" on the recto of 
the first leaf of College Book III: see page 171 of this volume. 

3 Here is attached to the page an impression of the Seal reproduced in 
facsimile facing this page. It is a different Seal from that on page [27] of 
College Book I. See page 16, above. 

3 The letter "g " in this word has been altered from "d." 

* Altered from " 22^." 



r 



i) 



i 




&§& 



^ 



FORMS FOE CONFERRING DEGREES, ETC. 177 

[8] 

Presentatio Bacalaureorum 

Honorandi viri, vosque Reverendi Presbyteri! 

Presento vobis 1 hosce juvenes,quos scio tarn doctrina, quam moribus 
idoneos esse, ad primum in Artibus gradum suscipiendum pro more 
Academiarum in Anglia. 

Admissio Bacalaureorum. 

Admitto te ad primum gradum in Artibus. sc. ad respondendum 
Questioni pro more Academiarum in Anglia. 

Tibiqwe trado hunc librum una cum potestate publice prselegendi 
(in aliqua Artium. quam profiteris) quotiescunqwe ad hoc munus 
evocatus fueris. 

Presentatio Magistrorum. 

Honorandi Viri, Vosqwe Reverendi Presbyteri! 

Presento Vobis hosce viros quos scio tarn doctrina quam moribus 
esse idoneos ad incipiendum in Artibus pro more Academiarum in 
Anglia. 

Admissio Inceptorum. 

Admitto te ad secundum gradum in Artibus pro more Academiarum 
in Anglia. 

Tibiqwe trado hunc librum una cum potestate profitendi ubi- 
cunqwe ad hoc 2 munus publice evocatus fueris. 

Formula admittendi Socios. 

Primo. Prsebebis omnimodam debitam Reverentiam Honorandis 
Magistratibus ac Reverendis Presbyteris et Prsesidi; Collegii In- 
spectoribus. 

2. Religiose in te suscipies curam dum hie commoraberis ob- 
servandi singulas salutares leges, statuta & Privilegia hujus socie- 
tatis, quantum in te situm est; atque etiam ut observentur ab om- 
nibus hujus Collegii membris in singulo uniuscujusqwe munere. 

3. Omnes & singulos Studentes qui Tutelse tuse committuntur, aut 



1 The second letter in this word has been altered. 

2 The second letter in this word has perhaps been altered. 



178 COLLEGE BOOK III 

in posterum committendi sunt, ut promoveas in omni tarn divina, 
quafh humana litteratura, pro suo cujusqwe captu, atque ut moribus 
honeste ac inculpate se gerant, 1 summopere curabis. 

[9] 

4. Sedulo prospicies ne quid detrimenti Collegium capiat, quantum 
in te situm est, sive in ejus sumptibus, sive in aedificio & structura, 
ffundis, proventibus, caeterisqwe omnibus, quae nunc ad Collegium 
pertinent, aut dum hie egeris pertinere possint. 

Quod etiam ad nos (Collegii Inspectores) spectat pollicemur nos 
tibi non defuturos esse, quibuscunqwe tua intererit : Imo vero te con- 
firmabimus authorite 2 ac potestate nostra in omnibus tuis legitimis 
administrationibus, contra quoscunqwe contumaces. Et pro Collegii 
facultatibus erogabimus tibi Idonea Stipendia (i. e. pro modulo nostro) 
quae sufficiant ad victum & amictum & litteraturam tuam promo- 
vendam. 

Formula admittendi Scholares iEdiles. 

1. Praebebis omnimodam debitam Reverentiam honorandis magis- 
tratibus ac Reverendis Presbyteris et Presidi Collegii una cum Socius 
singulis. 

2. Debitam dilligentiam Studiis incumbendo adhibebis, Studiis 
(inquam) Linguarum & Artium liberalium, obsequendo Tutori tuo 
et Salutaribus ejus praeceptis, quamdiu in Statu pupillari versatus 
fueris in hoc Collegio. 

3. Religiose in te suscipies curam, durh hie commoraberis obser- 
vandi singulas salutares leges, statuta & privilegia, hujus societatis, 
quantum in te situm est: atque etiam ut observentur ab omnibus 
hujus Collegii membris in singulo uniuscujusque munere fideliter 
curabis. 

4. Sedulo prospicies, ne quid detrimenti Collegium capiat, quantum 
in te situm est, sive in ejus sumptibus, sive in edificiis et structura, 
fund is, proventibus, fenestris, csetevisque omnibus quae nunc ad Colle- 
gium pertinent, aut dum hie egeris pertinere possunt 



1 The letter "a" in this word has perhaps been altered. 

2 Written for "authoritate." The word is broken at "authori" by the end 
of a line, and the scribe went on to write "te," forgetting "ta." 






MONEY CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE COLLEGE 



179 



Quod ad * nos, Praesidem sc. & Socios, pertinet pollicemur nos tibi 
non defuturos, quibuscunqwe nostra intererit, imo vero in studiis 
tuis & pietate progressum, quantum in nobis fuerit, promovebimus. 



10] 

A more particular Accompt of the contributions made by the 
severall colonies aforenamed 2 in 3 pag. 6. 4 followeth. 



Massachusetts 



Boston 43i-r 
Salem . . 
Charlstown 
Watertowne 
Lyn . . . 
Ipswich 
Dorchester 
Concord . 
Dedham . 
Cambridge 
Brantrey . 
Glocester . 
Mauldon . 
Rowley 
Roxbury . 
Springfield 
Newbury . 
Oburne . . 
Sudbury . 
Weymouth 
Hingham . 
Salisbury . 
Hampton . 
Andevo 1 " . 
Haverill . 



11 s dob 

. 84.18. 7.2 
. 00.00. 
. 37.16. 2.0 
. 00.00. 
. 01.00.00.0 
. 05.00.00.0 
. 04.06.00.0 
. 08.17.04.0 
. 04.06.06.0 
. 02.15.03.2 
. 05.04.03.0 
. 00.12.00.0 
. 00.12.06.0 
. 07.08.07.2 
. 16.18.03.0 
. 03.00.00.0 
. 01.10.00.0 
. 05.13.07.2 
. 01.04.03.0 
. 00.00.00 
. 00.00.00 
. 00.00.00 
. 00.00.00 
. 00.00.00 



191.03.5.0 s 



Hartford 



(Hartford . 
J Mi Saybrook 
Windsor 






. . 30.17. 0.0 
. . 02.09. 0.0 
. . 05.15. 0.0 



039. 01. 0.0 8 



1 The second letter in this word has been altered. 

2 A word or letter is here crossed out. 

3 This word has been altered. 

4 The reference is to page [6] of the text, or page 175 of this volume. 
6 The figures have been altered. 

6 The figure K 039 " has been altered. 



180 COLLEGE BOOK III 



f] 



New haven 17.11.09.0 

New haven. J Millford 10.15.06.0 

J Stratford 06.14.00.0 

{ 035.01.3.0 

Plimouth Plymouth Town 04.13. 004.13.0.0 

269.18.8.1 

[11] 

The distribution made of the moneys given from the several 
colonyes now followeth 

To m r Bulkeley & M r Downing 008.18.06 

To m r Samuel Mather during his fellowship 009.08.06.2 

m r Samuel Danforth, Read 1 " & fellow 6 yeares 056.13.08 

m r Jonath. Mitchell, fellow 3 yeers 026.00.00 

m r Comfort Starr fellow p 1 of 2 yeers 011.10.00 2 

m r Samuel Eaton fellow 2 yeer & i 034.07.06 

m r Vrian Oakes 010.16.02 

m r John Collins, fellow H yeer 018.00.00 

S r 3 Wigglesworth. fellow % a yeer 004.00.00 

m r White 006.00.00 

m r Elia Corlett 002.00.00 

S r Ames 022. 08. 00. i 

Jn°Ames 011. 05. 03. i 

m r John Brock 003. 07. 06. £ 

m r Stirk 002.06.08 

S r Hollett Steward 002.16.06 

S r Phillips Steward 006.10.00 

S r Jnce 009.13.04 

Bowers 009.12.00 

Thompson 018.11.06 

James by order from N. Haven 010. 07.10. £ 

To 6 Students for writing for y e Churches 002. 04. 06. £ 

m r Jenners Sons 011. 14.08. 1 

Summa .... 298.05.02. 

Mem a . 
1 Tref D "de The Severall donations made to the Colledge, dureing the time that 
m r Dunster 4 was Presid* of said sa44 Society, was by said m r Dunster 
received and distributed, according to the appoyntm* of y e Overseers. 

1 The figures have been altered. 

2 The figures for pounds and shillings have been altered. 

3 Altered from " m r ." 

4 The words " m r Dunster " are substituted for " he," crossed out. 



J 



COLLEGE CHARTER, 1650 181 

and on ball, of acc ts by him made at the resignation of his place, 
said m r Dunster was C r . to ye Colledge. as appearith. pag. 18 : * 

[12] 

ffor the further Jncouragement & promoting the weall & Govern- 
ment of the Student in the Colledge, The Gen H Court held at Boston 
the 30 th of May. 1650. made & granted under the Seal of the Colony 
this following Charter. 

Whereas through the good hand of God, many well devoted 
persons have been and dayly are moved and stirred up to give and be- 
stow sundry guiftes, Legacyes, Lands and Revenues for the Advance- 
ment of all good Litterature, Arts & Sciences in Harvard Colledge in 
Cambridge, in the County of Middlesex, and to the maintenance of 
the President & ffellowes and for all Accommodations of buildings & 
all other necessary provisions that may conduce to the Education of 
the English & Jndian Youth of this Country in Knowledge & godli- 
ness. Jt is therefore ordered and enacted by this Court and the 
Authority thereof That for the furthering of so good a work and for 
the purposes afores d from henceforth, that The s d Colledge in Cam- 
bridge in Middlesex in New England shall be a Corporation consisting 
of seaven persons (to witt) a President, ffive ffellowes and a Treasurer 
or Burser; And that Henry Dunster shall be the first President; 
Samuel Mather, Samuel Danforth Masters of Art, Jonathan Mitchell, 
Comfort Starre and Samuel Eaton, Bachelo r s of Art shall be the five 
ffellows, and Thomas Danforth to be p r sent Treasurer all of them 
being Inhabitants in the Bay, and shall be the first seven persons of 
which the s d Corporation shall consist. And that 2 the s d seven per- 
sons or the greater number of them procuring the Presence of the 
Overseers of the Colledge, and by their counsell and consent shall 
have powr and are hereby authorized at any time 3 or times to Elect a 
new President ffellows or 4 Treasurer, so oft and from time to time as 
any of the s d p r son or p r sons shall dye or be removed, which s d Pres- 
ident and ffellows for the time being shall for ever hereafter in name & 
fact be one body [ 13 ] politique and corporate in Law to all intents 

1 The reference is to page [18] of the text, or page 186 of this volume. 

2 The word " that " is interlined. 

3 The last letter in this word has been altered. 

4 Substituted for " and," crossed out. 



182 COLLEGE BOOK III 

and purposes, and shall have perpetuall succession, And shall be 
called by the name of President & ffellows of Harvard Colledge. 
And shal ! from time to time be eligible as afores d , And by that name 
they and theyr successor shall and may purchase and acquire to 
themselvs or take & receive upon free guift and donation any lands, 
Tenements, Hereditam^ within this Jurisdiction* of the Massachu- 
setts not exceeding the Vallue of ffive hundred pound per Annum 
and any goodes & Summs of money whatsoev r to the use and behoofe 
of the s d President, ffellowes and Schollars of the s d Colledge and 
also may sue and plead or may be sued & 2 impleaded by the name 
afores d in all Courts & places of Judicature within the Jurisdiction 
afores d , And that the s d President with any three of the ffellows shall 
have powr & are hereby authorized when they think fitt to make & 
appoynt a comon Seale for the use of the s d Corporation. And the 
President & ffellows or the majo r part of them from time to time 
may meet and choose such officers and servants for the Colledge & 
make such Allowance to them and them also to remove and after 
death or removall to choose such oth r s and to make from time to 
time such orders & By Lawes for the better ordering and carrying on 
the work of the Colledge as they shall think fitt Provided the s d Orders 
be allowed by the Overseers. And also that the President & ffellows 
or a Majo r part of them with the Treasurer shall have powr to 
make conclusive bargaines for lands & Tenem ts to be purchased by 
the s d Corporation for vallueable Consideration. And for the better 
ordering of the Governm 1 of the s d Colledge and Corporation, Bee 
it enacted by the Authority afores d That the President and three 
more of the fellows shall & may from time to time upon due warn- 
ing or [ 14 ] notice given by the President to the rest hold a meeting 
for the debating and concluding of affairs conc r ning the proffitt and 
revenues of any lands & disposing of their goods. Provided that all 
the s d disposing be according to the will of the Dono r s. And for 
direction in all emergent occasions, execution of all Orders & By 
laws for th e-^tter-Ordering-^Rd-e ar r yi n g -on-fe lic work of the- and for 
the procuring of a generall meeting of all 3 the Overseers of the Society 
in great & difficult Cases, and in cases of non-Agreement. Jn all 

i The word " shal," perhaps in a different hand, is interlined. 

2 Written over " or." 

3 The word "all" is interlined. 



FORM OF EXEMPTION FOR COLLEGE SERVANTS 183 

which Cases afores d , the Conclusion shall be made by the majo r 
parte, the said * President having a casting voice The Overseers con- 
senting thereunto. And that all the afores d Transactions shall tend 
to & for the use & behoofe of the President, ffellows, Schollars & 
Officers of the s d Colledge and for all accommodations of buildings, 
books and all other necessary provisions and furnitures, as may be 
for the Advancem* and Education of Youth in aU manner of good 
Litterature Arts & Sciences. And further be it ordered - by thk - 
Court. And further be it ordered by this Court and the Authority 
thereof That all the lands Tenements or Hereditaments, houses or 
Revenues within this Jurisdiction to the afores d President or Col- 
ledge appertayning, not exceeding the Vallue of ffive hundred pound 
per annum shall from henceforth be freed from all civill Jmpositions, 
Taxes and Rates, all goods to the s d corporation or to any Schollar 
thereof appertayning shall be exempted from all manner of Toll, 
customes & Excise whoever. And that the s d President, ffellows & 
Schollars together with the Servants & other necessary officers to the 
s d President or Colledge appertayning, not exceeding ten viz*. Three 
to the President and seven 2 to the Colledge belonging shall be exempted 
from all p r sonall, civill Offices, military Exercises or Services watch- 
ing and warding and such of their Estates not exceeding one hundred 
pound a man shall be freed from all country Taxes or Rates whatso- 
ever and none others. Jn Witness whereof the Court hath caused the 
Seale of the Colony to be hereunto affixed. Dated the One & thirtieth 
Day of the Third month called May. Anno One thousand six hundred 
& fifty. 

Thomas Dudley Governo r . 

Compared wth the Original Charter 

p H Flynt 3 

[15] 

The fforme of Exemption for Colledge Servants 

Whereas o r much hon d magistrates & Deputies 4 in Gen a Court 
assembled in the Third month of the yeare, One thousand Six hun- 

1 The word " said " is interlined. 

2 Substituted for " Ten," crossed out. 

3 This entry by Flynt is in his own hand. 

4 Altered from " Deputities." 



184 COLLEGE BOOK III 

dred & fifty have for the furtherance of good Litterature, by Charter 
priviledged the officers & serv* 3 of Harvard Colledge to the number of 
ten from all p r sonall offices civill & military Exercises and Services 
watchings and wardings & their Estates not exceeding an hundred 
pound a man from all country Rates & Taxes whatever. 

Wee therfore. A. B. C. having chosen o r well 1 approved neighbo r 
D. C. to serve us for the space of one whole year from the date hereof 
in his calling of B to attend the colledge work upon a week or ten 
days warning so often as thereunto he shall be called do by vertue 
of the priviledges given unto us exempt the afores d D C from all the 
aforementioned Jncumbrances & Charges Jn witness whereof he 
hath given & we have accepted these p r sents signed with o r hands. 

A 
DC B 

C 
[16] 

M r John Newgate of Boston by Deed under his hand & seale 
bearing date: 1650. gave an Annuity to the Colledge 

of five pound per annum for ev r . ffor the payment whereof his ffarme 
at Rumbly Marsh stands bound. 

M r John Coggan of Boston Merch* gave to the Colledge Seventy 
Ac r s of marsh land, scittuate lying & being at 2 Rumney 3 Marsh & 
confirmed the same by deed under his hand & seale. dat. 1652. 

Cambridge gave to the Colledge, at Shawshin a ffarme of One 
hundred ac r s : unto which m r Henry Dunster President added One 
hundred more, & is scituate lying & being the whole Two hundred 
ac r s in one entire p r cell, on the north - Easterly side of Shawshin 
River adjoyning unto m r Daniels farme 

The names of sundry Gentellmen that contributed towards the 
repair of the Colledge in the year 4 1654. & 1655 &c. 

The Revd M r 8 Allin 8 of Dedham. 2 Cows, vallued at 009 00 00 

Richard Dana in Cotton Cloath 000 09 00 



1 The word " well " is interlined. 

2 Written over " in." 

8 Altered from " Rumbley." 
< Two or three letters are here crossed out. 
b The word " John " is here interlined in pencil. 
Apparently altered from " Allen." 



EARLY DONORS TO THE COLLEGE 185 

m r John Stedman of Cambridge 001 00 00 

m r Edmund Angier . . 001 00 00 

m r Edw d . Jackson 002 12 06 

m r Nickolas Davison 001 10 00 

m r Edmund ffrost, Ruling Elder of the Church of Cambr 000 10 00 

A widdow in Roxbury 001 00 00 

Daniel Kempster 000 05 00 

Sam 1 Richardson of Woburne 002 10 00 

m r Richard Russell of Charlstown 005 00 00 

m r Peter Oliver 005 00 00 

Richard Bellingham Esq r .................. 040 00 00 

m r John Newgate 010 00 00 + 

79-16-6 2 



[17 



m r Jncrease Nowell 002 10 00 

Cap* Rob* Cane 003 00 00 

m r Theodore Atkinson 005 00 00 

-si* Richard Saltonstall, Esq r — 104 a 104 00 00 3 

Elder 4 Colburne of Boston 006 10 00 

m r Hezekia Usher of Boston merch* . . . . 008 00 00 

m r Sam 1 Cole 000 16 00 

m r James Oliver 010 00 00 6 

m r Sam 1 Danforth 001 04 00 

ffrom Charlstowne 009 09 00 

m r John Wilson Sen 1 " ffourty shill per annum for 10 yeer .... 020 00 00 
Vide ace* hereof — page. 37. potius 47 6 

170. 9. 
79.16. 6 

See donation Bk. p. 8 7 250. 5. 6 8 



1 In the original the account has not been added up ; but underneath this entry 
are written in pencil the figures "79 16 6." 

2 These figures, presumably in the hand of President Quincy, are written in 
pencil, and then again (immediately below) in ink. 

3 There are several holes in the leaf containing pages [17-18]. In this entry, 
the in 104 is cut out. 

4 In the vacant space is written in pencil in a later hand, perhaps that of 
J. L. Sibley, " William." 

5 In this entry, the 1 in 10 is cut out; hence 10 is conjectural. But if £170 9s 
given below, is correct — and presumably it is — for the total of the sums en- 
tered on page [17], then 10 is the correct figure in this entry. 

6 The words " potius 47 " are in a different hand. The reference is to page 
[47] of the text, or pages 213-214 of this volume. 

7 This entry is in the hand of President Quincy. 

s In the original the account has not been added up. These figures are pre- 
sumably in the hand of President Quincy. 



186 COLLEGE BOOK HI 

June. 10. 1654. 
m r Henry Dunster President made a Resignation of his place in 
writing under his hand & delivered the same to the Overseers of the 
Colledge, wch being p r sented unto the Gen a Court then sitting, The 
Court made thereupon their Order as followeth. 

In Answer to a writing presented to this Court by m r Henry Dun- 
ster, wherin amongst other things therin conteyned, he is pleased to 
make a resignation of his place as President, This Court doth order 
that it shall be left to the care & discretion of the Overseers of the 
Colledge to make provision (in case he persist in his Resolution more 
then one month & informe the Overseers) for some meet p r son to 
carry an end that work for the p r sent & also to act in whatever 
necessity should call for untill the next Sessions of this Court, when 
wee shall be better enabled to settle what will be needfull in all re- 
pects [ 18 ] with reference to the Colledge : and that the Overseers 
will be pleased to make returne to this Court at that time of w fc they 
shall do herein. 

At a meeting of the Overseers. 24. 8. 1654 
M r Henry Dunster after sundry conferences that had passed be- 
tween the Overseers & himself made his finall Resignation in these 
following words. 

To the hon d Magistrates & Rev 01 Elders of Harvard Colledge. 

J Henry Dunster Prsesident of Harvard Colledge: ffor & upon 
diverse considerations & weighty Reasons me thereunto moving, do 
relinquish & resigne up my Presidentship into the hands of yo r selvs 
the hon d Overseers of the s d Colledge. Heartily praying God gra- 
ciously to provide for the s d Society a suitable supply for the publick 
weal thereof, & of the whole country 

Henry Dunster 

This Resignation of M r Dunsters was voted & consented to by the 
Overseers the 24 th of the 8 th 1654. 

M r Dunsters Accomp 1 p r sented to the Colledge January. 15. 1654. 
wherin he makes -the- Himselfe 1 Debto r . 110 B 19 8b 2<* J. And gives 
Himselfe 2 Creditt. — 119.04. 0. 0. 

1 Written over "Colledge." 

1 Substituted for "them," crossed out. 






COLLEGE LAWS, 1642-1646 187 

By Order of the Overseers 

Paid to M is Elizabeth Dunster the Relict Widdow of the above- 
named Henry Dunster decead in full of her 1 Ballance of Accompts 
as 2 above & for all other demands by Thomas Danforth Treasurer 
Twenty pounds. 

Twenty 3 see Danforths ace P. 46 4 

[19] 

The Lawes, Libertyes and Orders of Harvard Colledge confirmed con. Laws 
by the Overseers & President of the Colledge in the Yeares 
1642, 1643, 1644, 1645 & 1646. and published to the 

Schollars for the perpetuall p r servation of Eadem. Lib. t 

their Wellfare & Government. p " 

1 : ffirst. When any Schollar is able to read Tully or such like 
classicall Latine Author ex tempore & make & speak true lattin in 
verse & prose, suo (ut aiunt) Marte, & decline perfectly the Para- 
digmes of Nouns & Verbs in the Greek Tongue, then may he be ad- 
mitted into the Colledge, nor shall any claim Admission before 
such Qualifications. 

2. Every One shall consider the maine End of his life & Studyes to 
know God & Jesus Christ which is eternall Life. John. 17. 3. 

3. Seeing the Lord giveth Wisdome every one shall seriously by 
Prayer in secrett, seek wisdom of him. Prov. 2. 2. 3. 

4. Every one shall so exercise himselfe in reading the Scriptures 
twice a day that they may be ready to give an Account of their pro- 
ficiency therin both in Theoreticall Observations of Language & 
Logicke & in practicall & spirituall Truths, as their Tuto r shall 
require according to their severall Abilityes respectively, seing the 
entrance of the word giveth light. Ps. 119. 130 



1 Apparently altered from " the " or " ther." 

2 Written over " &." 

3 This word is underscored. 

* This entry, which is in the hand of President Quincy, was originally made 
in pencil and then traced over in ink. Underneath the figure "46 " is written 
in pencil " J Q." The reference is to page [46] of the text, or page 212 of this 
volume. 

6 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Wadsworth. The refer- 
ence is to pages [43-44] of College Book I, or pages 24-29 of this volume. 



188 COLLEGE BOOK III 

5. In the publick Assembly they shall carefully shun all Gestures 1 
that shew any Contempt or neglect of Gods ordinances & be ready to 
give an Account to their Tuto r s of their profitting & to use the helps of 
storing themselves with knowledge as their Tuto r s shall direct them, 
& all Sophisters & Batchelo r s untill themselvs make commonplace 
shall publiqply repeat Sermons in the Hall whenev r they are called 
forth. 

6. They Shall Eschew all profanation of Gods holy Name, Attri- 
butes, word, Ordinances & times of worship & study with Reverence 
& Love carefully to retaine God & his Truth in their minds. 

[20] 

7. They shall hono r as theyr Parents, magistrates Elders, Tuto r s, 
& aged p r sons, by being silent in their p r sence (except they be 
called to answer) not gainsaying, shewing all those laudable expres- 
sions of hono r & Reverence in their p r sence that are in use as bowing 
before them, standing uncovered or the like. 

8. They shall be slow to speake & eschew not only Oathes, Lyes & 
uncertayn Rumo r s, but likewise all Jdle ffoolish, bitter Scoffing, 
frothy wanton words and offensive Gestures. 

9. None shall pragmatically intrude or Jntermeddle in other mens 
Affaires. 

10. During their Residence they shall studiously redeem their 
time, observe the generall houres appoynted for all the Schollars, 
& the speciall hour for their own lectures. & without any disturbance 
by word or gesture : And if of anything they doubt, they shall enquire 
as of their fellowes, so in case of Non-Resolution, of their Tuto r s. 

II. 3 None shall under any pretence whatsoev 1 " frequent the Com- 
pany & Society of such men as lead an ungirt & dissolute life. Neither 
shall any without License of the Overseers of the Colledge be of the 
Artillery or traineband. Nor shall any without y e Lecense 4 of the 
Overseers of the Colledge, his Tuto r s leave, or in his absence, the call 
of Parent or Guardians go out to another Towne. 



1 The third letter in this word has been altered. 

3 Written in the upper left margin of page [20]. 

3 Apparently altered from ". 12." 

4 Perhaps "License." 



COLLEGE LAWS, 1642-1646 189 

12. No Schollar shall buy sell or exchange any thing to the vallue 
of Six pence without the allowance of his parents, guardians or 
Tuto r s. And whosoev 1 " is found to have sold or bought any such thing 
without acquainting their Tuto r or parents shall forfeit the vallue of 
the commodity or the restoring of it, according to the discretion of 
the President. 

13. The Schollars shall never use the mother Tongue except that in 
publick Exercises of Oratory, or such like they be called to make 
them in English. 

14. If any Schollar being in health shall be absent from prayer or 
Lectures, except in case of urgent necessity or by leave of his Tuto r , 
he shall be liable to admonition, (or such punishm* [21] as the 
President shall think meet) if he offend above once a week. 

15. Every Schollar shall be called by his sirname only, till he be 
invested with his first degree, except he be ffellow Commoner or a 
Knights Eldest Son, or of superio r nobility. 

16 No Schollar shall under any pretence of recreation or other 
cause (unless foreshewed & allowed by the President or his Tuto r ) 
be absent from his Studies or appoynted exercises above an hour at 
morning-Bever, halfe an hour at after noon-bever, an hour & an 
halfe at dinner, and so long at supper. 

17. Jf any Schollar shall transgress any of the Laws of God, or the 
house out of perverseness or appairent negligence after twice admoni- 
tion, he shall be liable if not adultus, to correction : if adultus, his name 
shall be given up to the Overseers of the Colledge that he may be 
publickely dealt with after the desert of his fault; but in grosser 
offences such graduall proceeding shall not be expected 

18. Every Schollar that upon proof is found able to read the Orig- 
inall of the old & new Testament in the Lattin Tongue, & to resolve 
them logically, withall being of honest life & conversation & at any 
publick act hath the Approbation of the Overseers & masters of the 
Colledge may be invested with his first degree. Vide prseced. pag. 8. 2 

19. Every Schollar that giveth up in writing a Synopsis or Summa 
of Logick, Naturall & morall Philosophy, Arithmetick Geometry & 
Astronomy & is ready to defend his Theses or positions with all skilled 
in the Originalls as afores d & still continues honest & studious, at any 

1 Written in the upper right margin of page [21]. 

2 The reference is to page [8] of the text, or page 177 of this volume. 



190 COLLEGE BOOK III 

publick act after tryall he shall be capable of the second Degree of 
master of Arts. Vid. pag. 8. 1 

At a meeting of the Overseers of Harvard Colledge, in s d 
Colledge. May 6th. 1650 

l. 2 No Schollar whatever without the fore 3 acquaintance & leave of 
-tfae-feHews- shall be p r sent of the President and his Tuto r , or in the ab- 
sence of eith r of them two of the senior fellows shall be p r sent at or 
in any of the publick civill meetings or concourse of People as Courts 
of Justice, Elections, fTayres, nor at military Exercise in the time or 
coil. Laws.* hours of the Colledge exercise [ 22 ] publick or private, neither 
shall any Schollar exercise himself e in any military band, unless of 
known Gravity & of approved, sober & virtuous conversation & that 
with the leave of the President & his Tuto r . 

2. No Schollar shall take Tobacco, unless p r mitted by the Presi- 
dent with the Consent of their Parents or Guardians; & on good 
Reason first given by a Physician & then in a sober & private manner. 

3. To the Jntent that no Schollar may mispend his Time to the 
dishono r of God & the Society or the griefe & disappointment of 5 his 
freinds, but that the yearly progress & sufficiency of Schollars may be 
manifest: Jt is therfore ordered. That henceforth there shall be 
three weeks of Visitation yeerly foresignified publicply by the Presi- 
dent of the Colledge between the 10 th of June & the commencem*. 
wherin from 9 a clock to 11 in the forenoon & from one to 3 in the 
afternoon of the second & third day of the week all Schollars of two 
yeers standing & upwards shall si tt in the Hall to be examined by all 
comers in the Lattin, Greek & Hebrew Tongues & in Rhetorick, 
Logicke & Physick & they that expect to proceed Batchelo r s that 
yeer to be examined of their sufficiency according to the Laws of the 
Colledge. & such as expect to proceed Masters of Art to exhibbit their 
synopsis of Arts required by the Laws of the Colledge : And in case any 
of the Sophisters Questionists or Jncepto r s faill in the p r mises required 



1 The reference is to page [8] of the text, or page 177 of this volume. 

2 Before " 1," apparently " 20 " has been crossed out. 
8 The word " fore " is interlined. 

« Written in the upper left margin of page [22]. 
5 Written over " &." 



^ L^SA rfssU •*/<: 4. fey ^^A 



6a ay 2 /y/c A. . 



Jt 













^ 



.7. 






-/■ J? 



V. 






*-* x^^+tc 



■/AUt */<c. /4rryL t /. 



rr/n 1 1 -t 



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1 — r r — 1 



tp 









PLAN A 













n/XMctied&l' 



PAYMENTS DUE TO THE COLLEGE, 1654 191 

at their hands according to their standings respectively or be found 
insufficient for their time & standing in the Judgment of any three of 
the visito r s being Overseers of the* Colledge, they shall be deferred to 
the following yeer, but they y* are approved sufficient for their de- 
grees shall proceed; & the Sophist r s publickly approved shall have 
their names sett up in the Hall. 

4 Whereas by experience wee have found it p r judiciall to the pro- 
moting of Learning & good manners in the Colledge to admitt such 
young Schollars who have been negligent in their Studyes & disobe- 
dient to their masters in the Schoolls & so by an evill custome or 
Habbitt become utterly unfltt to improve for their own proffitt accord- 
ing to their freinds Expectation the liberty of Students in the Colledge. 
Jt is therfore ordered, That no Schollar whatsoev r where these be 
published shall thenceforth be admitted [ 23 ] from any such Schooll, Coii. Laws, 
unless having the Testimony of the master of the s d School of his 
Obedience & submission to all Godly School Discipline & of his 
studiousness & Dilligence at least wise for one Quarter of a yeer last 
before his coming thence ; in case of Discontinuance from school then 
it is expected, he shall bring the Testimony of his Sober & Studious 
Conversation und r the hand of a Magistrate or Elder or two or three 
competent or pious witnesses. 

Whereas the Colledge hath received much dammage by unsea- Annoi654 
sonable & bad payments from severall p r sons ffor the future prevention 
hereof it is ordered by the Overseers of the Colledge that henceforth 
all Students appertayning to the Colledge shall pay in all mann r of 
dues, for their commons, Tuition & Study Rents to the Colledge 
Steward & to no other of the Colledge Officers, to be delivered at Cam- 
bridge Town, unless the Steward shall accept of it elsewhere; And 
also that all their payments shall be made either in currant mony or 
wheat, malt, butter, & fatt beasts alive being all good & merchantable 
& fitt for the use of the Colledge, & whatsoever is oth r wise the Steward 
may refuse it, & in case the Steward 2 and Colledge Debto r s cannot 
agree of the vallue of any pay, the price & just estimate thereof 
shall be determined by able men by them mutually chosen. 



1 Written in the upper right margin of page [23], 

2 The third and fourth letters in this word have been altered. 



192 COLLEGE BOOK III 

At a meeting of the Overseers. Anno. 1660 
Jt was ordered 

1 : That no student shall live or board in the family or private 
house of any Jnhabitant in Cambridge, without leave from the Presi- 
dent and his Tuto r , & if any upon such leave obteyned shall so live, 
yet they shall attend all Colledge Exercises, religious & Scholasticall 
& be under Colledge Order & Discipline as others ought to do & be 
that are resident in the Colledge, & shall pay allso five shillings a 
Quarter towards Colledge detriment, beside their Tuto r age. And in 
case any Student shall be & live in the Town as aforesd out of Colledge 
Commons more then one month, whether together or at severall 
times with [ 24 ] without leave obteyned he shall thenceforth be 
looked at as no member of the Colledge. 

2. Also whereas the penaltyes imposed on such Students as are in 
commons are not so suitable in some p r ticulars to awe & deter such 
as board in the Towne as aboves d . Jt is therfore hereby provided, 
that the President or President & Tuto r s may proceed with them within 
the Town in case of Delinquency by Admonition & private correc- 
tion, untill by Reason of an incorrigible Spirit in the offender, The 
President & ffellows shall see cause to proceed to publicke correction 
or Expulsion any former or other Law & Custome notwithstanding 

3 Also whereas divers students are discontinuers for the Jndemnity 
of the Colledge. Jts hereby provided that in case any shall be behind 
of payment of Detriments & halfo Tuition according to former Laws 
more then one month after their Quarter Bill is given in by the 
Steward 2 to the Butlar, such non-payment shall be looked at as 
their utter withdrawing from the Colledge, & they shall loose all 
their Time & Jntrest as to their claiming oi any degree or future 
priviledge in the Colledge oth r wise y n by satisfaction of such Arrear- 
ages due & dammages sustained & the Approbation of the Corpora- 
tion concurring & not with standing such withdrawing such students 
shall be lyable to pay all such their Arrearages & just debts due to 
the Colledge 

4. Whereas (through long experience) former Laws have not 



1 Written in the upper left margin of page [24]. 

2 The third letter in this word has been altered. 

8 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 



COLLEGE ORDERS, 1660 193 

been effectuall for the p r venting of unnecessary dammages to the 
Colledge, by the violence or carelesness of those for whose Accom- 
modation great cost & charges have from time to time been expended. 
The Overseers do therfore order, that henceforth all due care be taken 
for the p r venting thereof; And that where any dammage shall be 
found done to any Study or Chamber inhabited, The p r son or p r sons 
resident therin shall make good the same, & where any dammage is 
done to y e Edifice of the Colledge (excepting by the inevitable provi- 
dence of God) to any vacant Chamber, or Study, the Colledge fences 
about the yard, 1 pump, Bell or clock &c : the same shall be made good 
again by all the Students resident in the Colledge at the Time when 
such dammages shall be done or discovered to be done & shall be duly 
payd in their Quarter Bills to the Steward of the Colledge, who shall 
repay the same to the Treasurer or oth r such officers of the Colledge 
as shall be appoynted to disburse the same. 

[25] 

Provided always, if the p r son or p r sons that were the Acto r or Acto r s, con. Law*s 
or blameable occasion of such dammages done be discovered & do 
appeare he or they shall make full satisfaction for the same: And 
shall be also lyable to such further punishments by fine or oth r wise 
according to the Demerritt of his ffact. And where any Student do 
take any Study he shall pay the Rent thereof for one whole year, 
wheth r he be Resident therin so long or not, & shall stand engaged to 
deliver the same in such good Repair as he received it at his entrance. 

5 Whereas uncomfortable experience hath shewed that notwith- 
standing former Laws & provisions for Colledge Exercises (viz Com- 
mon places, Disputes and Declamations) have been too much neglected 
or slightly p r formed even by senio 1 " Schollars who should be exemplary 
to oth r s. Jt is therfore ordered, y l the President shall have full powr 
to impose a fine in way of penalty upon any negligent p r son according 
to his discretion, provided it exceed not five shillings for one Offence. 
And that if the Resident number of such as are to Common place be 
small, Comon places be but once a month, that so their may be com- 
petent time to do their work throughly without too much burden or 
hindrance to oth r Studyes. 

1 The last letter in this word has been altered. 
8 Written in the upper right margin of page [25]. 



194 COLLEGE BOOK III 



Anno. 1666 



l, 4. 



Jt is ordered by the Overseers, that such as are fellows of the Col- 
ledge, & have sallaryes payd them out of the Treasury, shall have 
their constant Residence in the Colledge, and shall Lodge therin & be 
p r sent with the Schollars at meall times in the Hall, have their Studyes 
in the Colledge that so they may be better enabled to inspect the 
mann r s of the Schollars & p r vent all unnecessary dammage to the 
Society. 

These ffollowing orders were made by the Overseers. Anno. 1667. 

for the rectifying of y e Library & Rules for the 

Library Keeper. 

1 : No p r son not resident in the Colledge, except an Overseer shall 
borrow a book out of the Library. 

2 No Schollar in the Colledge, under a Senio r Sophister shall 
borrow a book out of the Library. 

3. No one under master of Art (unless it be a fellow) shall borrow a 
Book without the allowance of the President 

[26] 

4 Jf any p r son whatsoever shall be found injurious to the Library 
by abusing or not carefully restoring any Book borrowed by him, 
upon complaint to the President by y e Library Keep r he shall pay 
double dammage & be debarred from borrowing. 

5. No p r son besides the Library keeper shall be allowed to have a 
Key to the Library, except the President, the Pasto r of the Church in 
Cambridge, & the Senio r ffellow for himselfe & the rest of the ffellows 
& no other of the Schollars shall have liberty to study in the Library. 

6. There shall be no lending or removing out of the Library the 
new Globes or books of extraordinary vallue (as Biblia Polyglotta, 
King of Spains Bible &c) but with very great caution & upon extra- 
ordinary occasion. 

7. The Library keep 1 * shall take care that by the helpe of y* Treas- 
urer of the Colledge, the Library be kept in good repair, that no dam- 

i Written in the upper left margin of page [26]. 

2 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Wadsworth. The reference 
is to page [27] of College Book IV. 



LIBRARY RULES, 1867 195 

mage come to any of the books by the weath r or want of convenient 
shelving &c. Also he shall keep the Library duly swept, & the books 
clean & orderly in their places. 

8. The Library keep 1 " shall write or cause to be fairly written in a 
book (to be payd for by the Treasurer) the names of all the Books 
belonging to the Library, ffirst in the order as they are placed & dis- 
posed according to the affixed catalogue. Secondly, Jn one continued 
Alphabet setting down the Authors name & what of his works are in 
the Library & where. Thirdly The names of the severall Dono r s of 
y e Books with the Books given by them 

9. No Book shall be sold unless in the Library there be two or more 
of the same sort, & not that but by y e order of the Corporation & the 
same exactly recorded. 

10. Jf any new book or Books be given, they shall be brought into 
the Library with the knowledge of President & fellows & an exact 
Accompt thereof taken & kept from time to time by the Library 
keep r . 

II. 1 The Library Records & other manuscripts & w* else shall be Au g st24. i6i 
judged expedient shall be kept in a chest in y e Library und r Lock & 
Key to be kept by the Library keep r . 

12 No book shall be taken out of the Library or returned without 
the knowledge & p r sence of the Library keep r , the name of the Bor- 
rower & restorer with the book & time of borrowing & returning being- 
orderly sett down in the Library keep r s book by the p r son himselfe. 

13. The ordinary time for borrowing & returning books shall be 
between y e Hours 3 of eleven in the forenoon & one in the afternoone. 

14 No book shall be lent ordinarily for above a months time & 
once in halfe a year all the Books shall be actually called in & sett in 
their places. 

[27] 

15. Once in two years the Library keep r shall be newly chosen & coil. Lawes 
then give up his Accompt to the President & ffellows. 

16. Vpon the new choice or removall of the Library Keep 1 ", the 

1 Altered from " 12." 

2 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 

3 Written over a word undecipherable. 

4 Written in the upper right margin of page [27]. 



196 COLLEGE BOOK III 

fellows shall look over the Library & see that all the books be actually 
in their places ; if any be wanting the Library keep 1 " shall make them 
good 

At an Overseers meeting. Anno. 1667 

1 Jt is ordered that no Student be admitted into the Colledge by the 
President or his Tuto r untill he bring a certificate under the hand of 
the Steward that one quart r s allowance for his dues to the Colledge be 
fully satisfyed nor shall any be continued therin unless from time to 
time at ev r y Quart's day they bring the like certificate from the 
Steward that he is satisfyed for the following Quarter with the Arrear- 
ages of any before the Quarter past. And in case eith r President, 1 
Tuto r or any oth r Officer shall p r sume so to do they shall satisfye the 
dammages thereby sustained to the Colledge or Steward & the Stew- 
ard may abate such person wheth r President or Tuto r of any dues to 
them appertayning so far as shall be in his hand to allow them & they 
shall also be lyable oth r wise fully to satisfye all the s d dammages. 

2. 2 Jt is ordered likewise that the Steward shall not be injoyned 
to accept of above one Quarter part, flesh meat of any p r son. 

3 Whereas it is observed that there is a great Discouragement putt 
upon Parents by Reason of severall Abuses that are putt upon their 
children at y r first entrance by the Sen r Students, sending them upon 
y r private Errands. &c : The Overseers do commend it to y e Presi- 
dent & fellows y* for the future due care be taken to p r vent the same & 
y 1 all Abuses in that kind be severely punished by imposing a penalty 
on such p r son or p r sons, as shall presume so to doe, or by corporall 
punishm*. as the Corporation shall see meet. 

At a meeting of ye Overseers, 1681 
1. The Overseers do order, that the President of the Colledge do 
from time to time comend it to the Parents & Guardians of those 
students that commence, that they provide not above one gallon of 
wine for a Student, judging it to be sufficient for that occasion. 

[28] 

2 Also instead & place of a visito r or Procto 1 ", the Overseers do 
impowr the senior ffellow in the Colledge there resident from time to 

1 The first letter in this word has been altered. 

2 This figure has been altered. 

* Written in the upper left margin of page [28]. 



PROTEST AGAINST WEARING LONG HAIR, 1649 197 

time to execute the s d Trust & Office to whom is hereby given & dele- 
gated full powr to reforme all disorders among the Schollars & to 
visitt any Chamber or Room & to turn out from thence any p r son or 
company that he shall app r hend & judge uncivill, vnsuitable & un- 
sober & likewise to take away all wine & strong drink where he feares 
any excess & is also further impowred to execute the trust & Office 
according to Instructions given him from time to time by the Cor- 
poration. 

At a Corporation meeting held June. 17. 1667 

Jt was then ordered & appoynted, That the fforenoon on the Com- 
mencement day be allowed to 1 the Batchelo r s for the p r formance of 
their Exercises on that day : And that for the future it be looked upon 
as their due ordinarily, i. e. Except it do appear to the President & 
fellows that there be just Reason for their ordering it otherwise. 

Formula Publicse Confessionis 

Ego S. W. Qui a cultu divino in Aula Collegii tarn matutino quam 
vespertino toties per aliquot menses abfui (in qua absentia monitis & 
aliis in me Animadversionum Gradibus non obstantibus hactenus 
perstiti) nunc culpam meam Agnosco et publicse Agnitionis hoc 
Testimonio me reum profiteor, et majorem in his Exercitiis pietatis 
diligentiam in posterum (Deo volente & juvante) dum hie egero, 
polliceor. 

[29] 

ffor as much as the wearing of Long hair after the maner of Ruffians con. Laws '• 
and barbarous Jndians hath begun to invade New England contrary 
to the Rule of Gods word which sayth Jt is a shame for a man to wear 
long hair, as also the commendable custom generally of all the godly 
of our nation, untill within these few yeares. 

Wee the magistrates who have subscribed this Paper (for the clear- 
ing of our own Jnnocency in this behalfe) do declare & manifest our 
dislike & detestation against the wearing of such long hair, as against 
a thing uncivill & unmanly whereby men do deforme themselvs & 

1 Written over "&." 

2 Written in the upper right margin of page [29]. 



198 COLLEGE BOOK III 

offend sober & modest men & do corrupt good manners. Wee do 
therfore earnestly intreat all the Elders of this Jurisdiction (as often 
as they shall see cause) to manifest their Zeale against it in their pub- 
lick Administrations, and to take care that the members of their re- 
spective Churches be not defiled ther with, that so such as shall prove 
obstinate & will not reform themselvs may have God & man to 
bear witness against them. The 3 d month. 10 day. 1649. 

Jo : Endicott Gov r 

Tho: Dudley Dep t Gov r 

Rich : Bellingham 

Richard Saltonstall 

Jncrease Nowell 

William Hibbins 

Thomas fflint 

Rob : Briges 

Simon Bradstreet. 
[30] 

Jn the yeare 1659. 

Richard Saltonstall Esq r being then in England sent over for the 
use of the Colledge in mony, Two hundred & twenty pounds. & in 
goods ! as they cost in England One hundred pound. 

M r William Paine Merch 1 gave to the Colledge Twenty pounds, to 
be layd out for the purchase of lands: & with s d mony the lands 
whereon the Colledge 2 now stands & the Presidents 3 lodgings was 
bought, conteyning about One acre & a Rood. See Coll. B. 2. p. 38. 4 

M r Robert Keyne of Boston merely deceased, 5 by his last will gave 
to the Colledge a Legacy of one hundred pound. Also the one moiety 
or halfe part of a house Scittuate in Boston neer to the old meeting 
house vallued at One hundred and forty 6 seave 7 pound ten shillings [& 



1 A word is here crossed out. 

2 In the margin is written in pencil, perhaps by Thaddeus William Harris, 
" The 2 d Harvard, which was burnt." 

' In the margin is written in pencil, perhaps by T. W. Harris, " The ! Lodg- 
ings ' or house finished by Dunster & which stood near Massachusetts." 

4 The words " See Coll. B. 2. p. 38 " are in the hand of President Wadsworth. 
The reference is to College Book II. 

6 The first letter in this word has been altered. 

6 Apparently altered from " fifty." 

* Written over " Two." 



LEGACIES AND GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE 199 

is now in the possession of Seth 1 Perry by lease from the Colledge 
Treasurer at Ten pound per annum]. 2 

M r Henry Webb of Boston, Merch* decead by his last will, gave to 
the Colledge One dwelling house Scittuate in Boston, rented at Thir- 
teen pounds per Annum, wherin Leiv* Enoch Greinliffe doth now 
dwell. Also he gave a legacy of fifty pounds, 4 to be laid out in Some 
pasture Land, or Small house that may yeild yearly Rent, either for the 
mainten c of Some poor Scholars or otherwise for the best good of the 
College [to be imgved by the Care and discretion of the Presid* & 
overseers of y e College & the Apgbation of the Overseers of this my 
Will] s 

The Gen H Court held at Boston 1657 gave to the Colledge Two 
thousand ac r s of land which was accordingly layd out in the Pequid 
Country neer unto Southerton, as is more p r ticularly declared in the 
Returne made by the Surveyo r to the Gen H Court. 

[31] 

Capt* Richard Sprague of Charlstowne by his last will & Testa- 
ment gave to the Colledge Thirty Ewe 6 Sheep with their Lambs 
vallued at Thirty pound. 

M r E j^n r ? Hopkins, sometimes Gov r no r of Hartford Colony by 
his last will gave to the Colledge One hundred pound. 

Bridget Wynes of Charlstowne gave a Legacy to the Colledge to 
the vallue of ffour pounds in mony. 

Thomas Pierce sen r of Charlstowne deceased, by his last will 
gave a Legacy to the Colledge of Twenty Shillings. 

M r Wilson of Boston Merch* gave to the Colledge a Pewter 
fflaggon vallued at ten shillings. 



1 Originally there was a blank space before " Perry," ii Seth " having been 
written in by President Leverett. 

2 The square brackets are in the original. 

3 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 

4 The words after the word " pounds " to the end of the sentence are in the 
hand of President Leverett. 

5 The square brackets are in the original. 
• Altered from " Ewes." 

» " John " is underscored, but not crossed out, and above it is written, in 
the hand of President Leverett, " Edward." 



200 COLLEGE BOOK III 

M r Rowss of Charlstowne Sadler gave a Legacy to the Colledge to 
the vallue of two pound ten-shillings. 

S r l Kenelme Digby gave to s d Colledges Library, as many books 
as were vallued at Sixty pound. 

S r Thomas Temple Knight, gave two Globes a Cselestiall & Terres- 
triall to s d Colledge. 

M r Edward Ting 2 gave nine pound & ten shillings to the Colledge. 

M 1 * Thomas Graves 3 gave some Mathematicall Books tow ds the 
furnishing of the Library. 

M r John Willet gave to the Colledge the Bell now hanging in the 
Turrett. 

M r Ralfe ffreck gave to the s d Library Biblia Polyglotta. 

M r John ffrecks gave some Books to the vallue of ten pounds. 

[32] 

M r John Winthrop gave towards y e furnishing s d Library many 
choice books to the vallue of twenty pounds. 

S r Richard Daniel Knight gave many books to the Library 

M r Latham Minister of Bury in the County of Lancaster gave to the 
Colledge ffive pounds. 

M r Stranguish of London gave the Colledge ten pound. 

M r Jn°. Ward sometime of Jpswich. by his last will gave the re- 
mainder of his estate debts & legacyes bequeathed by him being 
payd, to the Colledge whereof receiued, from m r Payne his executor in 
horses vallued at Seaventy two pounds. 

M r John Payne of Boston, march* gave to the Colledge ten pounds. 

M r W m Colbran, of Boston, gave to the Colledge money five 
pounds. 

The Jnhabitans of 4 out of their poverty gave to Harvard 

Colledge One hundred & twenty four pound. 

M r Stranguish gave to the Colledge ten pound. 

M r John Buckley first master of Arts in Harvard Colledge & Mat- 
thew Day Steward of the Colledge gave a Garden conteyning about 



1 Altered from " M r ." 

2 Over this name is written in pencil " Ting." 

3 Over this name is written in pencil " Graves." 

4 In the blank space is written in pencil " [Segotea, J L S.]." 







£ •••-. / 



£c^ 3<£^J**f £r*^g. 



tyy*M fe&*^<pS ^S^M 



) 



Ol V 



^11 



S3 



: 



DUTIES OF THE COLLEGE SERVANTS, 1667 201 

one Acre & one Rood of land scittuate & * neer adjoyning to the Col- 
ledge & ordered the same to be for the use of the ffellows that should 
from time to time belong to & be resident at the said Society, the s d 
Garden being now commonly called & known by y e name of the ffel- 
lows Orchard. 

[Vid. m r Bulkleys grant under his hand pag. 37.] 2 

[33] 

At a meeting of the Overseers at the Presid ts house. Con. Lawes 

March. 27. 1667. 

The Orders following were confirmed untill the Overseers Eadem. Lib. 

shall see cause to take them into further consideration. 

1. Henceforth the Steward, 5 the Butlar & the Cook shall in distinct 
Books, keep an exact Account of their respective Offices & Trusts 
committed to them in way of Debto r & Credito r and shall p r sent the 
same to the Corporation at the Presidents house, from time to time, 
the Sixth day come fortnight after the end of ev r y Quarter, by nine 
of the clock in the morning, & that no p r son do fail to do his duty, 
on penalty of being fined Twenty shill : to the use of the Colledge as 
also to satisfye all dammage the Coll shall sustaine by their neglect. 

2. The Steward shall take the sole care of, and provide at the cur- 
rant prices all necessary & meet provisions with utensills, for the Offices 
both of the Cook and Butlar, according as the Colledge Occasions 
wheth r ordinary or Extraordinary shall from time to time require 
& seasonably deliver the same to the respective Offices. 6 He shall 
keep an exact & true Account of all such disbursem ts & quarterly 
shall require and receive of the Butlar & Cook an Account of the 
p r ticular Debto r s to the Colledge, and shall p r sent the same so re- 
ceived together with his own, unto the President for his Examina- 
tion and Approbation, the which being passed by the President, the 

1 " & " is interlined. 

3 The square brackets are in the original. The reference is to page [37] of the 
text, or pages 205-206 of this volume. 

3 Written in the upper right margin of page [33]. 

4 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Wadsworth. The refer- 
ence is to page [63] of the text of College Book I, or page 45 of this volume. 

5 The third letter in this word has been altered. 
9 A word or letter is here crossed out. 



202 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Steward shall forth with require the same of the severall Debto r s, 
& shall p r sonally stand ingaged to respond & pay the same to the 
Colledge. 

3. The Steward shall deliver in to the Butlar his bread, at 5 shill. 
the bushell, allowing to ev r y bushell 70 Loaves, the weight of ev r y 
loafe being proportionable to the currant price of wheate as in the 
country Statute, for wheate bread ; and shall deliver in his Beer, at 2 
shill : the Barrell, each Barrell consisting of 16 Beer Gallons, allowing 
thereunto a peck of malt. 

[34] 

4 The Steward is from time to time to pay the Colledge officers, 
viz. The Tuto r s, Cook, Butler & Bellringer, their respective dues & 
Sallaryes & also to allow the monito r s Account. 

5. The Steward shall be accountable & pay unto the Treasurer 
Quarterly what shall be given in, in the Quarter-Bill, in the Account 
of Study Rents & glass mending. 

6. The Steward shall be allowed in his Accompts. 5 fi quarterly for 
his Salary. 

7. The Butlar & Cook are to look unto & in case Detriment befall, 
fully to be accountable for all the Colledge vessells & vtensills great & 
small, delivered by Jnventory unto them, and on ev r y Quarter to de- 
liver in unto the corporation in writing, an Jnventory thereof, p r ticu- 
larly shewing w fc detriment is befallen the Colledge & by what means, 
wheth r by wearing, in the just usage (which the steward is to repair at 
the colledge charge) or by any abuse of any p r son or p r sons whoev r , 
from whom the Corporation shall see that the Butlar & Cook shall 
have just & full recompence, if they be members of the Society : But 
if detriment come by any out of the Society, then those Officers them- 
selves shall be responsible 2 to the house, because they may not but at 
their perrell comunicate w l is the Colledges to any without. 

8 The Butler & Cook are to see that the s d vtensills to their severall 
Offices belonging from day to day be kept cleane & sweet & fitt for 
use ; and they shall at meall times deliver them out, as the publique 
service of the hall requireth to the servito 1 * or servito r s who shall be 



1 Written in the upper left margin of page [34]. 

2 Altered from " responsable." 



DUTIES OF THE COLLEGE SERVANTS, 1667 203 

responsible for them, untill they returne them, after meales, to the 
buttery & kitchen : But they are not bound to keep or cleanse any 
p r ticular Schollars Spoons, Cup, & similia ; but at their own discretion. 

9. Jf any Schollar or Schollars, at any time, take away or deteine, 
any vessell of the Colledge, great or small, from the Hall, out of Doors, 
from the sight of the Buttery Hatch, without the Butlers or Servi- 
to r s knowledge or against their will ; he or they shall be punished 3 d : 
but more at the Presidents or fellows discretion, if perverseness ap- 
peare : But if he or they shall p r sume to deteyne any vessell great or 
small that it be wanting the next meale, he shall be punished 12 d . 
[35] and in case any shall loose, marr 1 or spoyle any such vessell, then 
shall they pay the full vallue thereof; and as the matter may be cir- 
cumstanced shall be alsoe lyable to what further punishment the 
Corporation shall judge meet. 

10. The Butlar & Cook shall see that all the Rooms peculiar to 
their Offices together with their appurtenances be sett and kept in 
order, cleane and sweet from all manner of noysomUess and nastiness 
and sensible Offensiveness : To the Butlar belong the Cellar & But- 
tery and all from thenceforth to the furthest end of the Hall with the 
South porch ; To the Cook, the Kitchen, Larder, the way leading to his 
Hatch the Turrett, and the North Ally 3 to the walk. 

11. Neither shall the Butlar or Cook suffer any Schollar or Schollars 
whoev r , except the ffellows, masters of Art, & ffellow-Comon r s, or 
Officers of the house, to come into the Buttery or Kitchen save with 
their parents, or Guardians, or with some grave and sober strangers ; 
and if any shall presume to thrust in, he shall be punished 3 d , but if 
presumptuously & continually, they shall so dare to offend, they 
shall be lyable to an Admonition, & to oth r proceeding of the Colledge 
discipline, as the Corporation shall determine. 

12. The Butlar & Cook shall not deliver at meal-times save in case 
of sickness, or other just & allowable causes, any commons to any 
schollars, save unto the servito r s, nor they to any save their dues to 
the Schollars sitting orderly in their places. 

13. Neither the Cook nor the Butlar shall put any Schollar into or 
out of Comons but by order from the President or his Tuto r . 

1 The last two letters in this word have been altered. 

2 Written in the upper right margin of page [35]. 

3 Altered from " ally." 



204 COLLEGE BOOK III 

14. The Cook receiving provisions at currant price shall deliv r the 
same out to the Schollars, advanceing one halfe penny upon a penny. 

15. The Cook for the faithfull discharge of his office shall be 
allowed by the Colledge, Thirty pound per annum and his commons. 

[36] 

16 The Butler receiving his Beer from the Steward, single Beer at 2 
shill. & double at 4 s the barrell shall advance four pence upon the 
shilling. 

17 The Butler shall take a distinct Account of the Comons of the 
Schollars that are absent from meales, which shall be reserved for the 
Colledge use. 

18 The Buttlar upon ev r y 6 th day at noon shall give an Account 2 to 
ev r y Schollar demanding his weeks sizings in the Buttery ; & he is not 
bound to stay above halfe an hour at breakfast in the buttery, after the 
Tolling of y e bell ; nor above a quarter of an hour after thanksgiving 
in the Hall, at meales. 

19. The Buttler shall provide candles for the Hall both for prayer 
& supper receiving for that end from the Steward, 20 shill : in silver or 
the vallue thereof in candles, to be put proportionably on ev r y Schollar 
whose Name is in y e Buttry 

20. The Butler for the faithfull discharging of his Office shall receive 
from the Colledge 12 h per Annum. 

21. The Schollars of the house shall take a strict Account 3 of all 
the buildings, Chambers, Studyes &, fences, belonging to the Colledge 
& shall give an account quarterly to the Treasurer w* dammage the 
Colledge hath susteyned in any of the aforementioned p r ticulars & by 
whom. 

22. No Schollar shall enter into, or leave the possession of any 
Chamber or Study untill Some one of the Schollars of the house have 
viewed the State thereof, which they shall represent unto the Treas- 
urer, and in case any shall leave a Study in any Chamber, wherin 
some do yett remaine, such as remaine shall stand charged with the 
care of the vacant Studyes. 



1 Written in the upper left margin of page [36]. 

2 The letter "u " in this word is interlined. 

3 The letter "u" in this word is interlined. 



fellows' ORCHARD, 1645 205 

23. The Bell-Ringers office is to ring the Bell (except for meales) 
to keep the clock & to call the president to prayrs; for which he 
shall receive from the Steward five pound per annum. 

At a meeting of the Corporation. June. 10. 1659. 

Whereas there are great Complaynts of the exorbitant practises of 
some Students of this Colledge by their abusive words and Actions to 
the Watch of this Towne. The Corporation accounting it their duty 
by all lawfull means to seek the redress thereof for the future, do 
hereby declare to all p r sons to whom it may Concerne, That the Watch 
of this Towne from time to time & at all times shall have full powr of 
Inspection into the mann r s, and Orders of all p r sons related to the Col- 
ledge whether [ 37 ] within or without the precincts of the s d Colledge coii. Lawesi 
houses & lands, as by law they are impowred to act in Cases within 
the limmitts of their Towne, any Law usage or Custome to the Con- 
trary notwithstanding. Provided always wee judge it not conveni- 
ent neither doe wee allow that any of the s d Watchmen should lay 
violent hands on any of the Students being found within the pre- 
cincts of the Colledge yards, otherwise 2 then so as they may secure 
them untill they may informe the President or some of the fellows, 
who will take care to examine the matter for the effectuall healing of 
all such disorders. Also in case any Student of this Colledge is 
found absent from his lodging after nine of the Clock at night he 
shall be responsible for and to all Complaynts of disorder in this 
kind, that by Testimony of the watch or oth r s shall appeare to be 
done by any Student of the Colledge as shall be adjudged guilty of 
the s d Crimes unless he can purge himselfe by sufficient witnesse. 

Extractum Doni Pomarii Sociorum per Johannem Bulkleium. 

Decemb. 20. 1645. 

Noverint universi per presentes, Quod Egomet Johannes Bulkleius, • 
nuper studens Collegii Harvardini, dono Henricum Dunsterum dicti 
Collegii Presidem, utpote eidem ob plurima atque ampla accepta 
beneficia devinctissimus, mea parte Illius Jugeris, quod Ipse cum 

1 Written in the upper right margin of page [37]. 

2 The first two letters in this word have been altered. 



206 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Domino Downingo, Samuele Winthropo ' & Johane 2 Alcoke eminus a 
Patre-familias Marrit; viz. Quarta parte pomarii dudum a nobis 
plantati, & dimidium reliqui manentis adhuc agrestis: ut dum hie 
Preses vixerit pro Sua vendicet, ordinetq?^; Sin aliquando Prsesi- 
dium exuerit, aut in eodem vita defunctus fuerit, turn velim, ut Col- 
legium tanquam Xeirrbv Tenue, ab alumno maxime benevolo sibi in 
perpetuum appropriaret. 

Hsec Ego, propria manu 
Johannes Bulkleius. 
[Pomarij supradicti Exemplar exhibitum est, in hujus Libri, 
Pagina : 3 ] 

[38*] 

[39] 

At a meeting of the Overseers. 24 th . 8. 1654. 

Jt is agreed by the Overseers that the Rev d m r Richard Mather and 
the Rev d m r John Norton speak with the Rev* 1 . m r Charles Chauncey 
and as they shall see cause encourage him to accept of an Jnvitation to 
the Presidentship of the Colledge, in case the Overseers shall give him 
a call thereto. 

The Care and Governement of Harvard Colledge for the present 
time & untill a President shall be orderly elected and confirmed is 
committed by the Overseers unto the ffellows of the Colledge. 

At a meeting of the hon d & Rev d Overseers of the Colledge. 2. 9. 1654. 

m r Mather and m r Norton are desired by the Overseers of the Col- 
ledge to tender unto the Rev d m r Charles Chauncy the place of Presi- 
dent, with the Stipend of One hundred pound per annum to be payd 
out of the Country Treasury: And withall to signify to him, that it is 
expected and desired that he forbeare to disseminate or publish any 
Tenets conc r ning the necessity of immersion 5 in Baptisme & Celebra- 

1 The letter " W " in this word is written over another letter or letters. 

2 The scribe intended to write " Johanne," but made only one downward 
stroke in the first " n." 

a The bracketed entry is in the hand of President Holyoke. The brackets are 
in the original. 

< Page [38] is blank. 

& Altered from "Emersion." 



GIFTS OF PLATE, LAND, AND BOOKS 207 

tion of the Lords Supper at Evening, or to oppose the received Doc- 
trine therein. 

At a meeting of the Hon d & Rev 11 Overseers of Harvard Colledge, 
at the Colledge Hall in Cambridge. 27. 9. 1654. 

The Rev* 1 m r Charls Chauncy was solemnly inaugurated into the 
place of President; 
S r Shepard, S r Hooker & S r Ambrose were chosen fellowes. 

[40] 

m r Henry Dunster consented to remove out of the Presidents house 
by the last of March next. 

ffebruary. 28. 1655. 

m r Samuel Nowell and S r Moody were chosen ffellows of the 
Colledge 

Aug. 12. 1656. 
m r Samuel Bradstreet was chosen ffellow of the Colledge. 

Sundry peices of plate given to the Colledge. 

By m r Thomas Langham ffellow Comon r , A peice to vallue of 
Three pound three shill. & ten pence. It 1 is one Silver Beer Bowl. 

m r Ven ffellow Commoner, One fruite dish & one silver Sugar 
spoon & one Silver tipt jug. 

M r Richard Harris One great Salt & 2 one small Trencher Salt. 

John Hayward late of Charlstowne decead, bequeathed to the Col- 
ledge, a Tract of land scittuate lying & being in Watertowne & is ad- 
joyning to the great ffresh pond, conteyning by Estimation twenty 
ac r s more or less. 

The Rev d m r Ezekiell Rogers, late Pasto r of the Church at isw.* 
Rowly decead, by his last will, gave & bequeathed to the Colledge, 
part of his library ; & the Reversion of his house & lands in case, as 
is in his will more p r ticularly provided. 

1 This word is blotted. 

2 This word is blotted. 

3 This marginal entry is apparently in a different hand. 



208 COLLEGE BOOK III 

[41] 

An Jnventory of the whole Estate of Harv d Colledge taken by the 

President & ffellows as they find the same to be Decemb. 10. 

1654 at which time the Accounts thereof were given, 

by M r Henry Dunster late President of the 

s d Colledge. 

Jnp r s. The building called the old Colledge, conteyning a Hall, 
Kitchen, Buttery, Cellar, Turrett & 5 Studyes & therin 7 Chambers 
for Students 1 in them, a Pantry & small come Chamber. A library 
& Books therin, vallued at 400 a . 

Jt. Another house called Goffes Colledge, and was purchased of 
Edw: Goffe, conteyning five Chambers. 18 Studyes. a Kitchen Cellar 
& 3 garretts 

Jt. The Presidents dwelling house, barne with 2 leantoes & other 
appurtenances. 

Jt. One small house unfinished, intended for a printing house. , 

Jt. The lands upon which the afores d buildings are erected, and is 
adjoyning thereunto, the whole being about 3 ac r s, and about halfe 
an ac r e thereof planted with fruite Trees. 

Jt. One parcell of corne land in Cambridge neck of land conteyning 
about 3 ac r s & a halfe, now in the occupation of m r Joseph Cooke. 

Jt. A small piece of land lying before the Colledge & was formerly 
the houselott of Rob 1 Broadish. 

Jt. A grant of 2000 ac r s of land by the gen a court when a place con- 
venient to lay the same out shall be p r sented by the Corporation. 

Jt. m r Rob* Cooke of Charlstowne, his gift of a grant of eight 
hundred ac r s of land, made him by the gen H Court. 

Jt. A farme at Shawshin, conteyning two hundred ac r s, now in the 
occupation of John Parker, by lease for 21 yeares at rent of 10 shil- 
lings per annum at p r sent. 

[42] 

Jt. m r John Newgate of Boston his gift of five pounds per annum 
to be continued, as appeares by his Deed under his hand & seale. 



i Altered from " Studies.'* 



COLLEGE INVENTORY, 1654 209 

Jt. Seaventy ac r s of marsh land, lying in Rumny Marsh being the 
gift of m r John Coggan of Boston rented at 4 H per annum. 

Jt. Two small shops in Boston, the Gift of Maj r 1 Sedgwick to the 
Colledge, which shops are made voyd by m r William Phillips, at the 
Ship Taverne and the s d Ship Taverne house ingaged for the annuall 
payment of twenty shill. to the Coll : forever. 

Jt. m r John Wilson Sen r Pasto r of Boston Church, his gift of 
Twenty pound, to be p d ffourty shill: per annum, whereof 40 s is 
already payd. 

Jt. Six hundred ac r s of land lying upon merrimack River neer 
Andevo r , had of m r na.thaniel Ward for a debt of 20 a due from 
him to the Colledge. 

Jt. Wee find a Conditionall gift of 300 ac r s of land, made by M r 
Jsrael Stoughton. 

Jt. The East Gallery in Cambr. meeting house for the use of the 
Students vallued at 30 H . 

Jt. A printing press, with all its appurtenances, now in the occu- 
pation of Samuel Green Printer, the p r ticulars whereof are expressed 
in an Jnventory given in by the s d Printer to the Presid* vallued the 
whole at eighty pounds. 

Jt. Vtensills in the Buttery and Kitchen, the p r ticulars whereof are 
given in by the Butler in a writing now in the Presidents Custody. 

Plate belonging to the Buttery, namely. One Silver Salt, vallued 
5 a . I s . 3 d . at 5 s per ounce. One small Trencher Salt vallued at 
10 s . One beer bowle 2 a . 18 s . l d . One stone pott tipt with Silver. 20 s . 

Jt. Jn debts due to the Colledge. The Lady Moulsons gift viz. 
100 K . & m r Bridges gift of 50 s . with some oth r small gifts making 
the whole to be 162 H . 16 s . 4 d . now in the Countreys hand, for w ch 
the Country allows the Colledge annually 15 fl for 4 Scholarships 
that being the Jntent of the dono r s. 

[43] 

Jt. By the Stewards booke, from severall Students & other p r sons, 
four hundred seaventy one pound eleven shill: three pence halfe 
penny. 



i " Maj r " has been written over a word undecipherable, perhaps "m 1 



210 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Colledge is Debtor. 

Jnp r s. To m r Henry Dunster late Presid* upon 

ballance of all Acco ts the Summe of 

Jt. To the Steward for the dyet of severall ffellows 

now removed from the Colledge 93.14.4. 

Jt. To the Steward for severall debts judgd lost ... 44.9.1. 

Jt. To the Steward personally 117.12.9.f 

Jt. To severall p r sons in the Stewards Book 10. 14.8. J 

Jt To severall of the Stud t9 for mony by them dis- 
bursed for y r Studyes & Gallery room 

Aug. 24. 1663. 

m r Samuel Elliott, m r Peter Bulkeley, m r Nathaniel Chauncy 
were chosen ffellows of the Colledge. 

November. 28. 1666 

m r Thomas Graves, m r Solomon Stoddard S r Nowell were chosen 
ffellows of y e Colledge. 

March. 27. 1667 

m r Solomon Stoddard was chosen Library keeper 
The Treasurer is ordered to provide necessary Vtensills for the Col- 
ledge, Kitchen & Buttery, not exceding 50 pounds. 

[44] 

January. 1. 1667. 

m r Joseph Pynchon chosen a probation 1 " ffellow, the Jun r Sophister 
committed to his care. 

October. 4 th 1669. 

Ordered by the Corporation, that m r Thomas Danforth be desired, 
& upon his consent engaged, to pay unto the ffellowes the money due 
by Charlstowne fferry and to provide Wood and other conveniences 
for them, and alsoe to give them a Bill to m r Richards the Treasurer 
of what is due to them of the Remaind 1 " of their Salary once a year. 

Ordered that three pounds be allowed by the Steward to Goodm 
Taylor tow* 13 the discharge of the charges of his sons commencem*. 
and that the money be repayed either by the money coming from the 
Eastward, (if it be attainable) or else to be allowed out of m r Webs 



cJ 



* 




h. 



****** 




t: 









2 



N&s 





1 1 
I I 

tw 1 






^ 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1669-1671 211 

gift, abating 15 shill: a peice from the mony aforesd distributed 
among four persons. 

Ordered that the Revenues of m r Webs gift be distributed for the 
following yeare as followeth. viz* to S r Shephard four pounds, to Hig- 
ginson three pounds: to Corlett three pounds, to Addams three 
pounds. & this mony to be allowed them by the Steward. 

Sewall * is elected Schollar of the house to succeed Epps. 

ffebr. 21. 16$ 

The Corporation ordered, that m r John Richards Treaf. shall 
pay to Fr. Willoughby Esq r . for 28 pewt r dishes weigh. 102 s . 3 pottle 
pots, at 6 s . p s . 18 8 . one 3 pint pot 4 8 . 6d Jtm to pay m r Shrimpton. 
2 l \ 9 s . 6 d . To the Presid* tow ds S r Taylo r s commencem* 1.0.0. To 
pay the Steward tow ds S r Taylo r s Commencem* 2. 0. 0. And the last 
three pound be well repayd to the Colledge Stock, out of the East- 
ward money. 

[45] 

September. 27. 1670. 

The Corporation ordered that the Revenues of m r Webs gift be dis- 
tributed the following yeare to the same p r sons y* it was the last year, 
unless some be discontinuers. 

Ordered, That the Butler have 4 or 5 pounds given him for the year 
currant, to encourage him in his work, out of y e moneys given the 
Colledge for the Encouragem* of poor Schollars. And that the Cor- 
poration will speake to the Overseers (the first opportunity) to enlarge 
his Stipend. 

Aug. 1. 1671 

The Corporation ordered, that the Trear pay to Taylo r the Butler, 
five pounds in Cash out of the Colledge Treary; w ch was promisd 
to s d Butler for the faithfull discharge of his place. 

Novemb. 15. 1671 

The Corporation ordered, that m r Webs gift, (from Aug. 71 to 
Aug. 72) be thus distributed, to S r Shepard 4 pouds to S r Higginson. 
3 pounds. To S r Corlett. 3 pounds. To Emerson. 3 pounds. Except 
some of them become discontinuers. 

1 Apparently altered from "Sewell." 



212 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Febr. 12. 1671 

Ordered by the Corporation, that S r Thatcher & Alcock continue 
Schollars of the house ; That Pyke & Allen be substituted in the oth r 
2 vacant places. That Minot be Monito 1 ". 1 That the 3 pounds of m r 
Webs gift allowed to S r Corlett for the year currant be given to 
Hawley, & y* only one Quart r s pay be given to S r Corlett, because of 
his discontinuance. 

[46] 

An Abbreviate of the Colledge Accounts, conteyning both receits 

and disbursements from October. 1654 untill Decemb. 1663. 

Extracted out of the Colledge Books, made and given 

in by Thomas Danforth. Trear 

Harvard Colledge is Debto r 

Jnp r s. To m^ Dunster in full of her demands 020 00 00 

To Table linnen and Utensills for ye Buttery 006 08 06 

To expences at m r Turners 007 03 06 

To Sallaryes & Allowances payd to the ffellows & other Colledge 

Officers for 9 years past 445 18 06 

To repairs of the Edifices, Presidents Lodge and fences &c. for 9 years 

past 337 11 01 

To loss in peage received at 8 a penny 055 06 11 

To freight of a chest of Books 001 00 00 

To m r Carter 005 00 00 

To a stags head sent to England to a Benefato 1- 000 10 00 

To moneys payd for exchange of a Bell 006 02 06 

To a parcell of land on wch the Coll. now stands * 020 10 00 

To a Debt p d Ensigne Sherman 005 00 00 

To m r Elliots order, part of m r Saltonstalls gift 037 07 00 

To the use & supply of m r Saltonstalls Son 017 10 08 

To m r Chancey by order of the Overseers 040 00 00 

To ditto, for sundry disbursem ts 048 08 02 

1 Altered from "Minito 1 "." 

2 At the bottom of the page is written in pencil : 

" on which the Coll. now stands " is an interpolation, not written by Treasurer Dan- 
forth, at the above named date, if by him at all, and probably written as late as the year 
1683. The College referred to was the 2 d Harvard, which was burnt in 1764, & on the 
site whereof the 3d Harvard Hall was built. 

After the above entry, also in pencil, is written : 
" (Th. Wm. Harris's pencilling.)." 

The words " on w cn the Coll. now stands " were perhaps written later but are 
certainly in Danforth's hand. 






ABBREVIATE OF COLLEGE ACCOUNTS, 1654-1663 213 

To m r Edw d Rawson a debt of 000 12 00 

To loss in a Colt had in p* of Wards legacy 007 10 00 

To a brass copper 006 00 00 

To boards had for Colledge use 009 08 00 

To so much p d the p r sent fellows 002 16 00 

To ballance so much resting in Stock 459 17 11 

1540 00 09 

459 17 10 l 

1080 2 11 
[47] 

Harvard Colledge is C r . 

Jnp r s. Given towds the repayrs of the Edifices. 1654. 

By Richard Bellingham Esq r 040 2 00 00 

By m r John Newgate 010 00 00 

By m r James Oliver 010 00 00 

By Charlstowne 009 09 00 

By m r John Allen of Dedham 009 00 00 

By m r Hezekiah. Usher 008 00 00 

By m r William Colbrun 006 10 00 

By m r Richard Russell 005 00 00 

By m r Theodor. Adkinson 005 00 00 

By m r Peter Oliver 005 00 00 

By Cap* Keyne 003 10 00 

By m r Edw. Jackson 002 12 06 

By m r Jncrease Nowell 002 10 00 

By Samuel Richardson 002 10 00 

By m r Samuel Danforth 002 00 00 

By m r Nicholas Davison 0013 io 00 

By m r John Stedman 001 00 00 

By m r Edmd. Angier . 001 00 00 

By m r Samuel Coale 001 00 00 

By a widdow of Roxbury 001 00 00 

By Elder ffrost of Cambridge 000 10 00 

By Richard Dana 000 09 00 

By Daniel Kempster 000 05 00 

127 15 06 

By rent of Charlstowne ferry in Peage at 8 a penny .... 328 10 00 

By rent of m r Coggans gift in Rumney Marsh 031 13 00 

By m r John Wilson Sen r gift of 40s per annum 018 00 00 

By m r John Newgates gift of 5 H per annu 043 15 00 

By Study rents for 3 years 057 15 00 

By revenue of the printing press received 020 00 00 



1 The figures printed in italics are written in pencil in a different hand. 

2 This figure has apparently been altered. 

3 This figure has apparently been altered. 



214 COLLEGE BOOK III 

By m r Richard Saltonstall i 453 03 03 

By rent due from M r W m Phillips 20 s per annu 009 00 00 

By rent of a farrne at Shawshin 005 10 00 

By the gift of M r William Paine 20 1 . & his son John. 1QP . . 030 00 00 

By M r W m Colbran.2 5 a &y e rent ofm r Webs house 6 H . ... 011 00 00 

By Cap 1 . Keynes legacy. 100 1 By p 1 3 of m r Wards Legacy 94 . 194< 00 00 

By m r Webs legacy. 50 a by Cap* Penelton in boards 5 H . . 055 00 00 

By the gift of m r Willoughby 016 00 00 

By Advance made of y e Colledge Stock by the Trear . . . 138 19 00 

1540 00 09 

[48] 

An Abbreviate of the Accounts of Harvard Colledge in Cambridge 
for 5 years past. Beginning in Decemb. 1663. 

Harvard Colledge is B D r 
Jnp r s. To Salleryes & allowances by order of the Overseers payd to 

the Presid* fellows & oth r Offic r s of the Colledge 305 07 03 

To the Expences of S r Noyes in the Colledge by order of the Overseers 048 00 00 
To the Expences of Shepard, Higginson, S r Predon & Addams. Jn the 

Colledge by Order 013 00 00 

To so much allowed m r Nowell, m r fflint, S r Woodbridge, S r Ather- 

ton, S r Whitman &S r Adkinson, tow** 3 the Expenses in the Colledge, 

they being orderly admitted Schollars of the house 075 00 00 

To so much allowed W m Bordman, when he was the Steward of the 

house, for ballancing his Account of 6 disbursem t3 036 08 11 

To so much allowed m r Lindon for his disbursem ta on the house at 

Boston that was m r Webbs gift to the Colledge 033 06 00 

To so much disbursed for brass peut r & linnen 014 08 00 

[Jn. 1664. oc 1665 063 19 00 

To disbursem* 3 for y e Coll. Edifices \ Jn. 1666 015 12 11 

(jn. 1667 & 1668 059 08 11 

To so much disbursed for Entertainm 1 of the hon d Overseers of the 

Coll. at Boston & Cambridge 002 12 07 

To so much allowed for the Transportacon of 100 u in corne & 

meate. from Hartford to Boston 007 06 00 

674 09 11 
To ballance y e Ace* resting in Stocke 863 04 09 

1537 14 08 7 

1 Here is written in pencil " £104." 

2 This name has been altered. 

8 Apparently altered from "y l ." 
4 Apparently altered from " 094." 
6 Altered from " in." 

6 Written over " with." 

7 Near the bottom of page [48] are scribbled in pencil the following figures : 

674.09.11 
108 0. 2.11 

1754.12.10 



ABBREVIATE OF COLLEGE ACCOUNTS, 1663-1668 215 

[49] 

Harvard Colledge is C r 

Jnp r s. By so much resting in Stock. Decern. 1663 459 17 11 

By the rent of the house in Boston y* was m r Webs gift, for eight 
yeare & -|. at 13 a per annu. ending Novemb. 15. 1668. abating 6 tt 

charged in form r account 099 12 06 

By Study rent for five yeare now past 150 06 06 

By rent of Rumney Marsh y* was m r Coggans gift for 5 years at 3 H 

per annum . 015 00 00 

By the full of 20 H given by the Rev<* m r Jn° Wilson. Sen r 002 00 00 

By the rent of a ffarme at Billerica, being the gift of Cambridge Towne 

& m r Henry Dunster 004 05 00 

By rent due from W m Phillips, for a shop in Boston y* was the gift 
of Majo r Rob* Sedgwick at 20 s per annu. for five years now 

past 005 00 00 

By a Legacy given by Rouse of Charlstowne 002 10 00 

By the gift of Bridget Windes of Charlstown Widdow. mony ... 004 00 00 

By a Legacy given by Thomas Peirce of Charlstowne 001 00 00 1 

By the gift of m r Wilson Merch* in pewt r flaggon 000 10 00 

By a Legacy given by Cap* Richard Sprague of Charlstown . . . 030 00 00 
By a Legacy given by the wor tt Edward 2 Hopkins Esq r late of Hart- 
ford deceased in come and meate 100 00 00 

By a Legacy given by Cap* Rob* Keyne, out of the reversion of his 

wives Thirds, not yet received 147 00 00 

By so much receiv d of the Steward tow ds the charges for repayring 

the glass of the Colledge 002 14 05 

By so much in y e hands of the Country Treasurer, being the gift 
of the Lady Moulson. 100 s & of M r Bridges. 50 1 . & oth r small 

gifts the whole being 162 16 04 

By the advance of the Stocke for 5 years past, besides the rents 

above expressed 191 02 00 

By y e rent of the ferry 5 years at 2 7 H per anu 135 00 00 

By y? annuity given 3 by m r Jn° Newgate of Boston deced. being 
5 a per ah f or 5 yeers past is 025 00 00 

1537 14 08 4 



1 These figures have been altered. 

2 Originally there was a blank space here, later filled in by President Leverett 
with " Edward." 

3 The " g " is apparently written over " R." 

4 At the bottom of page [49] are scribbled in pencil the date " 1668 " and the 
following figures : 

1540 
1537.14.08 



3077.14. 8 
459.17.11 

2617.16 9 



216 COLLEGE BOOK III 

[50] 

An Account of the Colledge Stock, ffeb. 1. 1668. 

m r Wilt m Phillips behind for rent Oil 00 00 

Rob 1 Burges & Ingolls for Rumney Marsh 006 00 00 

Behind of m r Coales gift 000 04 00 

Thomas Hawkins by a Bill receivd of m r Payne in part of m r Wards 

Legacy 022 00 00 

Ditto, for intrest behind 006 08 00 

m r Richard Parker by bill, payable in wheate 010 13 04 

The Executo r s of m r Joseph Jewet of Rowly by bill do owe in money . 060 00 00 

Ditto behind for Jntrest. 23. 2. 1668 007 01 00 

m r John Russell Sen 1 " of Hadly. in wheate & Pork do owe by Bill . . 068 15 00 

m r Antipas Newman by bill, do owe in money 002 1 00 00 

Pequott. Cap* George Denison is D r by Bill in money 020 00 00 

Ditto, is D r for Jntrest behind. 16. 7. 68 008 00 00 

Christopher grant is D r in provision 014 00 00 

Billerica. W m Chamberlain is D r by Bill in wheate 006 00 00 

Ditto is D r . for intrest 000 16 00 

Brantree. Christopher Webb is D r . in wheate per Bill 014 00 00 

Billerica. Daniel Shed is D r . in wheate by Bill 014 00 00 

John Swan is D r . in Come ab* 002 00 00 

fTrancis Willoughby Esq r hath in his hands mony 075 00 00 

Ditto, in provisions he receiv d of L 1 Bull for m r Hopkins gift .... 092 14 00 

Ditto, for Jntrest of the abovs d Summs 025 10 00 

Jn° Bernard of Watertown D r in provisions 011 10 00 

Henry Green of Rumny Marsh. D r . in a Cow & wheate for y e Rent 2 

yeare 005 16 00 

Christopher Webb. D r . for Jntrest. 26. 8. 68 003 06 00 

The Country Trear. hath in his hands mony y* was y e gift of Lady 

Moulsons. 100. m r Bridges 50 11 & oth r small gifts the whole is . . 162 16 4 

A p* of a house y* was Cap 1 Keynes of 2 Boston vallued at 152 10 00 

Jn Sheep Come & Cattle under y e Trear dispose 060 12 01 

863 04 09 

[51] 

ffebr. 1. 1668. 
The Colledge Estate in houses lands & annuityes is as followeth. 

Jnp r s. One house at Boston, the gift of m r Web. rented at 013 00 00 

Jn Rumney Marsh about 70 ac r s rented at 003 00 00 

Jn Billerica 200 ac r s of land, rented at 001 00 00 

The Rent of Charlstown ferry in mony 027 00 00 

besides the ferrage of the Corporation & now they are to add 10 

shill : more per annu 000 10 00 



1 This figure has been altered. 

2 Apparently written over " at; " or perhaps "at" written over "of. 



BURIAL OF PRESIDENT CHAUNCY, 1672 217 

Annuity given by m r Newgate out of his farme at Rumney Marsh 005 00 00 
Annuity to be p d by W m Phillips 001 00 00 

Jn Pequott Country 2000 ac r s of land 

A farme of 600 * ac r s purchased of M r Ward 



50 10 00 



This Account conteyned in the foregoing pages perused 
by the Corporation is allowed. 

feb. 1. 1668. 

Charles Chauncy Presid* 

Lands scittuate in Cambridge belonging to the Colledge; 

One wood lott conteyning 6 ac r s on Southside Charles River. 

One wood lott lying in Cambridge bounds neer spye-pond, con- 
teyning ab fc 6 ac r s. 

One p r cell of upland on the Southside of Charles River, conteyning 
40 ac r s, being the gift of the Towne to the Colledge. 

All the aboves d stand Recorded in Cambridge Towne-Book. 
Also 40 ac r s of land on South side of Charles River being the gift of 
m r Richard Champney, as will appeare by his last will & testament. 

[52] 

Jtem. There is also belonging to the Colledge Stock a Legacy of 5 
pound per annum, by the last will & Testament of m r John Glover 

By the Overseers. March. 7. 1671. 

Ordered that the disbursem ts for the buriall of the late Presi- 
dent, the Rev d m r Charles Chauncy decead shall be discharged by 
the Colledge Treasurer, and the Treasurer is ordered to examine & 
allow of s d Account. 

N. B President Chauncy died Feb^ 19. 1671 3 

1 The " 6 " in this figure has been altered. 

2 " Boston," underscored, is written above " Dorchester," underscored but 
not crossed out. 

3 This "N. B " is in a different hand. 



218 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Decemfc. 5. 1667. 

P r sent 

Ri : Bellingham Esq r Gov 1 " m r Sam : Danforth 

ffrancis Willoughby Esq 1- Dep* m r Jonathan Mitchell 

Dan : Gookin Esq r m r Jncrease Mather 

Ri : Russell Esq r [w] r 

Jn°. Leverett Esq 1 " m r Charls Chauncy Pres dt 

m r . Ri : Mather. [w] r Tho : Graves 

m r Jn° Mayhew [m] T Solom : Stoddar 

m r Jn° Elliot Sen r [m] r Alexander Nowell 
m r Jno Sherman. T. D.i 

Whereas there are obstructions in the Colledge touching providing 
for the Schollars in poynt of dyett & the present Steward Will : Bord- 
man hath declared his resolution to lay down that Trust & office, 
the Overseers with the consent of the President & ffellows do re- 
quest m r Thomas Danforth to take the care & charge of that affaire 
for one yeare, that so due & necessary provisions be made for the 
Schollars as is requisite. 

And the Overseers with the President & ffellows do declare, that 
if he shall please to inspect that affaire that so former inconveniences, 
under w ch the Colledge hath laboured may be prevented for the future, 
all meet Encouragement shall be allowed unto him. 

1668. 

m r Thomas Danforth made resignation of his place & Office of 

Treasurer of the Colledge. And accepted at the Desire of the 

)nomicaii Overseers, as above is expressed, to inspect the Affairs of the 

BoftheCol- ,-„,., . - i • 

Colledge, 3 and to take care for their necessary provisions. 

[53] 

June. 3. 1669. 

Cap 1 John Richards being chosen by the Overseers with the con- 
sent of the President and ffellowes. Treasurer of the Colledge; the 
Severall Bonds Obligations, &c. conteyning the Debts due to the Col- 
ledge, as is more p r ticularly expressed pag. 40. 41. 4 were by the late 

1 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

2 This marginal entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is underscored. 
» The words " Affairs of the Colledge " are underscored. 

* The reference is to pages [50-51] of the text, or pages 216-217 of this 
volume. 






LEONARD HOAR ELECTED PRESIDENT, 1672 219 

Treasurer deliverd unto the s d Cap* John Richards by Order of the 

Overseers of the Colledge. In the p r sence of 

Richard Bellingham Gov r 
Simon Bradstreet. Esq r 
Samuel Simonds. Esq r 
Daniel Gookin. Esq r 

Henry Henly Esq r , of Lime in Dorsetshire gave to the Colledge, 
Twenty seaven pounds. Whereof the Overseers being informed, they 
ordered Cap* John Richards Trear, to receive the same, & to returne 
the Dono r a Letter of Thankfullness in the Name of the Overseers. 

Boston. June 3. 1669. 

June. 3. 1669 

Whereas severall well-minded p r sons in the Towne of Portsmouth, 
upon Pascataqua River have voluntarily engaged themselvs to 
give freely tow ds the Jncouragem* of the Colledge at-O Sixty pound 
per anum for 7 years next coming ; 

The Overseers do order that the s d gift shall be disposed of in manner 
following, viz* 

[54] 

To the sen r ffellow as an Addition to his Salary Sixteen pounds per 
annum. 

To the second ffellow, Eleven pounds per annum. 

To the third ffellow, seven pounds per annum. 

And the Remainder to be for the Encouragem* of Schollars as 
the Overseers shall see meet to order. 

At a meeting of the Overseers 1 July. 2 30. 3 1672. 4 

: Docto r 5 Leonard Hoar was elected President of the Colledge. 
The which he accepting he was inaugurated. 10. 7. 1672. 6 

1 Written over " Corporation." 

2 Written over another word, perhaps " June." 

3 Written over another figure, perhaps " 27." 

4 Apparently altered from "1673." 

5 A word or two before " Docto 1 " " is crossed out. 

6 Cf. page [75] of College Book I, or pages 55-56 of this volume. 



220 COLLEGE BOOK III 

At a meeting of the Overseers. June. 20. 72. 

This following order 1 was made and agreed on. 

Whereas the Gen a Court having perused and considered the order 
of the Councill bearing date Sep 1 12. 1671. to promote a generall 
contribution for building a new Colledge at Cambridge, of brick or 
stone, as an addition unto Harvard Colledge, unto w ch there hath been 
a returne from severall Townes of considerable Summs subscribed for 
that work w ch publicke & pious designe & work the Court hath ap- 
proved, and by their order bearing date. May. 15. 1672 have referred 
it unto the Overseers of the Colledge to cause the s d good work to 
be prosecuted to effect. 

Jn pursuance whereof the Overseers of the Colledge do nominate, 
choose and appoynt Deacon John Cooper and m r William Manning of 
Cambridge, to be Agents & Stewards to mannage that work, both in 
hiring & paying workmen & Artificers, in procuring and purchasing 
materialls & in doing all oth r matters & things, referring to the build- 
ing and finishing the s d Colledge, & for this end they are hereby im- 
powred [55] and authorized joyntly and severally to receive all the 
contributions that are or shall be given for this work, and to give 
acquittances for the same, and faithfully to dispose what shall be 
received for the best advantage, keeping exact Acco ts of all receits & 
disbursem ts , The Overseers of the Colledge reserving for themselvs, 
the direction & appoyntment of the place, matter, forme and directions 
of this new building : Also do order that if at any time the s d Stewards 
shall meete with any obstruccon in this work they shall & may have 
recourse to the Overseers (or such Committee of them as they may 
appoynt) for advice and Assistance, and when the s d work is finished, 
and faithfull Acco ts given by the s d Stewards, the Overseers do prom- 
ise that meet recompence and allowance shall be made & give unto 2 
the said Stewards for their care & pains therein. 

Richard Bellingham Gov 1 " 

John Leveritt. Dep* Gov r 

Simon Bradstreet 

Daniel Gookin 

Daniel Denison 



i The final letter in this word has been altered. 
2 Altered from '.'. umto." 



213- 



. _ 







S*A 



\ - s4~~ Mm -%*«> 

\ j k** Jo ^^~^- U *~^jJ_ 



i?*« 



.'O 



v**' 






U* 



* - ' ■- _. 




I 







/w* 



./ 



'V 



DISSETTLEMENT IN THE COLLEGE, 1674 221 

William Hawthorne 
Edw* Tinge 
Richard Russell 
Eleazer Lusher 
William Stoughton. 

John Mayo 
John Oxenbridge 
Thomas Thatcher 
Samuel Danforth 
Jncrease Mather 

[56] 

Also as an Addition to this Order, the Overseers do desire and 
appoynt, the hon d Dep* Gov r Cap 1 Daniel Gookin, m r Thomas Dan- 
forth, m r Stoughton m r Shearman & m r Vrian Oakes, to be a Comittee 
for the Overseers, unto whom the Stewards for the buildings, may have 
recourse and receive ord r s and directions from them or any four of 
them. 

January. 20. 1672. 

The Overseers ordered the Trear to pay to D r Leonard Hoar, One 
hundred pound tow ds his Transportation from England hither. 

15. 7. 1673. 

m r Vrian Oakes, m r Thomas Shepard, m r Joseph Brown & m r 
John Richardson resigned up their fellowships. 

m r Daniel Gookin, m r Daniel Russell & m r Joseph Taylor being 
chosen by the Corporation fellowes of the Colledge, were allowed 
by the Overseers. m r Russell, & m r Taylor refused to accept said 
place. 

Novemfr. 10. 1674. 

The Overseers met & spent the day in prayer and humiliation with 
reference to some dissettlement in the Colledge. 



222 COLLEGE BOOK III 

[57] 

March. 15. 1675. 

Docto r Leonard Hoar made a resignation of his Presidentship of 
the Colledge. 

The Il o v* 1 m r Increase Mather 1 

1672 

The Voluntary Contributions made towards the new 
Edifice is as followeth 
Boston ab* 800 00 00 

Whereof S r Thomas Temple gave 100.00.00 

Benjamin Gibs 050.00.00 

Salem 130 02 03 

Whereof the Rev d m r Higginson gave : . . . 05 . 00 . 00 
m r William Brown sen r mony : . . . . 40.00.00 

m r Edmund Batter 20.00.00 

Cap 1 George Corwin 

Dorchester 067 04 11 

Lyn 020 00 00 

Watertowne 041 16 03 

Cambridge & the Village 199 01 08 

Jpswich 060 03 02 

Newberry 021 04 00 

1339 12 3 2 

[58] 

1339 12 S 3 

Charlstown 196 11 1 

Weymouth 039 10 00 

Brantree 087 14 00 

Rowly 040 08 05 

Dedham 061 12 00 

Whereof Ensigne Thomas ffuller gave . . . .5 a s d4 

Roxbury 037 16 08 

Concord 033 07 05 

Sudbury 024 00 08 

Marblehead 008 19 06 

1 These words have been erased, and in addition two lines have been drawn 
through them. 

2 The figures printed in italics are written in pencil. 

3 The figures printed in italics are written in pencil. 

4 This entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 



DONATIONS TO THE COLLEGE, 1669-1672 223 

Springfield 017 18 09 

Hadly 033 15 03 

Northampton 020 09 04 

Westfield 012 08 01 

Dover 032 15 00 

Kitterey 022 00 00 

Salisbury ab* ab* 017 00 00 

Topsfield 006 00 00 

Exeter 010 00 00 

2041 18 ll 1 

[59] 

2041 18 11 2 

Chelmsford 018 07 00 

Billerica 012 04 00 

Maulborough 011 11 08 

Glocester 005 00 00 

Andover 012 10 00 

Medfield • 007 16 00 

Milton 014 18 00 

Wenham 004 11 05 

Hingham 019 06 02 

Hull 003 18 00 

Redding 030 17 06 

Maldon 010 00 00 

Haverhill about about 018 10 06 

Scarborough 002 09 06 

Bradford 009 03 00 

Beverly 013 00 00 

Hatfield 014 02 06 

Woburne subscribed 00 — 27 ft — 02 s . — 00<* 27 2 0* 

2277 6 2* 

S r George Downing — English money 005 00 00 

Totall. 1895 02 09 

[60] 

Sundry Donations to the Colledge received by Cap* John 
Richards Trear. 

1669 ffrom a Gentleman in England by m r Pet: Serjeant .... 0270000 

1670 ffrom England by ditto Serjeant 020 00 00 

1672 By m r Henry Ashurst 100 00 00 

1 The figures printed in italics are written in pencil. 

2 The figures printed in italics are written in pencil. 

s The figures printed in italics are written in pencil. Also, at the bottom of 
page [59] various figures are scribbled in pencil. 



224 COLLEGE BOOK III 

1674 ffrom England by m r Pet : Serjeant 024 00 00 

1676 By Legacy of Judith ffinch in Corn. 20b ma d e 000 14 06 

1680 By David Wilton a Legacy 010 00 00 

1679 John Smedly Sen r of Concord 010 00 00 

1680 By m r Henry Clarke of Hadly a Legacy 050 00 00 

By Richard Russell Esq 1 " a Legacy. 100 : received in part . 031 13 4* 

1681 By S r Matthew Hoi wort hyes legacy 1234 02 06 

In part of m r Skarletts Legacy 010 00 00 

1681 2 Of M r Thomas Smith for paym* of M r Glov r s legacy of 5 fi per 

annum, from. feb. 10. 69. for 12 yeer 060 00 00 

1577 10 4 3 
1683 More Donations not containd in Cap* Richards Account. & 
are yet resting due to the Coll. 

m r Joseph Brown his legacye of . 100 00 00 

Deacon William Trusedales legacy 040 00 00 

m r Henry Ashworth legacy of 100 a in England 128 00 00 

Elder Pen a legacy for 2 Schollarships. 10 pound per annum, 

commencing from the Death of m ls Pen 
m r Sam 1 Wards legacy of Bumkin Jsland rented at 50 shil : 

P annum 

Behind & unp d of m r Russells legacy as above 069 00 

1914 10 4 A 

[61] 

Here follows the severall Orders, Appoyntments and Distributions 

made by the Corporation, during the time that Docto r Hoar 

did officiate, extracted out of the old Colledge-Book. 5 

October, l 8t 1672. 6 

Ordered by the Corporation, that m r Webs gift for the year Currant 
be thus distributed; to m r Shepard, 4 pounds, to S r Higginson 3 
pounds, to Hawly 3 pounds, & to Emmerson 3 pounds, unless some 
of them become discontinuers. 

Harvard Colledge in Cambr. Sept. 27. 1670 

The Presid* and ffellows do order the Trear to lett out the lands 
belonging to the Colledge in the Pequott Country, for such Terms 

1 These figures have been altered. 

2 Altered from " 1679." 

3 The figures printed in italics are written in pencil. 

* The figures printed in italics are written in pencil. 
« By " the old Colledge-Book " is meant College Book I. 
8 This date was originally written apparently "October 4 th 1669," though as 
the original words have been written over they are difficult to decipher. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1670-1672 225 

of years as he shall see best * for the improvem 1 of s d lands. Pro- 
vided where any have violently intruded & taken possession of any 
part of it, not to lease it out to them for more then seven yeare, & in 
case of their refusall to take lease thereof on equall terms that they 
forth-with quitt their possessions, & in case of refusall the Trear is 
forthwith to proceed to a legall Tryall for clearing the Colledge 
Jntrest 

Also whereas Cap 1 George Denison is indebted to the colledge & 
hath tendred a farme of 300 ac r s adjoyning to the Colledge lands. 
The Trear is ordered to accept of his proposall & in case they cannot 
agree on equall Terms, then forthwith to require Colledge Dues from 
him. 

[62] 

Also the Trear is ordered to call in all moneys due to the Colledge 
from any of remoter Towns, that it may be in a readiness to be dis- 
bursed for Colledge use. 

Also the Trear is ordered to rebuild the Presidents fences against 
the high way with a stone wall & pay for it out of the Colledge Treary. 

Also he is further ordered to procure a Copy of John Glovers will, 
so far as referrs to the Colledge. 

Also to take order for the receiving of the Printing press, w ch the 
Corporation for the Jndian Stock have ordred hither. 

January. 25. 1672 

m r Thomas Danforths Account was made up for the yeare past: 
and the ballance due to him 40 H 9 s ll d l ob is ordered to be payd him 
by the Treasurer. 

Febr. 3. 1672. 

Ordered by the Corporation, that m r Richard Russell be desired 
to give the Colledge Treasurer 2 162 lb 16 s 4 d that the Country hath of 
the Lady Moulson's gift to the s d Colledge, unless there be an assur- 
ance of the 15 H per annum, or some graunt to that effect. via. p. i.« 

1 The first letter in this word has been altered. 

2 Substituted for "an Acco* of," crossed out. 

3 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. The reference is 
to page [1] of the text, or page 172 of this volume. 



226 COLLEGE book in 

Also that the money due to a fellow p r m r - Glov r s will, viz* 5 11 
per annum to begin ffebr. 9. 1669. to the 10. 12. 72. be payd by 
m r Habb. Giov r to m r Nowells heirs, m r Joseph Brown, & m r 
John Richards in equall portions, & m r Richards to give orders to 
receive it. 

Also that m r Brown & m r Richardson give an Acco* of w* they have 
received of their Salaryes, that so they may be satisfyed. 

[63] 

May. 27 th 1673. 

m r Graves being treated with to accept of a ffellowship, declared 
to the Corporation that he was not free to accept it. whereupon. 

mr Daniel Gookin was chosen probation 1 " & is forthwith to take y e 
care of a Classis. 

The Corporation further ordered that m r Nath: Gookin succeed 
m r Jer : Shepard in injoying 4 pounds of m r Webs gift from the time 
of m r Shepards leaving it, during the Corporations pleasure. 

Agreed with m r Marmaduke * Johnson, that for the space of three 
years he shall have the use of the font of the Long Primier Letters for 
w ch he is to pay 30 sh in mony per annu. to the Colledge Trear, and 
deliv 1 " the President ten copyes of ev r y book he shall print. 

Septemfi. 15. 1673. 

73 m r Daniel Gookin being nominat d , Chosen & 2 presented by the 

■* Corporation was by the overseers approved and confirmd in his 

she° P ard! ffellowship : As also m r Daniel Russell & m r Joseph Taylor. Like- 

>L B rS w i se mr Joseph Browns resignation was taken as valid. NB. It sh d 

res/gn'd seem by what fol. Oct. 2. m r Oakes & m r Shepards Resignation was 

IwsuATe not taken for valid : if it had the Corporation, & Overseers w 4 have 

Express'd it, & not Sent as they did to 'em so Soon af[ter] 4 

Also m r Jo : Richardson this day resigned his ffellowship 



jrseers 
l Cambr 



i This name, in the hand of President Leverett, is written in a blank space. 

2 The words "nominat d , Chosen &" are interlined in the hand of President 
Leverett. 

3 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 
« The "N B." is in the hand of President Leverett. 



Nov. 20. 
Sewall wa 
to an< 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1673-1674 227 

Camnr. Oct. 2. 1673. 1 

Jt was Voted, That m r Urian Oakes, & m r Tho 3 Shepard be re- 
quest to continue their Assist to the College as Fellows according 
as they were formerly appointed thereto, & Cap* D. Gookin, & y e 
Presid* are desired to acquaint them w th the mind of the Overseers 
therein. 

Novemfi. 5. 1673. 

The Corporation ordered that m r Webs gift for this year be dis- 
posed as followeth. To Nath. Gookin. 4 a . To Emerson. 3 a . That 
Andrews be third to begin. Nov. 16. & continue to next August, unless 
any of these become discontinues. That the Presid* & Treasurer 
desire the overseers of m r Webs will to assent hereto, and if they 
please to name the fourth. 

S r 2 Sewall was chosen ffellow — And together with m r Daniel p^USta 
Gookin, installd before the Overseers Novemfc. 26. 83S&? th 

[64] 

Febr. 2. 1673. 

The wor n mr Thomas Danforths Acco ts were this day adjusted & 
the Colledge found in his debt, 13 11 . 13 s . 11. w ch he was authorized 
to receive of the Treasurer. 

Emerson for refusing to come to the President being twice sent for, 
is warned to make an acknowledgment in writing on ffriday next. 
And then to declame before the President, for going out of Town 
without leave. 

March. 1. 1674. 

Ordered that henceforth S r Sewall be Colledge-Library Keeper. 
And that m r Cheev r s son have the fourth Share of m r Webs gift, 
till August next. m r Webs Overseers consenting, & he continuing 
here. 



1 This entry, written partly in the margin, is in the hand of President Leverett. 

2 The letter " S" in this word is written over " M." 

3 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 



228 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Aprill. 15. 1674. 

Ordered, That if any sen r Student compell y e ffreshmen to go on 
Errands in studying time, both sender & goer shall be punished. 

That m r Gookin & s r Sewall ffellows have half a years Salary of 
their proportion out of Pascataqua-gift be forthwith payd them, by 
the Treasurer. Also fifty shill : apeice due in ffebruary last from m r 
Glov r s gift 

May 4. 1674. 

Ordered, that the undergraduates after declaiming shall deliv r a 
fair copy of their declamations to the President or sen r ffellow present, 
unless they have showed it before to their Tuto r . 

June 15. 1674. 

S r Thatcher chosen third ffellow of the Colledge. 

m r Marmaduke Johnsons bargain made, May. 27. 73 ordered to be 
confirmed by writings. And his priviledge of being seer ' to the col- 
ledge confirmed. 

Nov. 19. 1674. The Rev* 1 M r Samuel Danforth Past r of the Church 
in Roxbury and sen r Fellow of the Corporation of Harvard College 
in Cambridge dy'd. 2 

[65] 

At a Meeting of the Hon d and Rev* 1 Overseers of the College at Bost 

Dec. 3 d 1674 3 

The Overseers do comend it to the Presid* & the Fellows now re- 
maining, that they take care speediely to fill up their n° according to 
their Charter, that so their power and Priviledge granted them by the 
Gen 1 Court may not be weaken'd, or abated in any kind. Taken out 
of the Old Overseers Book. fol. 62. 4 



i So written by Danforth, but doubtless an error for " servV See page 
[77] of College Book I, or page 59 of this volume. 

* This paragraph is in the hand of President Leverett. 

3 Altered from "1673" or "1675." 

4 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written at the top of the 
page. By " the Old Overseers Book " is meant College Book II. 



CORPORATION MEETING, 1674 229 



Decemfc. 11. 1674. 

Present 
The Presid* 
M r Gookin 
S r Thatcher 
M r Richards 1 

The Overseers having consented, the Corporation order that 
Thomas Serjeant take his degree of Batchelor of Arts, from w ch by 
y m i. e the Corporation 2 he was suspended. 

The Rev d m r urian Oake, 3 m r Thomas Shepard, m r Jncrease math r Dec. n. 1674 

' ... FortheFillii 

chosen ffellows of the Colledge to fill up the corporation in its number £ p &* .? or P° r 

o r r tion in its Nui 

of seaven wch vote the Presid* is to acquaint them with and to receive ]£Yd^ociet 
y r answer in order to their Jnstallment. SS2"S?S 

m r Daniel Gookin was chosen Library-keep r . who is 6 to enquire SSmAji^S 
after the books found wanting in the last surveigh. intTnather 

Ordered that the benefitt of m r Webs gift be 7 added to the Col- s* college, w 

1 » «n i • • r» i i Vote the Presi 

ledge stock, till the corporation give further order. is Desired to a 

g L ° < quaint them wii 

That the vtensills belonging to the Buttery and Kitchen an & to rec / the 

00 «/ answer & \se 

Jnventory whereof follows, remains as they are & w r they are. only j£ n g; f SJJj 
the plate to be brought to the Presidents house, and that m r Gookin 
& m r Thatcher ask an acco* of the Colledge Linnen in Stewards 
hands. 

That the Trear gett the Colledge ffarme neer Pacatuck in Connecti- 
cut measured out, & agreeth with the Tennant, as he shall find best. 

The President is desired to p r sent the Laws made Aprill. 15. & May. 
4. 1674 to the ov r seers for y r Confirmation. 

That till. 25 of next march m r P. Thatcher have liberty to live in 
Boston, provided he Tutor the Schollars there residing 



1 The names of those present, in the hand of President Leverett, are written in 
the margin. 

2 The words "i. e the Corporation" are interlined in the hand of President 
Leverett. 

3 Altered from "Oakes." 

4 This word has been altered. 

5 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. By " Long Col- 
lege Book " is meant College Book I. The reference is to page [77] of College 
Book I, or page 59 of this volume. 

6 The last letter in this word has been altered. 

7 Written over another word. 



230 COLLEGE BOOK III 

That the Presid* be reimbursed his expences about the houses & 
lands of the Colledge. 

That the 4 p r sons who comenced Masters in y e year 1674, paying 
y r detriments 1 be abated 40 shill. apeice. 

[66] 

An Jnventory of the Colledge utensills belonging to the Kitchen & 
Buttery. Nov. 18. 1674. 

Kitchen 2 utensills. 

1. great Jron pott. 1. small Jron pott. 

5 Spitts. 2 Jron Racks. 2 Jron Trammells. 

1. Bar of Jron. 1. p r of Tongs. 1 Jron peale. 

2. Skillets. 2 Jron dripping pans. 1. Beif fork 

1. Lawn sieve. 1 Skimm r 1 brass Ladle. 1 Cleav r 
2 p r potthooks. 1 chopping knife. 1 pestle & mortar 
1. great Jron Skoale beam. 2 p r Skoals. 

1 half peck. 1 great Grid Jron. 1. small Jack. 

3. drye barrells. 52 pewt r platt r s. 11 Sawc r s 

2 pye plates. 2 frying pans. 1 payle. 

1 pretty big kettle. 3. Chafing dishes. 1. Little kettle 
1. wooden Tray. 1. Kneading Trough. 7. Barrells 

1 p r Slings. 1 Copp r . 1. rolling pin. 4 wood pastry-platts. 1 
Mustard Querne. 

Buttery utensills. 

Silver. 3. pound due from m r Pelham fellow Common 1 " in the 
hands of the Steward. 

2 Saltsellars. a little one & a great one. 
An earthen Jugg tipt with silver. 

1. Bowl. 2. Beak r s. one markd I B. th' oth r W W. 

one Silver Tanker, Sam 1 Parris gift, worth 7 a 10 3 

3. Silver Spoons. 

Pewter. 2 two-quart pots without lidds. 

1 threepinte pott with the Lidd off. 1 pint pot w th no lid 



1 The sixth letter in this ^Yord has been altered 

2 A letter before this word is crossed out. 



lofi^ ^*i 



fl^ojU *ry' 



artriA'L C\ 










in** 






-:..//;,„■ 'i»'*"'" 



habeJ^^tsL 4 6. 



I 



PLAN E 







INCREASE MATHER ELECTED PRESIDENT, 1675 231 

6 Bowls, two bruised ones without a foot 

4 Cuecups very defective. 4 eard Cups unfitt for service 

2 Salt sellars battered. 9 Juggs. of w ch 5 good. 

1 Tankard with the Lid on it. 4 brass Candlesticks 

1 flaskett. 1 Trunk. 3 desks. 1 buttry book. 1 brass tap 

2 fellow table cloaths. 2 Tables to put names on 

3 brass Candlesticks. Jn the Hall. 1 chaire 6 forms 

[67] 

Decemfr. 21. 1674. 

The corporation (on occasion of Thomas Serjeants going to sea 
next week) mett, & in pursuance of the order made. Decemfo. 11. he 
p r forming all exercises before them w ch were wont to be done in pub- 
lick, The President did admitt him to the degree of Batchelo r in the 
Arts. 

Novenrb. 10. 1674. 

The Overseers being informed of the sad and distressed Estate of 
m r Barnabas Chauncey, Son of m r Charles Chauncey deced late 
President of the Colledge, ordered y t the Treasurer of the Colledge 
pay ten pound in mony out of the Colledge Treasury for his present 
supply of * cloathing and bedding &c. 

At a meeting of the Hon d & Rev d Overseers of the College 
at Cambridge 15. 1. 1674. 5. 2 

m r Urian Oakes & m r Tho s Shepard being orderly Electf^] 
Fellows of the College & presented by the Cor por aeon for thepr] 
allow , they were accordingly accepted, and in treated to accepp] that 
Trust. 

D r Leonard Hoar made a resignacon of his Presid t ship of the 
College. 

2: m r Increase Mather being orderly Elected & presented by the 
Presid 1 & Fellows to the Hon d Overseers for their acceptance at a 
former Meeting: He was by an Unanimous Consent intreated to 
accept that Service & trust. 

1 Written over "&." 

2 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written partly in the 
margin. 



232 



COLLEGE BOOK III 



5 1 



at Boston 11. (1) 167J. 



Iohn Leverett Esq 1 " Gov r 

Simon Bradstreet Esq r 

Daniel Gookin Esq 1 " 

Rich d Russel Esq r 

Edwd Tyng Esq r 

W m Stoughton Esq r 

Tho 3 Clarke Esq r 

m r Daniel Gookin) „ „ r , 
mr Pet. Thatcher j FellowM 
m r Iohn Richards Treasur 1 " 
Thomas Danforth. C1.2 



Present 

m r In° Eliot, m r In° Shearma[n] 
m r Tho. Thatcher, m r Incr. Mathe[r] 
m r lames Allin, m r U. Oakes 
m r Tho 8 Shepard, m r Ios. F\yn[t] 



Aprill. 7. 1675. 



Present 

m r John Shermafn] 
m r Tho : Thatch[er] 
m r Tho: Shepard 
m r Josiah fflint 



Jn° Leveret Esq r Gov r 

Cap* Dan: Gookin 

majo r Willard 

m r Ri. Russell 

m r Edw. Ting 

m r Will. Stought(on] 

majo r Clarke 

M r Dan. Gookin 
M r Pet. Thatch r 
M r John Richard[s] 
Tho: Danforth » 



M r Vrian Oakes was desired to give his Answer to a former motion 
of the Overseers to accept of the place of the President of the Colledge 
pro tempore. 

In Answer wherto, he declared a deep sence of his unfitness for the 
work; yet considering the p r sent Exigency the Society was now in, 
& confiding in the Overseers seasonably to endeavo r the settling a fitt 
p r son for y e work, manifesting his willingness to accept of that place 
for a time God enabling by health & strength, & so far as his church 
consented. 



1 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written in the margin. It 
is uncertain to what it refers. 

2 This list of names, in the hand of President Leverett, is written in the 
margin. 

3 A word or letter after Danforth's name is crossed out. The names of those 
present are written in the margin. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1675 233 

The Same Apr 7. 1675. 1 

The Overseers do Order that the Corporacon do take present & 
effectual Care for the Provision of the Stud ts that shal repayre 2 to the 
College: So as may be for the most encouragm* of them. 3 

26. 2. 1675 

At this Corporation meeting w r Present 
m r Oakes Presid* m r Dan. Gookin 

m r Thomas Shepard m r Pet. Thatcher 

m r Incr. Mather m r Iohn Richards Treas 1 " 4 

m r Samuel Danforth was chosen ffellow of the Colledge. 

[68] 

Aprill. 19. 1675 

Present 
m r Oakes Presid* m r Dan: Gookin 

m r Tho. Shepard m r Pet: Thatcher 

m r Jncr. Mather m r John Richards. Trear.B 

According to the order of the ov r seers for settling the Colledge. 
The corporation did 6 choose to the office of a Steward, m r Tho : 
Danforth, the late Steward & the President is requested to desire his 
acceptance of it. 

William Bordman is chosen Cook 

Edward Payson is chosen Butler. 

June 1. 1675. 

Present 
m r Vrian Oakes Pr. m r Dan : Gookin 

m r Tho : Shepard m r Pet : Thatcher * 



1 The words "The Same Apr 7. 1675." are in the hand of President Leverett. 

2 The fifth letter in this word has been altered. 

3 This paragraph is in the hand of President Leverett. 

4 The names of those present and the words "At this Corporation meeting 
w r Present," in the hand of President Leverett, are written in the margin. 

6 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

6 Written over a word crossed out. 

7 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



234 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Order'd, That ^g* 1 Bordman Colledge Smith be payd by the 
Treasurer 20 shill : for mending the Clock : & that he be allowed 12 
shill : per annu for that Service for the future 

That Minot, Allen, Cheev r s, Danforth be schollars of the house for 
the year ensuing, & that Allen be presently payd 5 pounds due of the 
schollarships. 

That m r Webs gift be this year thus distributed To Nathaniel 
Gookin 4 pounds & w fc was due for the last year be p r sently payd him. 
To Andrews 3 pound & y* y e 3 pound due of the Schollarships be 
p r sently payd him. To Emerson 3 pounds & 5 pounds due of the 
Schollarships to be p r sently payd him. To Swetman 3 pounds & 40 
shill due of y e Schollarships to be p r sently payd him. 

Septemb. 8. 1675. 

Thomas Cheev r s chosen monito r . 

Ordered, That the moneys from Pascataqua be payd by the Treas- 
urer, first w* is due to m r Nowell and the remainder to the p r sent 
fellows. 

Overseers Meeting. 2 27. 8. 1675. 3 

m r Vrian Oakes is elected Presid* of Harvard Colledge & by the 
Overseers importuned to accept s d place & trust. 

m r Samuel Danforth being Elected by the Corporation for a ffellow 
of the College, The Overseers manifested their Approbation thereof 
this day. 4 

[69] 

Decern*. 22. 1675. 

Wadsworth was chosen Schollar of y e house 

m r Ammi-Corlett was chosen ffellow of the colledge. 

1 "Aaron," perhaps in a different hand, is written above "Will:" each 
name being underscored, but not crossed out. 

2 The words "Overseers Meeting " are in the hand of President Leverett. 

3 The date was originally written " 27. 8. 75." 

4 This paragraph is in the hand of President Leverett. 



COKPORATION MEETINGS, 1675-1677 235 

Ian* 3 " 1. 1675. m r Ammi-Corlet being Elected by the Corporation 
for a Fellow & presented before the Overseers for their Approbation. 
They manifested their Approbation thereof. 1 

Decern^. 27. 1675. 

m r Daniel Russell was chosen ffellow of the Colledge, and to be 
presented to the overseers for y r accept 2 

11. 2. 1676. 
S r Allen was chosen Library-keeper. 

At a Meeting of the Corporation, 3 22. 6. 1676. 

All the Member thereof being Present i. e 
m r Oakes Presid* m r Ammi Ruhamah Corle[i] 

m r Thomas Shepard m r Iohn Richards, 
m r Incr. Mather Treasurer. 4 

m r Dan. Gookin 

m r Samuel Angier is chosen Probation r 

The Butler is ordered to Ring the Bell at 5 a'clock in the morning 
& 9 aclock at night throughout the yeare 

Octofc. 23. 1677. 
Wadsworth chosen Butler of the Colledge. 

14. 3. 1677. 

Present 
m r Oakes Presid m r Gookin 

m r Shepard m r Corlett. 5 



1 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written partly in the 
margin. 

2 The words "and to be presented to the Overseers for y r accept " are in the 
hand of President Leverett. 

3 The words "At a Meeting of the Corporation," are in the hand of President 
Leverett. 

4 The names of those present and the words "All the Member thereof being 
Present i. e " in the hand of President Leverett, are written in the margin. 

e The names of those present are written in the margin. 



236 COLLEGE BOOK III 

m r John Rogers of Jpswich chosen President of the Colledge, 
nemine contradicente 

James Ailing chosen Schollar of the house 

Thomas Bernard is allowed l 3 pounds for the following year out 
of m r Webs gift 

At a Meeting of the Overseers at Boston. 28 Ian^ 1677. 2 

Present 



Iohn Leverett 


Esq r 


Gov r 


m r Thatcher 


m r Bradstreet 






ra r Allin 


m r Gookin 






m r Mather 


m r Tynge 






m r Flynt 


m r Dudley 






T. D.3 


m r Eliot 









It is Comended by the Overseers to the Corporation that they 
choose another Fellow in the Room and Stead of the Reverend M r 
Shepard dec d . And one to Officiate on the Place if they Judge it 
needfull. 

Turn over and See how the Corporacon understood the above 
Comendation of the Overseers. 4 

[70] 

At a Meeting of the Corporation at Cambridge 5 March. 1. 167| 

All being Present 6 
m r Oakes Presid* m r A. R. Corlet 

- m r Thomaa Shopard m r John Richards 

m r Increase Mather Treasurer. » 

m r Daniel Gookin 



1 The first letter in this word has been altered. 

2 This meeting is in the hand of President Leverett. 

a The names of those present, in the hand of President Leverett, are written 
in the margin. After the initials "T. D./' a letter is blurred or crossed out. 

* This paragraph, in the hand of President Leverett, is written in the lower 
right corner of page [69]. 

* The words "At a Meeting of the Corporation at Cambridge" are in the hand 
of President Leverett. 

8 The words "All being Present" are in the hand of President Leverett. 
7 The names of those present, in the hand of President Leverett, are written 
in the margin. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1678 237 

m r John Sherman Pasto r of the Church at Watertown chosen . At this Meet- 
ing Mr Isaac 

ffellow of the Colledge, & member of the Corporation, All Consenting. JJ^ e J p ™ b a a s 
And the Presid* was desired to present him to y e Overseers in order ^ on car e an of * the 
to their Approbation. 1 3SSJ££SS% 

Ordered, That Goodman Brown have for his Service in the Colledge, &SS> Brattle ' & 
two shill. per quarter from ev r y Schollar particularly, that holds a ^J^f^tnis 
Study in the Colledge. ™ ai whom 

Percivall Green is allowed 3 pounds out of m r Webs gift for the ^ooseTomc^ 

£ 11 ™.:~~ , T ^«-~ ate on the Place, 

tOllOWmg year besides the Revd 

Samuel Mitchell shall have 6 pounds of the Scholarships y* re- now "chosen ma a 

Non-Residt Fel- 

mame vacant. low of the coi- 

1©£?6 ^ £1X1(1 Stem- 

Russell sen r is chosen Schollar of the house for y e yeare following, ber of the cor- 

« / » ° iioration.4 



The Jnventory at. pag. 55 5 was calld ov r . 
May. 21. 1678. 

Present 
The Gov r m r Elliot 

m r Bradstreet m r Shearman 

m r Gookin m r Thatcher 

m r Ting m r Allen 

m r Dudley Tho: Danforth Cl.« 

m r Oakes was desired to contine 7 his care ov r the Colledge & to 
officiate in the place of President at the next Commencem* 

M r Sherman was now presented to & approv'd by y e Overseers. 
In w ch place he continued to his death, w ch happen'd Aug. 8, 1685. 8 

m r 9 Jsaac ffoster was installed ffellow of y e Colledge. 

Samuel Gibson was called before the ov r seers & solemnly cautioned 
of entertaining any of the Students in his house, frequenting the Col- 
ledge or drawing them otherwise into his company. 

1 The words beginning with "All" and ending with "Approbation" are in 
the hand of President Leverett. 

2 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. The last six 
words are underscored. 

3 The words "of the College" are interlined. 

4 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 

6 The reference is to page [66] of the text, or pages 230-231 of this volume. 

6 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

7 The last letter in this word has been altered. 

8 The words beginning with "M r Sherman" and ending with "1685" are in 
the hand of President Leverett. 

8 A word before "m r " is crossed out. 



poration.' 



238 COLLEGE BOOK III 

The Students are cautioned not to frequent the houses of Samuel 
Green 1 jun r & the abovnamd Sam 1 Gibson. 

June. 30. 1679. 

Voted, That the Wor a M r Stoughton be desired to provide a Presid fc 
for the colledge, & the ov r seers consenting, the Rev* 1 m r Oakes is 
desired to write to m r Stoughton in the name of the Corporation 

M r Daniel Gookin is chosen Library keep r 

[71] 

Boston. July. 3. 1679 

emo j n the Ordered, that m r Penoyrs Donation of 34 pound per annum, mony 
hjTpaHwra! °^ England, given to 2 fellows & 2 Schollars be disposed of as follow- 
j}%p£° eth. viz. from Apr. 1. 78. to Aprill. 1. 1679. To m r Gookin & m r 
•°HaTCn""of ffoster p r sent fTellows 10 pound a peice & to James Ailing & noadiah 
the coionie Russell, both schollars of the colonie of nox 7 or new haven, 7 pound to 
d n. Haven each. And that what is due from m r Penoyrs Legacy before Apr. 1. 
1678. viz. 10 a w n received be given to m r Corlett. 

Octofi. 8. 1679. 

Present 
m r Oakes Presid* m r Gookin 

m r Mather m r ffoster. s 

m r Richards 

m r Samuel Andrew was chosen ffellow of Harvard Colledge, 
nemine contradicente. 

The Treasurer is impowred to take care of the Donation of S r 
Matthew Holworthy, to gett it over 9 into the Country, as soon as 
may be 

1 Originally written "Gibson," then altered to "Green." 

2 The word "Mr" is interlined. 

3 The word "Will" is interlined. 

4 Some words are here crossed out. 
6 The word "now" is interlined. 

6 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Holyoke. The last eight 
words are underscored. 

7 The words " colonie of nox " are underscored, 
s The names of those present are written in the margin. 
9 The first two letters in this word have been altered. 



ny 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1679-1680 239 

Five pounds of m r Penoyrs gift due from Apr. 1. to Octob. 1. 79. 
is given to m r Jsaac ffoster. 

The Colledge Laundress is allowed 40 shill. p annm for washing 
the Colledge Linnen. 

Russell sen r was chosen Butler of the Colledge 

ffeb. 2. 1 1679. 

m r Oakes chosen President of Harvard Colledge. 

m r John Richards is ordered to treat with the Exec r s of mr Joseph 
Brown decead, about his Legacy to the Colledge, & receive the same 
to best advantage, & the Rev d m r Jncrease Mather is desired to 
assist him herein. 

The Treasurer is ordered to pay m is Belchar for the wine expended 
at the ffunerall of m r Ammi-Ruhamah Corlett. 

S r Bernard & s r Mitchell be chosen Schollars of the house for one 
whole year. 

[72] 

Thomas Andrews & John Wythe chosen Colledge Servants, one 
to serve in the place of a Bricklayer the other in place of a plasterer. 

Ordered, that the Treasurer pay Aaron Bordman 20 shill p annum 
for keeping y e clock in repayr 

ffebr. 9. 1679. ■ 

The Overseers approvd of the choice of the Rev d m r Vrian Oakes, 
to the office of President in the Colledge. & request the wor H William 
Stoughton Joseph Dudley & Peter Bulkely Esq r s & the Rev 4 m r 
John Eliott & m r Jncrease Mather, 2 to p r sent their desires to m r 
Oakes & the Church at Cambridge, for his acceptance of s d trust & 
their concurrane therin. 

The Rev d m r Urian Oakes was Installed Presid* of Harvard Col- 
lege 3 by Govern. Bradstreet in the College-Hall on the Comencm 1 - 
day. August 1680. 4 

1 Before "2" a figure is crossed out. 

2 The first letter in this word has been altered. 

8 The words "Presid* of Harvard College" are interlined. 
4 This paragraph is in the hand of President Leverett. 



240 COLLEGE BOOK III 

25. 5. 1681. 
The Rev d m r Vrian Oakes, President of Harvard Colledge, dyed. 

26 5 1681 * 

ffor the mannagem* of the Commencem* now shortly to be at- 
tended It is ordered, y* the Gov r m t of the day & work be by the 
fellowes of the Colledge in manner following 

The Rev d m r [ ] is to begin the day with prayer & give the 
Comenc r s their degrees. 

The Rev 41 m r [ ] is to moderate y e dispute [ ] the worke 
of the day with prayer. 

] of the Batchelours. 

Jts further orderd, that the fellowes of the Colledge take care thereof 
in all respects, as well for admission of students as Govenm* & in- 
struction till a President be orderly settled. 

At a Meeting of the Overseers at Cambridge 26. 5. 1681. 2 

For the Managm* of the Comencm* now shortly to be attended. 
It is Order 'd, That the Governm 1 of the day & work shalbe by the 
Fellows of the College, in manner following, 

The Rev d m r John Sherman is requested to begin the Work of the 
day with prayer. And is Impowered to give unto the Comencers 
their Degrees. 

The Rev 4 m r Incr. Mather is requested [t]o Moderate the Dispute 
of the Masters, [a]nd to Conclud the work of the day with prayer. 

m r Daniel Gookin [i]s desired to Moderate the Dispute [o]f the 
Bacchelours and to be in all other respects assisting as as there 
shalbe occasion. 

Also for the Carrying on the present Work of the College untill that 
a Presid* be orderly nominated and Settled, It is Order'd, That the 
Fellows of the s d College take the care there of in all respects, as well 
for the Entrance of Stud ts , as their Governm* and Instructions. 



1 This entire entry is in the original crossed out, some words not being legible. 

2 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written chiefly in the margin, 
and is intended to displace the preceding entry, crossed out. 



f5> 

.c 



/f* 


i 


1 


4 


\ 


4 


4 


€ 


£ v*^ 


^ 


vS / 


>y 


^ / 


i- 


@\sj 




EXCESSES AT COMMENCEMENT, 1681 241 

[73] 

At a Meeting of the Overseers at Boston. 28. 5. 1681. 1 

The Overseers being inform'd That the Rev d m' John Sherman 
by reason of the Infirmitys attending his Age, may not be capable of 
attending the Work of the Comencm* as was lately Order'd do Judge 
meet to revise their former Vote, and do hereby Order and Impower 
the Rev d m r Increase Mather to carry on the Work and Service of 
the next Comencm 1 , and to give the Comencers their Degrees, due 
resp ct 2 being had to the gficiency 3 & duty required of the Comencers 
by the Law of y e College for the Obtaining the same. And m r Daniel 
Gookin jun r is desired & order'd to be helpfull in Moderating the 
Disputes of the Bacchel rs 

28. 5. 1681 * 

The Overseers being informed, that the Rev 11 m r John Sherman 
may not be capeable, through age, of attending the work of the Com- 
encem 1 , they thereby impower the Rev d m r Jncrease Mather to carry 
on the work thereof & give the Commenc r s their degrees. And m r 
Daniell Gookin jun r is desired to be helpfull in moderating the dis- 
putes of the Batchel r s 

Jts ordered That no Graduate henceforth shall provide more then For the Pr< 

. <->, , venting of ti 

3 gallons of wine, nor oth r Students more then one for comencm*. growing bxc« 

& ' in Wine at Con 

m r Samuel Andrew is appoynted to execute the office of a Procto r ^ cmts5 
for the comencm* week And in speciall, to take care that the Students 
Chambers and Studyes be cleared of all manner of p r sons during the 
time of publick exercise on comencem* day. & at or before 9 a clock 
at night to cause all strangers to depart from the Colledge, & to sig- 
nifye to them that y e usuall recourse of any to the Colledge the follow- 
ing days of the week, excepting Schollars is displeasing to the hon d & 
Rev d Overseers, & that they are required accordingly to forbeare. 

1 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written partly in the mar- 
gin, and is intended to displace the heading and first paragraph of the follow- 
ing entry, crossed out. 

2 Above this word is written in pencil "respect." 

3 Above the first letter in this word is written in pencil " pro." 

4 This heading, and the first paragraph of the entry, are crossed out in the 
original. 

5 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Leverett. 



242 COLLEGE BOOK III 

And in case Students or other p r sons not belonging to the Colledge 
shall refuse to submitt themselvs to this order, Jts required of m r 
Andrews y 1 he returne their names to the Overseers who will proceed 
ag* them according to y e demeritt of their offence. Also the Procto r 
is required to take speciall care y* the provisions to be sent in to the 
College Hall be accordingly p r formed. And all the abuses y t have 
been of y l kind formerly to be effectually p r vented for the future. 

12:5. mo. 1 1681. 

Present 
m r Oakes pres dt m r Mather 

Capt. Richards Trea m r Andrew 2 

m r Shearman 

Danforth & Walter are chosen schollars of the house, their Schol- 
arships to begin from last comencem^ 3 

out of m r Webs gift. 6 ft for y e following yeare is given to Webb & 
4 a of s d gift unto Tompson. 

The Trear to dispose of the money from England. 



[74] 

Anno. 1681. 6. 9. mo 4 

m r John Cotton was unanimously chosen ffellow of the Colledge. 
Ordered, that the hon d m r Thomas Danforth be desired to look 
after the repayring of the College Edifices 

Boston. Anno. 1681. 

The Rev 41 m r Jncrease 5 Mather was chosen Presid* of Harvard 
Colledge in Cambridge. 

Nov. 7. 1681 

Present 
Cap 1 Richards m r Andrew 

m r Mather m r Cotton 8 






1 The letter " o" in this word has been altered. 

2 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

3 A word, apparently "Anno," is here crossed out. 
* Above " 6. 9." is written in pencil "Aug. 9." 

6 The last letter in this word has been altered. 

« The names of those present are written in the margin. 



SAMUEL TORREY ELECTED PRESIDENT, 1681-82 243 

m r John Cotton was chosen Library keeper 

Dudley was chosen Schollar of the house 

The wor H Cap* John Richards & the Rev 4 m r Jncrease Mather are 
desired with Speed to receive of John Scarlet, Executo r of Capt. 
Samuel Scarlett the mony due to the Colledge by Legacy or annuity 
of s d Cap*. Scarlett; & upon refusall to prosecute according to Law 

Decemfc. 13. 1681. 

Present 
Cap* Richards 

fMather 
m r -J Andrew 

[Cotton i 

m r nehemiah Hubbard was chosen 2 by the Corporation unani- 
mously, to be ffellow of the Colledge 

The Treasurer is impowred, by Letter of Attorney to impowre 
somebody to receive w* is due on account of m r Penoyrs & m r Dood- 
eridges gifts, & to give discharges upon receipt thereof. 



January. 5. 1681 

Present 
Capt. Richards 

{Mather 
Hobart 
Andrew 
Cotton.3 

The Rev* 1 m r Samuel Torrey Pasto r of the Church in Weymouth 
was unanimously chosen ffellow of President of Harvard Colledge. 
Cotton is chosen Schollar of the house. 
Whiting is ordered to receive 3 4 pound of m r Webs gift 



1 The names of those present, in the hand of President Leverett, are written 
in the margin. 

2 Apparently altered from *i chosens." 

3 The names of those present, in the hand of President Leverett, are written 
in the margin. 

4 This figure has been altered. 



244 COLLEGE BOOK III 

[75] 

March. 27. 1682. 

Present 
Cap* Richards 
' Mather 
Hobart 
Andrew 
Cotton ! 

Ordered, That what is due from the Re^ m r Seaborn Cotton, on 
acco* of detrim ts or halfe tuition for his Son m r John Cotton shall be 
remitted. 

That what remained due from m r Richard Russell for Schollarships 
before his decease, supposed to be about 10 pound be allowed to S r 
Mitchell 

That w* is due from the Rev* 1 m r Jncrease mather for detrim ts or 
halfe tuition of his son Cotton Mather be rebated. 

Whereas great complaints have been made against Web for his 
abusive carriages, in requiring some ffreshmen to go upon his 
private Errands, in striking them ; & in 2 scandalous negligence of 
those Dutyes he is bound to attend by Colledge Law; & having per- 
sisted obstinately in his evills, notwithstanding means used to re- 
claime him ; & not attending the Corporation this day, w n required ; 
he is sentenced, ffirst to be deprived of the pension formerly allowed 
him, and also to be expelled the Colledge: and in case he p r sume 
after the Space of 24 hours to appear within the Colledge W r alls, then 
the fellows are to cause him to be 3 carry ed before civill authority. 

Apr. 10. 1682. 

Present 
Cap 1 Richards. Es[g] m r Andrew 

m r Mather m r Cotton 4 

m r Hobert 






1 The names of those present, in the hand of President Leverett, are written 
in the margin. 

2 Substituted for "for," crossed out. 

3 The last letter in this word has been altered. 

4 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



ACCOUNT OF THE COLLEGE ESTATE, 1682 245 

Jnp r s. m r John Rogers was chosen President of Harvard Colledge. 

Whereas the Wor H Cap* John Richards is going for England, he 
is desired to leave the Acco ts of & Papers concerning the Colledge 
Stock in the hands of the hon d Thomas Danforth, Dep* Gov r , 'till 
his returne from England or 'till anoth 1 " be chosen. 

Ordered by the Corporation, That the Resident fellows m r Samuel 
Andrew & m r John Cotton shall (on consideration of their care & 
pains) be allowed each of them 50 11 in mony out of the Colledge 
Revenue, for the p r sent year ending at Comencem* that is to say, so 
much shall be added to their p r sent salary as to make it up fifty pound 
to each for this year 

[76] 

Colledge Estate delivered by the Wor H Cap* John Richards unto 
the Dep* Gov r is as followeth: in the Acco* underwritten. 

Account of the Estate belonging to Harvard Colledge under my management. 
Due from the severall p r sons undermentioned, namely. 

Jntrest Principall 

4Qttin 08 (ff rom mr ffrancis Willoughby's Exe r s. by obligacon. 

I dated January. 24. 1668 200 00 00 

19 no on {From m r Joseph Jewets Ex r s. Ipswich, p oblige, dat. 

u uy uu i Apr 23 6Q 060*00 00 

no to aa i {ffrom K* Grant, watertown p obligac. dat. nov. 28. 

03 16 00 i j 1664 010 00 00 

From Jn° Bernard Watertowne. p oblig. dat. Apr. 17. 

1667 003 10 00 

01 18 06 From Hen. Green Boston, p oblig. dat. May. 4. 1667 005 00 00 

67 14 02 i 

From L* Josh Fishers Ex r s. Dedham. p oblig. dat. may. 29. 1669 . . 017 00 00 

Jntrest as p Margent 067 14 02J 

From m r Ed : Tings Ex r s. Boston, p note. dat. may. 20. 1669 ... 005 00 00 

From Tho: Hawkins Ex r s. Boston p bill. dat. Sep* 20. 1661 ... 022 00 00 

From Tho: Brown Cambr. p bill. dat. March. 1. 1664. rest .... 010 04 06 
From m r Seth Perry rest 2 due for rent of house in Boston March. 

25. 1682 3 025 00 00 

From Rob 1 Jngolls & Rob* Burgess rest due for rent of meadow to 

March. 1. 1675 * 003 00 00 

1 This figure has perhaps been altered. 

2 Altered from "rent." 

3 Altered from "1662." 

* This date has apparently been altered. 



246 COLLEGE BOOK III 

From ditto Burgess & Jngolls & Ri. Hood of Lyn. new lease of m r 

Coggans meadow w ch they take at 8 H p ann. for 7 yeare from. ffeb. 

27. 1675 (of w ch I reed. 8 H 10 s ) rest due. 27. 12. 81 040 00 00 

From the Exe r s of Ri : * Russell Esq r (for w ch they pay 15 H p annu) 162 16 04 
From s d Exec r s. 100 ft given by m r Russells will of w ch receiv d . 

31 11 13. 04 d rest due 068 062 08 

From the Exe r s. of m r Joseph Brown a Legacy 100 00 00 

From m r John Scarlett, he was to pay of Cap 1 Scarletts Annuity. 

28 a (1 rec d 10 H ) rest 018 00 00 

From the Bendalls (Cap 1 Scarlets Legacy) due Jan. 1. 81. for 1 year 

money 007 00 00 

From m r Newgates ffarme due march. 25. 1682 005 00 00 

26f bush, of malt in Golden Moores hand and 25 in m r Lyndes hand 

& 10 bush. Ben Eaton 012 00 00 

Ballance of my Acco* 007 06 00 



848 17 8i 

[77] 

Moneys Lett out. Anno. 1681. at 8 p C. p annu. 

Aug. 1881 

15 To m r Sam: Goff of Cambr. p bond for 1 year ... 015 00 00 

18 To m r Jn° Nevison Watertown p oblig. 4 yeare . . 050 00 00 

19 To W m Veazy & Cap* Jn<> Holbrook Weymouth, p 

bond. 1. year 040 00 00 

19 To Sam: Paine & s d Holbrook. p bond. 1. yeare . . 020 00 00 

20 To Rob* & Benj. Badcock Milton, p bond. 3 year. 030 00 00 
23 To Elias Parkman of Boston marrin r p morg. 3 year 125 00 00 

Sep* 7 To m r William Goodhue. Jpswich. p bond. 1 yeare . 040 00 00 

15 To Tho : Plimly & Cap* Nicho. Page. Boston, p bond. 

3 yeare 025 00 00 

15 To m r Edw d Pelham & m r Sam. Goff. Cambr p bond. 

1 yeare 030 00 00 

20 To Jn° Aulger of Boston, p mortg 3 year 030 00 00 

21 To Tho: Atkins of Boston carpent r p mortg. 3 year 025 00 00 
27 To m r Leonard Dowden Merch* Boston, p mortg. 

1 year 050 00 00 

October 

8 To Rob* Billings Sen r &c. Dorchest 1 ". p bond. 3 

year 270 00 00 

17 To James Pemb r ton & Jo : Pemb r ton. Boston, p bond. 

1 year 025 00 00 

17 To m r Pet. Sergeant to pay Jntrest from 1 st Jns* 

Nov*" note 100 00 00 

27 To Esther Keene & Eleazer Holyoke. Boston, p bond. 

1 yeer 030 00 00 

1 Written over another word. 

2 Apparently altered from " 16." 



JOSEPH WEBB READMITTED, 1682 247 

Nov. 2 To James Tisdall of Charlst Taunton & D r Avery 

Boston. Bond 010 00 00 

Dec. 15 To Tho:&Ephr. Hunt &c.p bond ........ 1000000 

1682 m r Sam* Nowell p bond. Apr. 6. 1 year ...... 050 00 00 

To Jn° Matson of Dorchester (includ in a morg. for 
a g 11 sum to mee) for 2 yeer. comencing June. 4. 
1681 (W m Stoughton Esq r hath the mortgage) . 128 00 00 



1193 00 00 

To a Donation from Cap* John Hull 100 00 00 

Cont d on the other side 848 17 8£ 



2141 17 8£ 



A Deed of m r Jn° Coggans meadow lett to Jngolls and Burgess &c. 

now at 8 s p an 

Deed of Annuity of m r Newgates-Rumney marsh 5 pan 

Lease of house to m r Seth Perry Boston 10 p an 

Lease of house to m r Enoch Greenleafe : Boston 13 p an 

Legacy of M r Jon Glov r s (all p d to ffebr. 10. 1681) 5 p an 

Lease of Charlstown fferry (All p d to ffebr. 1. 1681) 50 p an 

Legacy from y e late Cap* Sam 1 Scarlett, (see his will) enquire of M r 

Jncrease Mather 7 * p an 

Deed of Bumkin Jsland from m r Sam 1 Ward of Charlstowne. 
Deed of Land bought of m r John Betts at Cambr. 
A grant of a ffarme at Pacotoqj in Pequott. Country. 
Aprill. 10. 1682. p me 

John Richards. 

[78] 

May. 4. 1682 

Present 
Capt Richards 

I Mather 
Hubbard 
Andrew 
Cotton 2 

The Petition of Joseph Web 3 formerly expelled the Colledge, being 
p r sented to & considered of by the Corporation, they consent that he 
shall be readmitted into the Colledge on his good behaviour being 
publikely 4 read in the Hall, & by him publickly acknowledged. 



1 Under this figure is written in pencil "98." 

2 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

3 The name "Web" is interlined. 

4 Altered from "publiquely." 



248 COLLEGE BOOK III 

At a Corporation meeting. 

Ordered that the double Books in the Colledge Library be prized 
& sold & y e mony improved for the buying other books y l are wanting. 

Jan. 10. 168|. 

Present 
m r Rogers. Pres dt m r Andrew 

m r Hobert m r Cotton 1 

Ordered, that the Wor a Cap* John Richards Esq r be impowred 
as Attorney in behalfe of y e Corporation to call in & receive moneys 
due as arrears from the gift of M r William Penoyer or 2 oth r s, & upon 
receipt to give full discharge & acquittance 

The Wor 11 Samuel nowell Esq r was chosen Trear of Harvard Col- 
ledge, Liberty being reserved for the Wor tt Jn° Richards Esq r to 
reassume the place at his returne. 

March. 22. 168| 

Present 
m r Mather m r Andrew 

m r Hobert m r Cotton » 

Ordered, That the Treasurer of the Colledge do of the next mony 
belonging to the Colledge w ch shall be by him received pay to the 
fellows upon the place, 4 what yet remains as due to them by Vote of 
y e Corporation, dated Apr. 10. 168f 

[79] 

Ordered, That Elliot, Whiting, Mills, Phillips shall for the next 
year be allowed five pounds out of the Colledge Revennue. the time 
to begin at 28 of this instant March. 

An Jnventory of the Colledge Vtensills belonging to the 
Buttery octob. 26. 1683. 

Silver. 2 Salt Sellars. 1. great one. 1 little one 
1. earthen Jug tippd with silver. 



1 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

2 Written over " &." 

3 The names of those present are written in the margin. 

4 Perhaps " places." 



ACCOUNT OF COLLEGE STOCK, 1682-83 



249 



1. Bowl. 2 Beaker, one markd I B, th' other W W. 
1. Silver Tankard marked S P. 

2 Silver Spoons. 1. Goblett the gift of m r Edward Paige 
ffellow Comoner. 

1. Goblett given by m r ffrancis Wainwright ffellow Comoner. 

Pewter. 4. fflaggons, serviceable, 2. two quart potts with lids good. 
2 two quart pots without lids, battred. 1 3 pint pott 
without a lid. 1. Tankard unfitt for service. 2. new 
Juggs with lidds. 4 other Juggs one with a lid & 2 
without. 4. old Juggs unserviceable, 

3 Sizepots, 2 with lids, new. the other without 4 new salt 
sellars. 2 old battred salt sellars 4 small cups new. 3. 
Bowls battred. 4 cups with eares unserviceable. 2 
cuecups one unserviceable. 

Brass, ffour brass candlesticks. 

Linnen. Comencm* Linnen. 5 Diap r tablecloaths. 3 long ones. 
2 small square ones. 
7. Doz : & 4 diap r napkins. 

2 long Towells new. 1 old Towell unserviceable. 

comon Linnen. 3. ffellows Tablecloaths new. 3 new 
Table cloaths for y e lower Table. 3 old Tablecloaths. 
almost worn out. 

Wood. 1. Table. 4. canns 2 new. 2 old. 

12 doz : Trench r s. 6 cups, 4 beer barrells 

3 Tables to put names on 1 great desk, 1 salt box. 

Jn the Hall. 3. Tables. 6 forms 1 Chair. 3. Desks. 
1 Curtain to one window. 1 small buttery Mulctbook 



[80] 

An Acco* of the Colledge Stock betrusted by Cap* Jn° Richards 
Esq r hf with Thomas Danforth Esq r . 



1682 
Apr. 20 
May. 6 
July. 19 



Harvard Colledge Stock. D r . 

To David Mead p Bill for 1 year at 8 p C 007 00 00 

To Aaron Bordman by order of the ffellowes .... 002 04 10 

To m r Manning p d portage of Books 000 09 00 



250 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Ditto. 31° To the Butlar for Trench r s 000 12 00 

To m r Addington for entring writings 000 05 00 

To Christoph r Read i p Bill for 7 years at 8 p C begin- 
ning September. 30 th 1682 050 00 00 

To cash payd for boards for Colledge use & charges as 

particulars on file 010 17 00 

To 6 Scholarships at 5 H ending. Aug. 8. 82 030 00 00 

To disbursem t3 at Sundry times referring to Coll. 

Woodhouse 011 14 03 

To James Trowbridge & John Mirick per bill dat. 8. 

8. 82. at 8 p C. for 4 years 046 12 00 

To Hen. Seager p bill. dat. 10. Jan. 82 020 00 00 

To Christopher Grants Bill 001 15 06 

181 09 07 

[81] 

Harvard Colledge Stock C r 
1682 

June. By Cash received of Cap 1 Richards 007 06 00 

By Richard Hood of Lyn. Arrears of Rent for Marsh 002 00 00 

By Malt p 10 bush, of Beno. Eaton 002 00 00 

July. 25 By Richard Hood abovs d in money 001 00 00 

8^ . 9 By Hester Keane Jntrest 002 08 00 

14 By James Pemberton principall & Jntrest 027 00 00 

20 By Mercy Dowdon principall & Jntrest 054 00 00 

gi**. 6 By Malt of m r Jos. Lynds 3H bush. 31 004 14 06 

By old Timber 000 03 00 

By Ditto 001 02 00 

By money received of Deacon Coop 1 " 000 17 06 

X^.IS By Samuel Payne p Jntrest 001 12 00 

By Roger Billings 046 12 00 

20 By D r Avery principall & Jntrest 010 16 00 

11. 10 By Jno Man p Jntrest 012 00 00 

12 . 6 By Will. Veasy Jntrest money 003 04 00 

176 15 00 
Rest due to Ballance this Acco 1 to Tho. Danfor Esq 1 " 

March. 5. 168f 004 14 07 

181 09 07 
5.1 .168$ A true Acco* Errors excepted 
Tho: Danforth 

Cam*. 5. 1. 1681 

The Acco tfl of the Colledge Bills & estate betrusted w th the 
above named Thomas Danforth Esq 1 " by Cap 1 John Richards Trear. 

i The third letter in this name has been altered. 






^Mfs 



r* 




-4 



'_ ».. ■ ■ ■ • ■ 



ACCOUNT OF COLLEGE ESTATE, 1683 



251 



of the College, having been perused & examined by the Corporaccon, 
the day & yeare above written, this aboves d Acco* thereof is 
allowed by us. and the bills & Evidences of s d moneys & Estate by 
o r order are by s d Thoma Danforth Esq r delivered into the hands 
of Samuel Nowell Esq r 

Jn° Rogers 

Increase Mather 

Nehemiah Hobart 

Samuel Andrew 

John Cotton 

[82] 



March. 5 th - An Acco* of the Estate belonging to Harvard 

1683 : Colledge under the Care of Sam 1 Nowell 1 

Esq r . delivr d unto him by Thomas 
Danforth. Esq r is as followeth. 

Jntrest due at 
End of y r years 
respectively. 

Jn moneys due by Bond and Bill &ca. 
H sh dd 

63.00.00 ffrancis Willoughbyes Ex r s. p Bill. dat. 24.11.68 . . . 200 00 00 

17.05.00 Joseph Juitts Exec r s. p Bill. dat. 23.2.1660 .... 0600000 

02.06.06 Hen. Green of Boston p Bill. dat. 4.3.1667 005 00 00 

01.04.00 Sam 1 Goffep Bond. dat. 15.6.1681 0150000 

04.00.00 Jn° Nevinson p Bond. dat. 18.6.1681 050 00 00 

W m Veazy & Cap* Holbrook p bond. 19.6.1681 ... 040 00 00 

Sam 1 Payne & Cap* Holbrookp bond. 19.6.81 . . . 020 00 00 

02.08.00 Rob* & Benj.Badcockpbond.dat. 20.6.81 030 00 00 

10.00.00 Elyas Parkman p mortgage, dat. 23.6.81 125 00 00 

03.04.00 W m Goodhue p bond, dat 7.7.81 040 00 00 

02.00.00 Tho: Plimble & Cap 1 Nich. Page. dat. 15.7.81 . . . 025 00 00 

02 . 08 . 00 m r Edw d Pelham & Sam 1 Goff p bond. 7.7.81 ... 030 00 00 

02.08.00 Jn° Angur of Boston p mortgage. 20.7.81 030 00 00 

02.00.00 Tho: Atkins 2 of Boston p mortgage. 21.7.81 .... 0250000 

Roger. Billins Sen r Dorchester p bond. 8.8.81. rest . 245 00 00 

08.00.00 m r Peter Seargeant p note. 1.8.81 100 00 00 

Hester Kane & Eleazer Hollinck Boston p bill. 27.8.81 030 00 00 

08.00.00 Ephr. & Tho: Hunt p bond. 15.10.81 100 00 00 

04.00.00 m r Sam 1 Nowell Esq r p bond. 10.2.82 ....... 0500000 



1 "Sam 1 Nowell" is written over "Thomas Danforth." 

2 The letter "n" in "Atkins" is written over a letter undecipherable. 



252 COLLEGE BOOK III 

10.04.02 Jn° Mason of Dorchester included in a mortgage in m r 

Stoughtons hand. June. 4.81 128 00 00 

Jn° Man of Boston p mortgage at 6 l p C 100 00 00 

L* 2 James Trowbridge. Jno Miricke bond, 8.8.82 . . 046 12 00 

K*. Read of Cambr. by bond, dat, 21.8.82 050 00 00 

Hen. Seager of Muddy River, dat. 10.11.82 .... 0200000 

K*. Grant Sen r p bill dat. Jan. 20.82 016 14 00 

00.11.08 David Mead of Billerica dat. 10.12.82 019 00 00 

The Country Trear D r for w ctl annualy they pay 15* in 

Country pay 162 16 04 



142.19.04 1763 02 04 

[83] 

Jn moneys behind for Rent, Jntrest Legacyes &c a . as followeth. 

John Barnard of Watertowne p bill. 17.2.1667 003 10 00 

Exec^ofL* Josh: ffisherp note. dat. 20.3.1669 017 00 00 

Edw d Ting Esq r sExe r s. p note. dat. 20.3.1669 005 00 00 

Exec r sofTho: Hawkins p bill. dat. 20.7.1661 022 00 00 

Tho: Brown of Cambr. p note. dat. 1.1.1664 010 04 06 

SethPerryforRentbehind.dat. 25.1.1683 035 00 00 

Rob* Jngolls & Rob* Burgess. Lyn. rest due for rent. 1682 .... 049 00 00 
The Country Trear hath in Stock of the Colledges 162 a 16 s 4 d for w ch 

they pay in Country pay annually (due for 82) 015 00 00 

Ex r s. of Richard Russell Esq r behind for a legacy 068 06 08 

Ex r s of m r Joseph Brown 100 00 00 

m r Jn° Scarletts, part of Cap 1 Scarletts annuity 018 00 00 

Bendalls Children for Cap 1 Scarletts Legacy, for 1681. 1682. begin- 
ning January. 1. 1680 014 00 00 

m r Newgates farme. 1681. 1682 010 00 00 

Jn Benoni Eatons hand 31£ malt. 31 p bush 004 14 06' 

Malt. 26f bush in Golden Moores hands 003 19 10 

By order of m r Jn° Russell of (of Dan 1 Hovey « 012 10 06 

Hadly to receive ( of Country Trear 006 18 06 

Bill signed by Bridget Peirce 021 00 00 

Legacy of Deacon Trusedall. Exc r s of W m Gilbert 040 00 00 

By Jntrest as on the left page money 142 19 04 

Tot 594 09 04 

Brought from y e left page . . . 1763 02 04 

2357 11 08 



1 Apparently altered from "8." 

2 The letter "L" in this word is written over 

3 These figures have been altered. 
* Perhaps " Hordy." 



SCHOLARS OF THE HOUSE, 1683 253 

Jn lands, houses, Annuityes &c a 

Jn Rumney Marsh. 70 ac r s. Meadow at. 8 1 p annum 008 00 00 

m r Newgates Annuity. 5 l p annum 005 00 00 

House that was Cap* Keynes rented at. 10 a p anu 010 00 00 

m r Webs house rented at 13 11 p annum 013 00 00 

Legacy payd out of m r Jn° Glovers Estate. 5 1 p annum 005 00 00 

Charlstown fferry lett at. 50 a per annum 050 00 00 

[84] 

Cap 1 Scarletts legacy. 7 l p annum 007 00 00 

Bumkin Jsland m r wards legacy p ann 002 00 00 

About 20 acc r s land in Watertown. Haywards gift at 002 00 00 



Lands in Cambr. 
Town bounds 



102 10 00 

In the neck of land. 3 ac r s f 
on S. Side river woodland. 6 ac r s 
40 Ac r s Elder Chamneys gift 
30 ac r s granted, by y e Town 
10 ac r s wood lotts. at Spie pond 



A farme at 1 Billerica. 200 ac r s. 

1751 1 moneys at Jntrest. as above at 8* p C. is 140 00 00 

242 10 00 



Totall. 



11 s d 
Jn Stock upon Emprovem* 2357 11 08 



Jn Annuityes, Rents &c p anh. 242 10 00 

Aug. 12. 1683. 

m r John Rogers was solemnly inaugurated into the place of 
President. 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Cambridge. December. 5. 1683 

Present 

m r Rogers presid* m r Hobert 

m r Sherman m r Andrew 

m r Mather m r Cotton 2 

Nehemiah Walter was chosen Butler 

Orderd that the Schollars of the house for the year ensuing be S r 
Mitchell, S r Danforth, Denison, Saitonstall, Dudley & Cotton 



1 A word is here crossed out, probably " ac r s." 

2 The names of those present are written in the margin. 



254 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Orderd, That upon consideration of the great pains which the 
present ffellows resident in the Colledge (viz fc m r Andrew & m r Cotton) 
have taken, theyr allowance for the year past beginning at Comencem* 
1682 shall be 45 1 in money to each of them. And that what the 
Jncome from the fferry at Charlstowne & m r Glovers gift doth come 
short of this sum shall be made up out of the money received in Eng- 
land by the hon d Treasurer of the Colledge Majo r Richards 

[85] 

John Palfrey was chosen Colledge-Joyner 

Ordered, That the Butler shall on account of his drawing of Cyder 
have 18 d y e Barrell allowed to him. 

Jt was voted and agreed vnanimously by the corporation that the 
president be desired to speake to the Gov r to intreat y l the Overseers 
would please to order the Commencem* for the future to be on the 
first Wednesday in July. 

At a meeting of the Overseers at Boston January. 3. 1683. 

The Overseers being acquainted with the Vote of the Corporation 
for the change of the Comencem* day from the time wherin 't was 
last held to the first Wednesday in July, Do consent y 1 it be upon s d 
day for the future. 1 

At a Meeting of the Corporation in Cambridge March 17. 1683. 4. 2 

Present 

M r Rogers Presid* 
(Capt. Richards ) 
( M r Nowel j 

M r Sherman 

M r Mather, M r Hobart 

M r Andrew, M r Cotton 

Voted, 

That out of m r Penoy rs gift be given to Chauncey £10, and £7.10* 
to Davenport. 

That Eliot, Whiting, Mills & Phillips shal have each of them for 
the next year £5 in money given them, this Vote to begin fro Mar. 26. 
1684. 



i Treasurer Danforth's hand ends here. 

s This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written chiefly in the margin. 



ACCOUNT OF COLLEGE STOCK, 1693 



255 



At 1 a Meeting of the Overseers on the Commencm* day Canrbr. 
July. 1. 1684. Pres* Simon Bradstreet Govern r Dan. Gookin, Will m 
Stoughton, Maj r Bulkley, Maj r Saltonstall, Huphrey Davy, John 
Richards, James Rusell, W m Johnson, Sam 1 Sewal, Esq". m r John 
Eliot, m r James Allin, m r Sam 1 Willard, m r Tho : Shepard. 

Wheras p a sudden visitation by Sickn. the Present Presid* is dis- 
abled from Officiating in carrieing on the Comencm*; The Over- 
seers of the College have Nominated, appointed & Order'd the Rever d 
m r \ym Hubbard to managfe] the Same, and do fully impower him to 
admitt to, & confer upon the Persons concern'd their Degrees belong- 
ing to them respectively. 

John Richards. 

p Order. 

July 2. 1684. 2 
The Rev d m r President Rogers dyed. The Sun begining to emerge 
ou[t] of a Central Ecclyps. 



College Stock . . April. 29. 1693. 3 



foI.« li s 
65 50 .. 

65 20 .. 

66 30 .. 

66 1125 10 

67 15 .. 

67 34 6 

68 100 . . 
68 8 10 
68 21 2 

68 5 .. 

69 62 8 
69 15 1 

69 1 19 

70 25 .. 

70 341 4 

71 30 .. 
71 89 5 
71 26 .. 
73 80 .. 
73 15 .. 
76 50 .. 
76 25 .. 

76 60 .. 

77 15 .. .. 

56 10 2 

1288 15 6 

241 16 6 

1530 12 



1 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written partly in the margin. 

2 This entry, in the hand of President Leverett, is written in the margin. 

3 This account is in the hand of President Leverett. 

4 It is not known to what book these folios refer. 

5 This figure has perhaps been altered. 



Interest due 


11 a d 


Octob 


. 4.92 




Augst 17.93 


2 00 


Aug. 


19.93 


12 00 


Aug 


23.93 


18 00 


June 


2.93 


1 16 


Augst 


24.93 


48 00 


Apr. 


8.93 


6 1 6 


Sept. 


29.93 


3 20 


Mar. 


29.93 


1 30 


Sept 


29.93 


11 20 


July 


20.93 


1 40 


Oct. 


29.92 




Sept 


15.93 


14 


May. 


28.93 


74 8 


Apr. 


1.93 


2 80 


Sept. 


29.93 


14 4 


Sept 


28.93 


3 40 


Janoj 


23.92 


6 80 


Pebr. 


12.92 


4 16 


July. 


25.93 


12 


Nov. 


21.92 




Apr. 


26.93 


4 16 


June. 


16.93 


1 40 


Apr. 


19.93 






241 16 6 



Mr Sami Goff 

Mr Saffil Paine, Cap* Jno Holbrok 
Mr Robert & Benja Badcock . . 

M r Elias Parkman 

Jno Bunker & Jam. Lowden . . . 

Ingolls & Burge3 

Mr Richd Wharton 

David Mead 

Ebenezer & Jchabod Brown . . 

Jno Barnard 

Wm Smith 

Wm Shaddock. Jno Stratton . . 

Jno Green 

Joseph Holmes & Bligh 

Mr Edward Pelham 

Mr Matthew Bridge 

Mr Jno Jackson 

M r Joseph Webb 

Lt Richd Way 

Seth Perry 

Edwd Hill of Boston, & Capt White 

Capt Richd Crispe 

Simon Crosby Billerica Jos. Crosby 
Nathl Wilson Sen* junf & Sami 

Wilson 

Jn y e hands of Jn° Rich d s y e 

BallcofAccts 



Cambridge 
Weymoth 
Milton . 
Boston . 
Charlestown 
Lynn . . 
Boston . 
Billerica . 
Cambridge 
Watertown 
Boston . 
Watertown 
Cambridge 
Boston . 
Road Jsland 
Cambridge 
Cambridge 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Weymoth 
Boston . 
Brantrey 



Bond 

Bond 

Bond_ 

Mortg 

Bond 

Rent 

Bond 

Bill 

Bond 

Bill 

Mortg 

Bond 

Bond 

Bond_ 

Mortg 

Bond 

Bond 

Bond 

Mortg 

Bill 

Bond 

Bond 

Bond 



Cambr. VillS Bond 



256 



COLLEGE BOOK III 



Donations to the Colledge. 
Jn New-England. In England. 

M r Greenliffs house. M r Webs gift a a M r W m Penoyer 

P Annu 12 out of a farme in 

Cap 1 Keyn's Legacy a house, p Annu 10 Norfolk formerly 

M r Glovers Annuity 5 let at 44* p An: now 

M r Coggin's gift, meadow at Lynn 8 at 30* out of w ch 

M r Newgates Annuity p Annum . . 5 Corporation for In- 
Bumkin Jsland let to Js c Lobdel p dians 10* p Annu, 

Annu 2 5 and to y e Coll: y r 

Land at Watertown to Sam 1 Liver- hath com but about 

more p An 15 13* p Annu as p M r 

Charlstown Ferry p Annum .... 50 Edw d Whites Acc° 241 16 6 
Elder Penns Annuity J guess p Annu 10 for 2 last years. 103 10 
A Deed of Land bought of M r Betts This p d to March 23 00 

pains pf .. .. 25. 1685. 368 06 6 

103 10 Jn o Dodridge 

Esq r 10 u p Anna 
paid to Febr. 84. 
Thei Subst c of y s 
dd d to his Exell c y 
S r E Andr[os] 

[86 2 ] 

M r Nathaniel Hulton of Newington Green gave 130 11 
M r Thomas 3 Gunston of Stock-Newington gave 065 11 



Whether do you consent That the Rev d m r Ioshua Moodey be 



emo The At a Meeting of the Corporation of Harvard College luly 21. 1684. 

ibers of the & r & J 

oration wr 
Revd Mr 
Sherman, 

ncr. Mather chosen Presid 1 of Harvard College ? Voted in the Affirmative. 

sell. Hobart o 

Andrew 
Cotton 

Richards 
Treasurr 



Sept 1684. 

The Corporation having Nominated the Rev d m r Ioshua Moodey 
for Presid 1 of the College, The Overseers declared their consent to 
and Approbation thereof, and appointed Maj r Dan 1 Gookin Esq r 

i Two or three words (clearly the date) before "The" cannot be deciphered, 
the bottom of the page being trimmed off. 

2 All the entries on page [86] of the text are, with the possible exception of 
the first two lines, in the hand of President Leverett. 

3 A word or part of a word, apparently "Gun," is here crossed out. This 
line and the preceding line were perhaps written at a later date, and are per- 
haps in a different hand. 



CORPORATION MEETINGS, 1684-1685 257 

Samuel Nowel Esq r and the Rev d m r Xohn Eliot as their Comittee 
in the Name 1 of the Overseers to acquaint m r Moodey therewith and 
desire his Accept a of s d Trust and place. 

Octob r 14. 1684. 

The Comittee appointed to treat with M r Moodey concerning his 
accept of the Presid ts Place made return to the Overseers, That M r 
Moodey's Answer was on the Negative. 

The Overseers Order'd the Corporation forthwith 2 to gceed to the 
Nominacon of som other meet Person for s d Place and Trust. 

At a Meeting of the Corporation in Carhbr. Oct pf° 1684. 

Order'd That the rent of House belonging to the College now Let 
to Seth Perry shal for this year be disposed of for the Encouragm* 
of the Rogers's in case they shall continue to be in Comons. 

Order'd That the Schollars of the house for the next year shalbe, 
S r Danforth, Dudley, Cotton, Rogers Sen r , Rogers Iun r , Mitchel. 

At a Meeting of the Corporation in Boston, Oct. 16. 1684. 

Order'd That out of M r Penoyers money rec d by & now in the hands 
of the Hon d Maj r Richards £18 shalbe disposed of to m r Andrew, 
and £18 to m r Iohn Cotton the Present Fellows of the College. 

At a Meeting of Corporation Oct. 30 th 1684. 

M r Samuel Mitchel was chosen a Probationer, and desired to under- 
take the charge of the Class of the Sophimores untill further order. 

At a Meeting of the Corporation of the College in Carhbr. 
March 2 d 168*. 

Order'd that ten pounds shalbe given to Davenport out of m r 
Penoyers Gift, and of that money now in the hands of the Hoii d Maj r 
Richards. 



1 The first letter in this word has been altered. 

2 The fourth and fifth letters in this word are interlined. 



258 COLLEGE BOOK III 

At a Meeting of the Corporation of the College in Cambridge 
March 23. 84/5. 

Voted that S r Saltonstall be chosen Buttler. 

Voted, That m r Leverett be chosen a Probationer, and be desired 
to take the Care of the Class of Sophimores. 

At a Meeting of the Corporation in Cambridge, May 4° 1685. 

Order'd that what is or shalbe due to the College from Mather 
Iun r on ace* of Detrim ts shalbe remitted. 

Order'd, That out of the absent Comons of bread & bear shalbe 
allow'd to y e Buttler Thirty Shillings on ace* of washing the Trenchers. 

Order'd, That m r Andrew Bordman be appointed the College 
Cook. 

June 11 th 1685. 

At a Meeting of the Hon & Rev* 1 Overseers of Harvard 1 College 

at Boston. 

The Rev d m r Increase Mather was requested to take special Care 
of the Governm* 2 of the College, and for that End act as Presid* till 
a further Settlm* be Orderly made. Exemplar verum Tho : Danf orth. 

At a meeting of the Corporacon in Cambr July. 2. 1685. 

Whereas y e Gen 1 Court held at Bost May 27. 1685 has order'd that 
y e £100 p* of the Anual Salary for the Presid 1 be p d to the Corporacon, 
It is hereby order'd by y e Corporacon that y e s d £100 shal be disposed 
of as follows, viz 1 ^ £10 to m r Leverett and £40 to m r Cotton y e present 
fellows of the College, & £50 to m r Marling in full discharge of what 
is due from y e College on ace* of disbursm ts . 

At a meeting of the Corporation in Cambr Sept. 15. 1685. 

m r John Leverett & m r Sam 1 Mitchel were chosen Fellows of the 
College. 



1 The word "Harvard" is interlined, being written above a word (perhaps 
"said") crossed out. 

2 Written over "College." 



RULES FOR THE COLLEGE STEWARD, 1686 259 

Voted, That m r Andrew Bordman's Salary as Cook shalbe £40 
Annualy. 

Order 'd That £10 be allow'd to Each of the three fellows out of 
the mony in Maj r Rich ds hands 

It was agreed by the Presid* & Fellows, That to the Buttlers Nov r 25. 1685. 
Annual allow for Candles sn d be added 10 s on y e ace* of what 
is Spent in drawing Cider. 

[87] 

1686. 

Rules & Orders respecting the Steward Cook & Butler Of 
Harvard College * 

1. Respecting the Steward 

The Steward shall take y e Sole Care of, & provide at y e Currant 2 
Price all Necessarys and meet Provisions 3 for y e Offices of y e Cook & 
Butler, according as y e Colledge 4 Occasions whether Ordinary or 
extraordinary shal require 5 & seasonably deliver y e Same at y e 
respective Offices. 

The Steward shall deliver in unto y e Butler his Bread at five ShiP 
p Bushell & his Beer at four p Barrell each Barrell consisting of 16 
Gal ons of Beer measure allowing thereto two pecks of Barley Malt. 

He shall Quarterly require 6 & receive of y e Butler & Cook an 
Account of y e particular Debts & shall present them with one entire 
Account of both drawn up on y e fryday fortnight after y e Quarter Day 
to y e Rector & Tutors for their Approbation & Examination to w ch 
being added in their respective Collumnes, Detriments, Study rents, 
Tuition, Punishm ts The Monitors Allowance, Gallery Money, Glass 
mending & y e said Bill being either signed 7 by y e Rector or Tutors, 
the Steward shall forthwith make Demand of & receive w* shall be 



1 These " Rules & Orders," pages [87-88] of the text, are in the hand of A. 

2 The second "t" in this word is interlined. 

3 A letter is here crossed out. 

4 The letter "g" in this word is interlined. 

5 The words "shal require" are interlined. 

6 The letter " i " in this word is interlined. 

7 The word "either" has been here interlined and then crossed out. 



260 COLLEGE BOOK III 

due thereon, 1 from 2 y e several Debtors & (saving onely for such Debts 
as shall be allowed, by those whom it may concern, to be desperate 
and so remitted by them) shall psonally stand engaged & be ac- 
countable for y e same as follows. 

1. To the College Treasures for all Study rents, Detriments, Pun- 
ishments, Gallery Money Glass-mending & c 

2 To the Tutor for Tuition & half Tuition charged on their re- 
spective Pupils Account. 

3 To the Monitor for w* is charg'd in y e Monitors Collumn. 

4. The Steward shall not 3 give Orders to the Cook & Butler for 
their receiving any Scholar into Commons and sizings but they shall 
receive orders from 4 y e rector or one of y e Tutors for y r Commons 
or Sizings, but they shall receive Orders from y e rector or one of y e 
Tutors for their being put out for either. 

The Steward shall be allowed for his Cost and Pains the whole 
sum that is 5 charged in the Collumnes of Commons and sizings, 
supposing the Sum shall not amount to sixty Pounds p Quarter, and 
if the Said Sum shall amount to more, the Steward shall pay to the 
College Treasurer one sixth 6 Part or if six of the Excess and 
accordingly if the Said Sum shall fall short of the fore mentioned 
Sum of sixty Pounds, the College Treasurer shall allow him one third 
of this Defect. 

2 Respecting the Cook and Butler 

1 The Butler and Cook are to look into all the College Utensils 
and Vessels greap] and small delivered by Inventory to them and on 
every Quarter Day to deliver into the Rector or Tutors an Inventory 
therof. particularly shewing vr Detriment is befallen the College, and 
by what Means, whether by Wearth in their just Usage (w ch the 
Steward shall repair at ^ College Charge 7 ) or by any abuse or Neg- 
lect of any Scholar or Schollers w ch shall be charged to their Account 8 



1 This word is altered. 

2 Altered from "for." 

3 The word "not" is interlined. 

4 This word is altered. 

5 Substituted for "of," crossed out. 
This word is altered. 

7 The word "Charge" is interlined. 

8 The letter "n" in this word is interlined. 



r * 

* v 

M 



■sN 






S 

> 



J 
















^ 






J*&***4. -OC-Ai 



1*2 -s<p 



'*?y*"*y 




v^ I ^< 1* 'CV •4**qrf»,£fi <*~sy_l ***.}[ 4p*j**yw^ 



'» ' 




^/»^^V^7 



7/ 



w~ 






RULES FOR THE COLLEGE COOK AND BUTLER, 1686 261 

in y e Stewards Generall Bill ; -if & * if Detriment Come to y e fore- 
mentioned Vessels or Utensils by any out of the Society. 

Then those Officers that y e Utensils belonged to shall themselves 
be responsable to y e College for y e s d Detrim*, for that they are not 
but at their Peril to Communicate w t is y e Colleges to any not related 
thereto. 

2 The Butler and Cook shall see y* y e Utensils and vessels to their 
several Offices, appertaining As, 2 Pots, Cups, Saltsellars & c to y e 
Butler, Platters, trenchers & c to the Cook from Day to Day be kept 
clean and fit for 4he Use and at all mealtimes they shall deliv er them 
out as y e Publick Service of the Hall requres to y e Servitors, w ch shall 
be responsable for them untill they return them to y e Buttery Hatch 
& Kitching as [ 88 ] is requisite 3 and if any Scholar or Scholars shall 
at any time take away or detaine any Vessels of y e Colleges, great or 
small from y e Hall out of Doors 4 from y e Sight of y e Buttery Hatch 
without y e Butlers or Servitors Approbation, He or they shall be 
punish' t three pence 5 Shill^ but if y e S d Vessels be detained by any. 
as to be wanting next Meal, he or they so detaining shall be punish'd 
twelve pence this Punishment to be noted distinctly by itself 

3 The Butler and Cook shall see that all y e rooms peculiar to 
their Offices, together w th their Appurtenances, be set & kept in 
Order, clean and sweet from all manner of filthiness and in Defect 
therof they shall p y e rector, or Tutors, be punish'd one Shil g or more 
as y e Crime deserves. 

4. Neither the Butler nor y e Cook shall suffer any Scholar or 
Scholars Whatsoever, excepting y e Tutors, Masters of Arts, or Fellow 
Commoners to come into y e Kitchen or Buttery unless on some ex- 
traordinary Occasion. 

5. They shall not deliver, att Meal Times, except in Case of Sik- 
ness, or other just and allowable Causes, any Commons to any 
Scholar, save to y e Servitors, nor they to any saving y e Scholars setting 
orderly in the Hall 

6. The Butler receiving his Bread at 5 s p Bushel shall advance 



1 Written over "a." 

2 Altered from "as." 

3 Substituted for "necessary," crossed out. 

4 The fourth letter in this word has been altered. 

5 The word 



262 COLLEGE BOOK III 

tenpence on a Bushell and receiving his Beer at 4 8 p Barrel shall 
advance 4 d on y e Shilling, y e Cook receiving Provisions from y e 
Steward at Currant Price shall advance 6 d on y e Shill g . 

7. The Butler and Cook on every friday Noon shall give an 
Account to every Scholar demanding it of his Weeks sizings. 

8. The Butler shall provide Candles for y e Hall, and at the End 
shall receive 20 s annually of y e Steward w ch shall be put equally upon 
v* 5 Scholars heads 

9. The Butler shall call y e Rector to Prayers Morning and Evening 
at the Set Times, and tole and ring y e Bell at five of the clock * in y e 
Morning and at nine in the Evening. 

10. The Butler shall allow to the College for y e absent Commons 
quarterly 10 s ; for y e faithfull Discharge of his Office he shall be 
allowed by the College twelve pounds p Annum 

The College Laws 2 

It 3 was then Agreed, That Davenport Sen r sh d have £12. allow'd 
him out of that money of M r Penoyers now in the hands of the Hon d 
Maj r Richards. 

Order'd, That the Fence between the College Lands and M ra 
Mitchel's shalbe forthwith set up, And that M r Cotton be desired to 
take care to see it don. 

Order'd, That M r Cotton and M r Leverett shall each of them be 
allowed £10 out of M r Penoyers Legacy now in the hands of Maj r 
Richards. 

Order'd, That M r Sam 1 Mitchel shall have £10 allow'd him out 
of M r Dodderige's Gift now in the hands of Maj r Richards. 

Order'd by the Presid 4 ^ and Fellows, That what is due to the Col- 
ledge from the two S r Williamses on the ace 1 of Detrim ts shalbe 
remitted. 

Order'd, That for the Present year M r Penoyer's Legacy shalbe 
disposed of To the present Tut rs M r Leverett and M r Brattle, and to 
Davenport Sen r and Iones each of them six pounds. 



1 The words "of the clock" are interlined. 

2 Some words are here crossed out. 

3 The remaining entries on page [88] of the text are in the hand of President 
Leverett. 



INDEX TO COLLEGE LANDS AND ANNUITIES 263 

[89 1 ] 
[90] 

Index, refering to y e Pages Immediately following in ys Book 

College lands sold p. 90 [91 2 ] 

College Homestead . 90 [91] 

Lands in Cambridge 91. 2. 3 [92-94] 

Elder Chamney's Gift p. 92 [93] 

M r Heywards, in Watertown . 93 [94] 

Shawshin Farm 93 [94] 

Bumpkin Iseland 93 [94] 

M r Coggan's Marsh 94 [95] 

M r Webbs House in Boston 94 [95] 

M r Stoughton's Lands Dorchester 3 94 [95] 

M r Ezek. Rogers — Rowley 95 [96] 

Judge Sewal's. 500. Acres 95 [96] 

M r D. Russel's — Saco 96 [97] 

At Paucatuck, Narragaset 98 [99] 

Merricaneag, Province of 4 Main 100 [101] 

At Rutland 101 [102] 

At Lunenburgh 102 [103] 

At Townsend 103 [104] 

M r Danforth's, in Framingham 103 [104] 

Hopkinton Coll. Brown's 104 [105] 

M r Nath 1 Wards conveyance 104 (1) [105] 

Robert Cooks Grant 105 [106] 

General Courts 800. Acres 105 [106] 

Edward Jackson's. 400. Acres 106 [107] 

M r Atkinson's 106 [107] 

M r Newdigate's . . . . 107 [108] 

M r Glover's 107 [108] 



1 Page [89] is blank. 

2 The figures within square brackets are not in the original, but have been 
added for the sake of convenience as indicating the pagination followed in the 
text. 

3 The word ° Dorchester " is interlined. 

4 The word " of " is interlined. 



Vid. p. 95. 114. & 123. & 124. 4 



264 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Major Sedgwick's shop 107 [108] 

Cap t Scarlet's 7. L. pr An 108 [109] 

Charlestown-Ferry 108 [109] 

Elder Perm's L. 10. pr An 108 [109] 

Hopkinton Rents 109 [110] 

M r Penoyer's Legacy 109 [110] 

M r Dodderidge's Legacy 110 [111] 

Esq r Boyle's Donation HO 1 [111] 

Marsh in Dorchester giv'n) Lib. 4. p. 13. 2 

by Govern 1 " Stoughton. J Plan of it. pa. 101. 3 
Rogers's Farm Lying in y e 

Town of Waltham purchas'd 

with the Money w ch was 

the Produce of the Sale of 

the Rev^ Lands giv'n 

to the Colleg by the Rev d 

Mr. Ezekiel Rogers of Rowley 

[91] 

Lands & Annuities belonging to Harvard College. 5 

Whereas y e Lands and Annuities belonging to Harvard College, 
are entred in y e College Books after a broken disjointed manner, I 
(Benja. Wadsworth, Presided Dec. 10. 1733) thought it proper to 
collect said Entries, and what I find further belong to them, & enter 
them here, in a more uniform compact manner. 

And here I would premise, yt some Tenements 6 or Lands entred 
in y e College Books, as formerly belonging to it, have since been 
sold, 7 viz. Capt. Kein's House in Boston, given to y e College, was 

1 To this point, the entries on page [90] of the text are in the hand of Presi- 
dent Wadsworth. The remaining entries on page [90] of the text are in the hand 
of President Holyoke. 

2 The reference is to page [341] of College Book IV. 

3 The reference is to page [102] of the text, or page 279 of this volume. 

4 The references are to pages [96, 115, 124, 125] of the text, or pages 271, 
292, 300, 301 of this volume. 

6 The entries on pages [91-114] of the text are, with the exceptions mentioned 
in the footnotes, in the hand of President Wadsworth. 

6 The syllable "ments " is interlined. 

7 The word "sold" is interlined. 



COLLEGE HOMESTEAD, CAMBRIDGE 



265 



sold July. 8. 1696. by order of y e Corporation, to Coll. Paige for. 
L. 160. See M r Treasurer Brattle's College Book. n° 5. p. 43. 1 

Item. 20. Acres of Land at Lexington, granted to y e College by 
y e Town of Cambridge, (as appears by their Town-Records) sold 
to Gregory Stone for L. 50. An. 1721. See College Book n° 4. p. 70. 2 

Item sold about six Acres Southside Charlse River to John oldham. 
1714. See College Book. n° 4. p. 45. 53. 3 

Mem. Tho there were 4 Corporation votes, to sell a strip of Land 
in Cambridge Neck 3J Acres; and in Fresh-pond Meadows 1J. 
Acre ; yet I dont find yt hitherto they have been sold. 

As for yt oblong parcel of Land, on which y e three Colleges & y e 
President's House & Barn now stand ; I suppose y e Easterly part of 
it, was granted by y e Town of Cambridge An. 1638. to y e use of a 
publick school or College forever, containing 2f Acres. 5 The College 
expended on it. above L. 300. (See Coll. Book N° 3. p. 2 e ) & it appears 
not yt y e Town ever allow'd them their charges. 7 The westerly part 
of y e South end (where y e President's House now is) was bought of 
Edward Goffe w th a Building on it, afterwards call'd Goffe's College. 
See Coll. Book, tt n° 2. p. 18. 8 n° 3. p: 41. 9 That part wch runs 
northward from Cambridge Meeting House, even to a rod or two 
north of y e present old College, was bought of John Betts. April. 4. 
1661. and entred with y e Records of Deeds for Middlesex, Lib. 13. p. 
424-5. This Land was bought with money given to y e College by 
m r William Payn merchant, and by his son. See Coll. B. n° 2. p. 38. B. 
3. p. 30. 10 The northwest corner of y e Land where y e Colleges are, was 
sold by Thomas Swetman to Michael Spencer. Dec 10. 1677. entred in 
y e Register at [ 92 ] Cambridge. Lib. 8. 287. And sold by Michael 
Spencer to y e College Jun. 12. 1697. entred in y e Registry of Deeds for 



1 The reference is to page 43 of College Book V. 

2 The reference is to page [70] of College Book IV. 

3 The reference are to pages [45, 53] of College Book IV. 

4 The word "were" is interlined. 

6 After "Acres" there is a caret, indicating that a passage in the right 
margin should be inserted here. 

6 The reference is to page [2] of the text, or page 172 of this volume. 

7 This sentence is written in the margin. 
3 College Book II is not extant. 

9 The words "n° 3. p: 41." are interlined in the hand of President Langdon. 
The reference is to page [41] of the text, or page 208 of this volume. 
10 The reference is to page [30] of the text, or page 198 of this volume. 



20 Acres at 
Lexington sold. 



6 Acres sold 



266 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Middlesex. B. 12. p. 80. 81. These three Deeds of Betts, Swetman, 
& Spencer, 4s- are with y e College Treasurer. 
an pre8ident! On y e soutn s ^ e °f y e street, Just before y e President's House as it 
18e - now stands, is a small piece of Land belonging to y e College; it was 

formerly Robert Bradish's House Lot. When it was leas'd to Steward 
Bordman. 1705. y e bounds were, about. 115. feet on y e street north of 
it; on another street Eastwardly about eighty nine feet; on y e south, 
one hundred fifteen feet, as on y e north (ys south side, and y e west 
side, now Join on Steward Bordman's Land) and y e West side is of y 6 
same length with y e East, viz. eighty nine feet. I suppose part of Stew- 
ard Bordman's Barn now stands on y e northwest corner of this Land. 
■o3. P 4n This Land was call'd y e House Lot of Robert Bradish. Coll. B. [2. 
[p. 18. [N B Part of 2 this Land was taken into y e Presidents use in 
Autumn 1770 : leaving so much of it with 3 out-e£ y e fence then made 
as might accommodate M r Andrew Boardman to go to his Barn. 
Agree d by y e Corporation that he should have some at y e west End 
left him and more on y e South west Corner but no lease was given of 
it - nor any Time act twas only allowed for the present — and no sum 
was fixed as a consideration for y e use of it] 4 
k Dd sel n B y l A long slip of Land in Cambridge Neck. 3J Acres occupi'd formerly 
L43. 149.6 " by j oseph Cook# Coll. B. 2. p. 18. Since yt, occupi'd by Coll. 
Je coii. b. Foxcroft, and by Coll. GofTe;it's bounded, west bv V e Land of M r 

Lp. 143. 149.6 J . . 

Thomas Foxcroft, north by an Highway, East by an Highway lead- 
ing towards Captain's Iseland (so called) south 

fn.8Nov.i5. Francis Foxcroft Esq r shew'd me B. Wadsworth 7 a deed dated y 6 
1. day of — 1653. wherein y e Corporation sold two Acres of Land to 
Tho. Danforth, Esq r and they 9 had in lieu of it, y e above 3J Acres. 

rest fields. An Acre and half in Cambridge West Fields, or Fresh-pond 
Meadow, bounded by Deacon Bowman's Land 

1 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Langdon. The reference 
is to page [41] of the text, or page 208 of this volume. 

2 The words "Part of" are interlined. 
8 The word "with" is interlined. 

4 The " N B " is in the hand of President Langdon. The square brackets 
are in the original. 

6 The references are to pages [143, 149] of College Book IV. 
8 The references are to pages [143, 149] of College Book IV. 

7 The words "B. Wadsworth" are interlined. 

8 A word underneath this is crossed out. 
8 The word "they" is interlined. 



COLLEGE LOTS IN CAMBRIDGE ROCKS, 1689 267 

Lands laid out on south side Charlse River. 1662. in the seventh southside 

Ccarlsriver 

division, to y e College, three Acres. 

[93] 

More land on southside Charles River, granted by y e Town Feb. Lot. 33. s. side 

* & J J Charles River. 

27. 1664. & March. 27. 1665. Lot. 33. to y e College, thirty Acres and x 
three Commons. This is on Cambridge Town Records. Treasurer 
Brattle's Book. p. 84. says, 2 (Dec. 4. 3 1704) ys land was surveyed 
about. 30. years agoe by order of y e Town's Committee, by David 
Fisk, and review'd last April by ditto ; yt it was eighty Rod long, & 
Sixty Broad; yt it was platted, & lay west of their Meeting House 
(scil. Newtown) and not far from Charles River. It's now let to 
Jonathan Wiilard for nine years begining March. 25. 1726. at. 15. 
shillings per Annum. 
From Richard Champney's Will. Jun. 30. 1669. on Record of Wills Eider c hamp _ 

i «/ ney's. 40. Acres 

in Middlesex. Lib. 3. p. 139. an Extract, viz. • k*ewtown. 

I do give and bequeath those Lands lately granted & laid out to 
me by y e Town of Cambridge, near to y e Falls on Charles River, con- 
taining fourty Acres more or less, unto Harvard College in y e same 
Town, as an expression of my willingness to further y e Education of 
youth in all godly Literature. 

This Farm was survey 'd by David Fisk. An. 1704. a Plat of it is 
with College Treasurer. 'Twas leased to m r Nath 1 Hubbard for. 99. 
years, begining March. 25. 1705. for. 20 s pr An. If payment of Rent 
be neglected. 30. days after 'tis due, y e College may reenter. 

Lots granted in Cambridge Rocks. 1689. in y e first division y e fif- R ^Lot g i5 
teenth Lot was laid out to Harvard College, twelve Acres, bounded, 
Thomas Fox southwest, Highway southeast, Sam 1 Cook north easterly, 
Joseph Cook & Nath 1 Hancock northwest. 

In y e second division Lot. 36. y e College, twelve Acres, bounded Lot. 36. 
Peter Town south west, Ephraim Cutter John Cooper and John 
Marret South East, Jonathan Remington northeast, Nath 1 Pattin 
& Edward Winship northwest. 

A Record of Lots laid out in Cambridge, & voted to be recorded. 

1 Here a letter or mark is crossed out. 

2 The reference is to page 84 of College Book V. 

3 The words "Dec. 4." are interlined. 



>t. G6 



268 COLLEGE BOOK III 

May. 12. 1707. In in y e lower division on y e north side Menotomy 
River, & at Mill's Ware. 

The sixty sixth Lot to Harvard College, seven Acres and an half, 
JJ e bounded northeasterly w th Sam 1 Cooper, south westerly w th Sam 1 
Se [ ou !t e Andrew, northwesterly w th an High way, south westerly w th M r John 
Whiting. 

>t. 77. The seventy seventh Lot to Harvard College, one Acre three Quar- 

ters & twenty Rods, bounded northwest Sam 1 Hastings, south East 
John Swan, north East John Holmes, south westerly an Highway. 

>t. 12. In y e upper division on y e East side y e Bridges, y e twelf Lot to 

Harvard College, seven Acres & an half, bounded southerly w th John 
Holmes — now 16- 1733 I'm Inform'd, Joseph Underwood is on a[Z/] 
sides of i[t] 3 

>t. 6. A division of Lands in Cambridge, platted in March. 1724. and 

voted yt y e Lots be recorded accordingly April. 17. 1724. [94] In y e 
Lower division. N°. 6. to Harvard College, one Acre & twenty seven 
Ptods, bounded, Easterly Ephraim Frost's Heirs, westerly Henry 
Prentice, northerly Henry Prentice, southerly w th y e Common. 

Note, this Lot lies near y e College, viz. Just a cross y e Common 
northward 4 from Cambridge Burying place. 

>t. 58. To Harvard College four Acres and an half & twenty eight Rods, 

bounded, Easterly with y 6 Countrey Road, southwesterly w th an 
Highway, northerly w th Deacon Cooledge, & southwardly Capt. 
Bordman. Mill's ware. High Way runs across this Lot. 

Mem. All these ten 5 preceeding Parcels of Land belonging to y e 
College (excepting Elder Chamney's Gift) are recorded in Cam- 
bridge Town Books for Records of Lands. 

r d g?v^ at by ^ n Extract from ^ Will of John Heyward of Charlestown dated 

a ey g ward. y July 1672> on R ec0 rd of Wills for Middlesex Lib. 3. p. 272. 

I give unto y e College at Cambridge my House Lot by y e Pond in 
Watertown lying for twenty four Acres. 

It appears by a Lease of this Land to Daniel Livermore. An. 
1696. it was then bounded, north by y e Fresh Pond, East by Pals- 

1 A word or figure is here crossed out. 

2 The reference is to page 85 of College Book V. 

3 The words "sides of i[t]" are interlined. 

4 The word " northward " is interlined. 
c This word is underscored. 



COLLEGE LAND IN RUMNEY MARSH 269 

grave Wellington, West y e Widow Beers, south by Lands of Grant 
Cooledge & Wellington. 

Cambridge Town Records Book. 1. p. 33. shew, yt. 1639. five F s^ aw shin 
hundred Acres at Shawshin (now Billerica) were granted to m r 1 
Henry Dunster President of Harvard College ; one hundred Acres of 
which was for y e use of Harvard College. Our College Book N° 3. 
p. 16. 2 says, m r Henry Dunster gave one hundred Acres more adjoining 
to y e former. As appears by a Lease of ys Land to Richardson & 
Hosely. 1708. it was then bounded, south by y e Land lately m r 
Daniel's, East by Woburn Line, northerly Joseph Walker, westerly 
by several mens Lots. A Plat of ys Land, (now w th y e Coll. Treas- 
urer,) taken by Jonathan Danforth Jun. 19. 1699 (when y e Bounds 
were renewed) calls ys Farm two hundred & twenty Acres. The 
Bounds were renew'd again. 1718. by Sam 1 Danforth surveyer, 
present Joseph Walker, James Hasley, D r Simon Crosby. Mem° 

a Plan of this Farm taken by Capt. Caleb Brooks, is enter'd in this 
College 3 this Book N o 3 4 122 .5 

this r 

M r Samuel Ward of Charlestown, by a j~La 6 or Instrument un- [TF]ards, or 

J a deed [pumpkin [Jjae- 

der his hand. April. 9. 1680. Which is entred with Records of deeds land - 
for Suffolk. Lib. 21. p. 278. gave to Harvard College, his Iseland, be- 
tween y e Towns of Hingham & Hull, called Bumpkin or Wards 
Iseland, containing about thirty Acres. This now rents for about 
L. 23. pr An. 

[95] 

M r John Cosrgan Merchant in Boston, by a deed or Instrument Mr coggan's 

' * - Marsh at Rum- 

under his hand (now with y e Coll. Treasurer) dated Jan. 16. 1654/5. ney Marsh 
gave to y e College a Parcel of salt marsh in Rumney Marsh. Our 



1 The word " m r " is interlined. 

2 The reference is to page [16] of the text, or page 184 of this volume. 

3 The word "this" is underscored and above it is written "College" in the 
hand of President Langdon. 

4 The words " N° 3 " are interlined in the hand of President Langdon. 

5 The reference is to page [123] of the text, or page 299 of this volume. The 
words beginning with "Mem°" and ending with "122" are in the hand of Presi- 
dent Holyoke. 

6 The words "a deed" are underscored, and above them is written in a dif- 
ferent hand "Will," also underscored. 



270 COLLEGE BOOK III 

College Book. n° 3. p. 16. 1 calls it seventy Acres, and says, M r Cog- 
gan confirm'd it under his hand & seal. An. 1652. bounded on three 
sides with y** River or great Creek, and a Lease given of it (1709) 
says, on y e fourth side with Capt. Flood's Marsh runing in a straight 
line from one side of y e s d River or Creek to y e other. This marsh 
was platted by M r John Gardner An. 1716. The use of ^ marsh is 
for y e College, but if any of 2 M r Coggan's children or Grandchildren 
should be at the College, they to have y e benefit while continuing 
there. The Plat of ys is with y e Treasurer, of y e College. The Present 
Rents between. 20. & L. 25. pr An. 
■ in Boston" ^ r Henry Webb of Boston, by his Will. April. 5. 1660. gave to y* 
College an House & Land in Boston. This Tenement is now Leas'd 
to M r William Payne for ninety nine years, begining March. 25. 1710. 
in this Lease y e Bounds are thus described, viz. Westerly in y e Front 
by Cornhil one and thirty feet and an half; easterly in y e Rere by 
Pudding Lane, twenty four feet ; northerly by Housing & Lands of 
John Campbel; southerly by y e Housing & Lands of Enoch Green- 
leaf and y e late Thomas a field, extending in depth on 3 each side from 
Front to Rere, about one hundred thirty five feet. M r Payne is to 
give twelve Pounds pr An. for this Tenement; at two payments 
annually, viz. L. 6. on or before Sept. 29. & y e other six, on or before 
the 25 th of March. If he fails of making payment for more than 
thirty days after 'tis due, & demanded, y e College may reenter. 
m sto^i* ^he Hon ble William Stoughton Esq r Live tenant Governour, late 
^hest^^ °f Dorchester; besides his building of yt College nowcall'd Stoughton's 
College, 4 did in his last Will & Testament, give to Harvard College, 
a Pasture in Dorchester, twenty three Acres; bounded An. 1718. 
Easterly by Israel Leadbetter, southerly Sam 1 Jones & Isaac Ryal, 
westerly by Land yt is or was Joshua Henshaws, northerly John 
Robinson, measuring on each side about eighty Rods, and at each 
end about fourty Rods. 

In y e same Will, he also gave to y e College four Acres of Marsh in 
Dorchester, (sometimes in y e occupation of John B Trescot) 6 bounded 



1 The reference is to page [16] of the text, or page 184 of this volume. 

2 The word "of" is interlined. 

3 Substituted for "from," crossed out. 

4 The words " Stoughton's College " are underscored. 
fi The word "John" is interlined. 

e There is here a caret. 



f TeiH0&*i& '«x^ '■**£- *&£ 



PLAN I 



rf 



\ 
V 



cJGrfifot/l^ej ^/?rc&f 






19 



! >F 



\ 








&n*?'<arrr/ /f>>. ■ '/if 



zzz 



COLLEGE LANDS IN ROWLEY 271 

1735. South, Georg|>] Minot; westerly & Easterly, Tho. Tolman; 
northerly, Israel How & Samuel Jones * These two Parcels, viz. y e 
Pasture & Marsh, were by M r Stoughton's Executors convey'd by 
Livery & seizen to M r Tho. Brattle College Treasurer, Aug. 4. 1703. 
as appears by a written Instrument now in y e Coll. Treasurer's 
hands. The yearly Incomes of these Lands, to be for y e benefit of 
some Dorchester scholar, if none such at College then to some Milton 
scholar, if none such to an Indian student, and in want of such, to any 
well deserving yt is needy. [ 96 ] See more of this Will of y e Hon ble 
M r Stoughton's, Coll. Book. N°. 4. p. 13. at y e latter end of yt Book. 2 

The Rev nd M r Ezekiel Rogers Minister in Rowley, in his last Will Rev^MrEzek: 
& Testament gave Sundry Parcels of Land in Rowley to his wife, 
after her decease to y e Church & Town of Rowley, towards enabling 
them ye better to maintain two teaching Elders, in case they 3 should 
be four years destitute of two such Elders, he then gave said Lands to 
Harvard College. According to y e tenour of this Will, y e foresaid 
Lands came to y e College, and they rec d Rents for them, from 4 An. 
dom. 1701. March. 25. (& ever since) see Treasurer Brattle's fol. 
Book. p. 72. 5 M r Rogers's Will, is on y e Record of Wills at Ipswich. 
I've seen an Attestation under y e hand of Thomas Lambert Town 
Clerk of Rowley. Jan. 22. 1677. yt y e s d M r Rogers was buried. Jan. 
21. 1660. & M rs Rogers Feb. 12. 1678. See a large Paragraph of this 
Will, Coll. Book n° 4. at y e latter end. p. 10. 6 

The Corporation of y e College have lately petitioned the General vm: infra p. 
Court, for Liberty to sell these foresaid Lands (lying in several small 
separate Parcels) yt with y e produce of them, they may buy some 
where a 8 more compact Farm, which might bear the name of M r 
Rogers's Gift. N°4. 9 p. 165. 10 

1 The words from "bounded 1735." to "Samuel Jones" are in the margin, a 
caret after "Trescot) " indicating where they should be inserted in the text. 

2 The reference is to page [341] of College Book IV. 

3 Substituted for u y*," crossed out. 

4 The word "from" is interlined. 

5 The reference is to page 72 of College Book V. 

6 The reference is to page [343] of College Book IV. 

7 The figure "114" is underscored. The reference is to page [115] of the 
text, or page 292 of this volume. 

8 The words "where a" are interlined. 

9 A figure, apparently "165," is here crossed out or blotted. 

10 The words "N° 4. p. 165" are in the hand of President Langdon. The ref- 
erence is to page [165] of College Book IV. 



272 COLLEGE BOOK III 

he Honwe On June. 24. 1696. The Hon ble Samuel Sewal Esqr & Hannah his 

ge Sewal's 1 

Acres in Wife, by a written deed or Instrument (now in the Coll. Treasurer's 

raganeet. ' » v 

hand) gave to the college 1 a Farm at Petaquamscot in y e Narraganset 
Countrey, otherwise called Kings Province, containing five hundred 
Acres more or less, bounded southerly by y e Lot laid out to Thomas 
Mumford, which is numbred three; 2 northerly by y e Lot laid out to 
John Wildbore, numbred five ; 3 westerly by a Line runing cross & 4 
dividing this 500. Acres from other Land belonging to said Sewal. 
This whole Lot, before said Sewal gave part of it to y e College, was 
in y e northwest corner of Petaquamscot, & was numbred four. 5 The 
Incomes or Profits of this Farm are by y e donors direction 

' For and towards y e Support and Education at y e said College, of 
'such youths whose Parents may not be of sufficient ability to main- 
' tain them there ; especially such as shall be sent from Petaquamscot 
'aforesaid, English or Indians if any such there be. 

This deed of Gift to y e College, is recorded in y e Book of Land e 
Evidences at Kingstown. May 29. 1706. in n° 2. p. 104. 105. P r Sam 1 
Fones cl. And in y e Book of Land Evidences of the Colony of Rhode- 
island. n° 2. p. 336. P r West, Clark Recorder. A Plat of this Farm 
is w th y e College Treasurer. 

[97] 

I find by sundry Papers in my keeping, which I transcrib'd from 7 
Papers accidentally coming into my hands An. d. 1727. That William 
Phillips bought -ar considerable Quanties of Land on Saco River in y e 
Province of Main Aug. 29. 1660. of Hombinowit, alias John Rogo- 
mock. This deed was witness'd by Robert Field, Ezbon Sanford, 
John Alden. 8 Robert Howard Publick Notary Massachusetts Col- 



i The words "gave to the college" are interlined. 
3 The word " three " is underscored. 

3 The word " five " is underscored. 

4 "&" is interlined. 

5 The word " four " is underscored. 

A letter or two is here crossed out. 

7 There is here a cross in pencil, and in the right margin is a corresponding 
cross in pencil and the following entry written in pencil : "N. B. This land accru- 
ing by this bequest was sold in 1808 to Cap* Jo 9 Haley 3 d Will m Vaughan & 
Colo Tho 3 Cutts." The word " Capt" is interlined. 

s A letter is here crossed out. 



COLLEGE LANDS AT SACO 273 

onie, attested y e copy of y e above mention'd deed, to be true. Sept. 1. 
1667. On y e backside of y e above, 'twas certified y* Livetenant John 
Peik of Newberry, had possession given him by Turf & Twig from y e 
abovesaid Rogomock, for y e piece of W 111 Phillips, in y e Presence of 
Archelaus Woodman and John Gress. 

Said W^ Phillips bought more Land adjoining to Saco River of 
Moheiggon. May. 31. 1664. Ys deed was witness'd by John Wake- 
field & Mary Wakefield. 1 And further, Edward Higgon & John 
Higgon, did, Aug. 17. 1669. confirm y e forementioned Land, in pres- 
ence of Francis Hook & Nicholas Lash. This Instrument was 
entred in y e Records of y e County of York. July. 14. 1669. 

William Phillips of Winter Harbour in y e Province of Main & 
Bridget his Wife, by a firm deed. Aug. 30. 1673. convey'd to M r 
Richard Russel of Charlestown, Merchant, his Heirs & Assigns for- 
ever, two thousand five hundred Acres of Land, bounded in said 
deed as follows viz: 

* Lying and being upon Saco River, Joining to & begining at y e 
'upper part of Salmon Falls in y e Province aforesaid, being in breadth 
' up by Saco River northwest one mile, being on y e westward 2 side of 
1 said River, and to run in length upon y e main Land so far on y e said 
'breadth, as to make up y e said Quantity or number of two thou- 
sand five hundred Acres, and is butting upon Saco River East- 
'wardly, and on y e Land of y e said Phillips Westerly. 

This deed was witness'd by Gershom Hobart & Paul Dudley; 
and acknowledg'd April. 8. 1675. before Edward Rushworth Asso- 
ciate; and entred in y e new Book of Records of y e County of York, 
p. 137. 

M r Richard Russel of Charlestown confirmed to his son Daniel This conve 

ance not to 

Russel (who gave a. 1000. Acres to y e College) two thousand Acres of fouiid - 3 
y e aforesaid Land at Saco, a clause in his conveyance to his son, is as 
follows, viz. 

' I give, grant and confirm unto my son Daniel Ptussel, two thousand 
'Acres of yt my Messuage or Tenement lying and scituate in or near 



1 "John Wakefield & Mary Wakefield " are substituted for "Francis Hook 
Nicholas Lash," crossed out. 

2 Altered from " wester ward." 

3 This marginal entry is in a different hand. 



274 COLLEGE BOOK III 

'y e Town of Saco in the [98] county of York or Province of Main; 
'lying in breadth upon Saco River one mile norwesterly, & begining 
' Just above Salmon Falls ; and up in y e main Land till said Quantity 
1 be compleated ; being bounded by Saco River Easterly, by y e land of 
'William Phillips northerly and Westerly. 

Having shewed how y e Rev nd M r Daniel Russel became owner of 
y e foresaid Lands, I'll now Insert a clause of his Will, ^*4zr Dec. 20. 
1678. viz. 1 

An Abstra An Abstract of y e last Will and Testament of y e Rev nd 
M r Daniel Russel, heretofore of Hartford in y e Colony of Connecti- 
cut ; but deceased at Charlestown in y e County of Middlesex, 
within y e Province of y e Massachusetts Bay in New England, viz. 

'To y e College (wherein I have taken my degrees in Learning, and 
'which has been a means in some measure to fit and furnish me for 
'preaching y e everlasting Gospel, whereof I have sometime been an 
'unworthy Messenger) I give and bequeath one thousand Acres of 
'Land, lying (& being y e one half of my Grant) at Winter Harbour, to 
' be & remain as the said Colleges Estate forever. 

Taken out of y e Registry of 
Wills for 2 y e County aforesaid 
Lib. 18. p. 336. 
By Francis Foxcroft Register 
Probat. for said Middlesex. 
York Ss. Recorded April. 6. 
1731. & Recorded Lib. 14. Fol. 
97. of y e Records for deeds &c 
in y e County of York. 
Attest Jos. Moody Register. 

Mem. M r Sam 1 Woodbridge of Hartford, who married y e daughter 
of y e Rev d m r Daniel Russel, and in her right claim'd one half of y e 
Land given to M r Daniel Russel by his Father, said in a Letter of 
his to M r . Benja. Emons of Boston. Nov. 8. 1726. 






1 The square bracket is in the original. 

2 A letter or two is here crossed out. 



COLLEGE LANDS AT SOUTHERTON 275 

'This 2000. Acres of Land has a fine Meadow in it of abt. 60. 
'Acres; yt y e Tract was laid out by one M r Blackman about thirty 
'years past or something better 

I cannot find, whether M r Blackman took a Plat of these Lands; 
or whether his survey was entred in any publick Records. W thin a few 
years now past, Elisha Cook Esq r of Boston, bought y e 1000. Acres 
belonging to M r Woodbridge in right of his Wife. And his. 1000. 
Acres together with y e Colleges, 1 was survey 'd within two or. 3. 
years past, and y e College did bear part of y e charge. 

[99] 

March. 23. 1657/8. Laid out to Harvard College at Cambridge, c j^ e \*s uth 
in lieu of a Grant made them of two thousand Acres of Land at a erfcon * 
General Court held at Boston, these several parcels of Land in manner 
following, viz. 

On y e East side of Pauquatucket River, one Parcel of Land by 
Estimation about five hundred Acres of Land more or less, being 
bounded with Paucatuck River runing by William Cheesbroughs 
House on y e East & northeast thereof, and continuing upon y e said 
River unto y e Head thereof, and with a Path leading from Mystick 
unto Kechomaug or y e wading place over Pauquatucket River on 
y e south east thereof, y e which Path is y e head of William Chees- 
broughs Land, and on y e West with y e Wilderness. 

Also one other Parcel by Estimation about five hundred Acres more 
or less, lying upon Mystick River, begining about fourty Pole on y e 
south side y e Brook yt runneth into y e said River near to Goodman 
Culver's House, and extending from 2 y e said River half a mile on 
each side thereof, and runing up y e said River fourty Poles above y e 
northside of y e swamp lying at y e north end of y e Plain, and there to 
be in breadth on each side y e River as before named, and y e said Lines 
to be made straight Lines, and not to run crooked as y e River runeth. 

Also one other Parcel by Estimation about five hundred Acres more 
or less, being bounded with 3 a Parcel of Land layd out unto Thomas 
Prentice on y e West, with y e same on y e south, on y e East with Wiqua- 
paug, and on y e north with y e common Land. 

1 A word or letter is here crossed out. 

2 Substituted for "to," crossed out. 

3 Substituted for "by," crossed out. 



276 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Also on y e west of Mystick River five hundred Acres more to be laid 
out upon y e great Plain about two Miles more or less from Goodman 
Culver's House. 

Also one hundred Acres of Meadow of y e nearest yt may be found 
unto y e abovesaid Farms on Mystic River, y e which two last are to be 
laid out by Captain George Denison & Thomas Danforth. 

To y e Hon d General Court assembled at Boston y e 19. of May. 
1658. 

May it please this Hon d Court, to confirm these within mentioned 
Parcels of Land to y e College, as also to grant unto Thomas Dan- 
forth (who hath spent much time in seeking out y e same for y e ac- 
commodation of y e College, and must spend more in seeking y e fur- 
ther Improvement [ 100 ] thereof) three hundred Acres to be laid out 
adjoining to y e West side of yt five hundred Acres, which lieth at y e 
head -yt- of Goodman Cheesbroughs Land, and to be bounded by 
Captain George Denison ; your Petitioner & servant shall be Incour- 
aged to be further serviceable to his power. 

Thomas Danforth. 

The Deputies think meet to grant this Petition with this Proviso, 
yt y e Lands herein specified appertaining to y e College, exceed not two 
thousand five hundred Acres, with reference to y e Consent of our Hon d 
Magistrates hereto. 

William Torrey Clerk 

26 th May. 1658. consented to by y e Magistrates. 

Edward Rawson Secretary 

After each word herein written is recorded, then follows, 

In Answer to y e Petition of M r Thomas Danforth, who laid out y e 
lands above mentioned, which y e Court allows & confirms, and Judg- 
eth it meet to grant unto y e said M r Thomas Danforth, three hundred 
Acres of Land to be laid out to him adjoining to y e West side of the 
College Lands yt lyeth at y e Head of William Cheesbroughs Land, and 
to be bounded by Captain George Denison. 

What 's above written, shows y e Right y e College has to y e Lands 
mention'd, which lye in y e Pequot Country. Corporation votes about 
these Lands may be seen Coll. Book. n° 1. p. 41. on Sept. 27. 1670. & 



COLLEGE LANDS AT CASCO BAY 277 

p. 52. * Dec. 11. 1674. about measuring out y e Bounds of y e foresaid 
Lands. The General Court at Connecticut May. 14. 1674. made some 
conditional Imperfect confirmation of at least some of y e College Lands 
abovesaid, but I think it never took effect. Thorn Danforth Esqr of 
Cambridge (sometime Treasurer of the 2 College, and who laid out 
y e above Lands for y e College) in a Letter to W m Stoughton Esqr. 
July. 3. 1683. Bitterly complains of hard usage from Connecticut, in 
taking from y e Massachusetts Bay y e Lands belonging to ym by Con- 
quest in y e Pequot Countrey ; and in said Letter says 

'As for y e College Lands, y* 5 Grant by y e General Court and return 
'made by myself of y e laying it out, is on Record with M r Rawson; 
'of which y e College was actually possess'd, untill some of Hartford 
'Colony & some of Rhode Island by violence dispossed, and have 
'built thereon. 

Sept. 6. 1717. The Corporation of y e College, voted, to address our 
General Court for an Equivalent for said Lands in Pacatock (see Coll. 
Book. n°4. p. 60 3 ) but y e matter drop'd & no Address was made. The 
College have not for many years (if formerly) had any benefit from 
said Lands, nor essayed to sell or lease them; I suppose they have 
been long since possess'd by others, in their own right as they think. 

[101] 

At a special General Court called by y e Honourable Governour and Merricaneag i 

• • Province o 

Magistrates order, to sit in Boston on y e . 7. Feb. next, and then sat, Main. 

1682/3 

'This Court do grant Merricaneag Neck of Land in the Province 
'of Main in Casco Bay, with one thousand Acres of Land adjacent, 
'unto y e President and Fellows of Harvard College in Cambridge, to be 
' and remain to y e use of y e said College forever ; and y e President of y e 
' said Province is ordered to bound out y e said Grant, as may be most 
'behoofull to y e College 



1 The references are to pages [67, 78] of College Book I, or pages 51, 60, of 
this volume. 

2 The word "the " is interlined. 

3 The reference is to page [60] of College Book IV. 



278 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Here follows another Copy from y e General Courts Records. 

Extracts from y e Instructions of y e General Court of y e Massachu- 
setts Bay, to Joseph Dudley & John Richards Esqrs their Agents in 
England, pass'd in March 1682/3 

' You are also to take notice, in case you see cause to deliver up the 
Meeds for y e Province of Main, yt several Tracts of Land have been 
'granted to several persons, viz. one to y e College of a Neck of Land, 
' called Merricaneag Neck and a thousand Acres lying in Casco Bay ; 
' also a Grant of a thousand Acres to M r Wharton, also a Grant to M r 
' Russel Treasurer, and several Townships setled by y e President of yt 
'Province, which were confirmed while you were here by this Court, 
'all which Titles to y e soil should be excepted, when you make a sur- 
' render of y t Province. 

N. B. As y e first Grant gave y* 5 College a l title & right to these 
Lands ; so y e last mention'd Act of y e Court, shews yt said Court had 
confirm 'd 2 it. 

An. 1684. The General Court granted to Capt. Joshua Scottow 500. 
Acres to be laid out in y e Province of Main in any free place; 3 ys 
Grant was confirm'd by y e Court May. 27. 1685. Twas laid out on 
Merricaneag by Edward Tyng & Sylvanus Davis, who I suppose took 
Merricaneag for a free place 4 (wch it was not, being granted before to 
y e College) M r Scottow sold this 500. Acres to Sam 1 Sewal Esqr 
March. 29. 1690. y e deed was recorded in Suffold Records of deeds 
April. 10. 1690. and in y e Records of deeds in y e Province of Main. Dec. 
3. 1691. Note further. Nov. 8. 1693. the General Court granted [ 102 ] 
to y e foresaid Sam 1 Sewal Esqr & his Wife, 1000. Acres on Merri- 
caneag. I suppose twas y e general Courts forgetting their former Grant 
to y e College 5 yt occasion'd this 6 for wn sd Hon ble Judge Sewal came 
to understand yt Merricaneag had formerly been granted to y e Col- 
lege, and thereupon appli'd himself to y e General Court, s d Court 



1 The word "a" is interlined. 

2 The word "confirm'd" is underscored. 

8 The words "any free place" are underscored. 
4 The words "free place" are underscored. 
6 Here is a caret. 

6 The words "yt occasion'd this" are written in the left margin, preceded by 
a caret. 



COLLEGE LANDS AT RUTLAND 279 

granted him 500. Acres at Pennicook, and were ready to grant him as 
much more in some other place, in lieu of wt they had granted him on 
Merricaneg. Hereupon y e Hon ble Judge Sewal & his Wife, in 
written Instruments (now in Coll. Treasurer's hands) released & re- 
signed to y e College (on April. 24. 1 1696) their. 500. Acres on Merrica- 
neag bought of M r Scottow, and their. 1000. Acres there, granted by 
y e General Court to ym. 

Plan 2 of a piece of Salt-Marsh lying in Dorchester belonging to 
Harvard- College, giv'n by the Hon ble Govern r Stoughton vid. Coll. 
Book N° 4. pag. backside 13. 3 Measured June 15. 1748. f Sam 1 
Blake, laid down by a Scale of two of Gunter's Chains to an Jnch. 

Chainmen, M r John Robinson & M r Sam 1 How. 

Enter'd here Jan. 10. 1754. f E. Holyoke. 



[Here follows, in the hand of President Holyoke, Plan A, between pages 
190-191 of this volume. — Editor.] 



At a Meeting of y e Proprietors of y e Town of Rutland at Boston. Rutland. 
Nov. 5. 1718. duely warned. 

Voted, yt y e Lot in y e Plat marked n° N. be granted to y e use & 
benefit of Harvard College in Cambridge forever, being two hun- 
dred fifty Acres in y e western Wing. 

A true Copy from Rutland Proprietors Book of Records, 

Attest, Sam 1 Wright Clerk of said Proprietors. 

See Coll. B. n° 4. p. 154. 4 

This Farm is in y e south East Corner of y e West Wing, butting 
northerly on Jonathan Waldo 5 n°. 1. & westerly on John Smith, and 
Jeffreys. n°. 6. Easterly on y e setlers part; southerly on Leicester. 
'Tis reckon'd there are thirty or fourty Acres of a large Pond in this 
Tract. 



1 The figure "4" in "24" has perhaps been altered. 

2 This description of the plan, and also the plan itself, are in the hand of 
President Holyoke. The following names appear on Plan A : Isaac How, George 
Minot, Nehemiah Stiles, Daniel Tolman, Jonas Tolman. 

3 The reference is to page [341] of College Book IV. 

4 The reference is to page [154] of College Book IV. 

5 The final letter in "Waldo" has been crossed out and "o" substituted for it. 



280 COLLEGE BOOK III 

[103] 



[ 



The College have hitherto done nothing towards the Improving 
this Rutland Farm. 1 
Vide the Plan of the Town of Rutland pag. 119 & 120. 2 
Vid. Plan of the Coll. Farm in Rutland pag. 121. 3 

enburgh. At a General Court held at Boston Nov. 4. 1719. said Court ordered 
two Towns to be laid out on y e Westerly side of Groton west Line, 
and appointed William Tailer, Samuel Thaxter, Francis Fullam 
Esqrs, John Shipley and M r Benjamin Whittemore a Committee to 
lay out said two Towns, and in their directions given to them by y e 
said Court, were y* 5 following words, viz. 

'That there be laid out and reserved for y e first setled Minister a 
'good convenient Lot, also a Lot for the school, and a Ministerial 
'Lot, and a Lot for Harvard College, of two hundred & fifty Acres 
' each, and yt y e setlers be obliged to build a convenient House for y* 5 
'worship of God in each of y e said Towns, within y e term of four 
'years. 

This clause I transcrib'd from a copy of y 6 General Courts Act, 
attested by Josiah Willard Secretary. 

The two Townships were laid out, and one of ym call'd Lunenburgh, 4 
y* 5 other, Townsend. 5 

Accordingly, there was laid out for y e College, in y e Town of Lunen- 
burgh, as follows, viz. 

Laid out by y* 5 Committee appointed, two hundred and fifty Acres 
and fourty four rod of Land in y 6 i iorthwcs northeasterly part of said 
Township, to Harvard College, begining at a Pillar of Stones erected 
for y e most southerly corner, and riming north. 32. degrees East, an 
hundred & fourty two rod, on second division belonging to John Fisk, 
there making an Angle and runing West thirty two degrees north 



1 The square bracket is in the original. 

2 This entry is in the hand of President Holyoke. The reference is to pages 
[120-121] of the text, or Plan D, between pages 220-221 of this volume. 

3 This entry is in the hand of President Holyoke. The reference is to page 
[122] of the text, or Plan E, between pages 230-231 of this volume. 

4 The word " Lunenburgh " is underscored. 
6 The word " Townsend " is underscored. 



*sw 



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it j 



fit 5 * -®v 






tefrTot 



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■>■! *' 







COLLEGE TENEMENTS AT FRAMINGHAM 281 

282. rod, on y e north Town Line, there making an Angle ; and runing 
south. 32. degrees West an hundred & fourty two rod, on common 
Land there making an Angle; and runing East. 32. degrees south two 
hundred & eighty two rod to where it began. 
Survey'd by Nathan * Hey wood, and appro v'd of by 

Josiah Willard 

Edward Hartwell 

Jonathan Willard 

Nathan Hey wood 



Committee. 



A Plat of ys Farm was given in to y e College, sign'd by y e above n ^ infra p 
Committee. Aug. 19. 1730. y e College paid L. 2-2. for laying out said 
Farm & entring it in y e Proprietors Book in Lunenburgh. Accord- 
ing to y e Plat, y e Farm is in an oblong [ 104 ] oblong form, having 
right Angles, and is, long. 282. Rod, broad. 142. Rod. 

[Hitherto, y e College have not let, nor done any thing to Improve, 
this Farm. 3 

The General Courts Grant about Lunenburgh, will Inform, y* y e Townsend 
like Grant of. 250. Acres is made to y e College in ys Township, but 
'tis not yet laid out so as to be entred in any Book of Records at 
Townsend. 4 We now have a Plat of said Land. 1735. 

It is hereby certified, yt at a Regular Meeting of y e Proprietors in 
y* 3 common & undivided land in y e Town of Townshend upon y e 2 nd 
Wenesday of April. 1734. voted by said Proprietors, yt Cap c W m 
Lawrence, Jasher Wyman, & Amos Whitney, be a committee to lay 
out a Lot to Harvard College agreable to y e Act of y e general Court. 
Attest per me, Jasher Wyman, Proprietors Clark. 

[About this Townshend Farm, look forward, p. 112. 113.] 5 

To Harvard College in Cambridge, on condition hereafter named, The Honbie 
I do give, and when they have a President setled, will confirm by deed, Esqrs o5t. or 

1 Altered from " Nathaneal." 

2 The reference is to page [112] of the text, or Plan B, between pages 200- 
201 of this volume. 

3 The square bracket is in the original. 

4 The word " Townsend " is underscored. 

6 The square brackets are in the original. The reference is to pages [113-114] 
of the text, or page 291 of this volume. 



282 COLLEGE BOOK III 

those three Tenements at Framingham now in Lease to Benjamin 
Whitney, Isaac Bowen & John Whitney, as in their Leases is con- 
tained ; to have & hold y e same forever to their only use & behoof. 
The conditions are as followeth, i. e. 

1) That y e annual Rents thereof shall be for y e support of such 
Student as shall from time to time use & Improve one of the studies 
in y e new lodgings erected by M r Stoughton. 

2) That ye nomination of said person shall be by my heirs resident 
in y e Province. 

3) That such Student shall be exempted from paying Study Rent 
and detriment 

4) If such lodgings shall not be from time 1 to time set & kept in 
good repair, or if any Prelatical Injunctions shall be Imposed on said 
Society, yt in such case, this my Gift shall revert to my Heirs. 

I shall advise of a meet form for such an Instrument as soon as 
the College is setled. 

See Coll. B. n° 4. p. 99. & y e other end of yt Book. p. 8. 2 The annual 
Income of these Lands, is six Pound. 

[105] 

jan d at Hop- An Extract take from y e last Will & Testament of y e Hon ble Sam- 
'HonwJ e saS ue l Brown Esq r , late 3 of Salem in y e County of Essex deceased, viz. 

)wn Esqr 

Item I give to Harvard College in Cambridge, sixty pounds to be 
Improved for purchasing an handsom piece of Plate for y e College, 
with my Coat of Arms on it. I also give & bequeath to y e said College, 
what Lands, Houses, Buildings & Fences I have in y e Town of Hop- 
kinton, which I purchased of Eleazer Giles, alias leased of y e College 
Trustees, and contains about two hundred Acres of Land, together 
with my stock belonging to said Farm; y e Incomes & Rents thereof 
allways to be Improved for bringing up some poor scholar or scholars, 
more especially such as my Sons & their Posterity may recommend. 

A true copy of ye original 

Attest 

Daniel Appleton Register. 



1 The last letter in this word has been altered. 

2 The references are to pages [99, 345] of College Book IV. 

3 The words "Esq r , late" are interlined- 



COLLEGE LAND AT ANDOVER 283 

At a General Court of Election held at Boston the 8 th tenth day of 
y« -third: 8 th * month. -1643; 1641. 

M r Nathanael Ward is granted six hundred Acres of Land where w ^ r d , g F ^ thI 
it may not prejudice a Plantation 

Copy examined P r Josiah Willard Secretary Lib. 1. 390. Pa. 

At a General Court of Election held at Boston y e tenth day of y e 
third Month. 1643. 

M r Nathanael Ward is granted his Farm of. 600. Acres as near 
Pan tucket, as may conveniently be, to be laid out by Sergeant Howlet 
of Ipswich, Joseph Jewett 2 of Rowley, and Phillip Chalice of Salisbury. 

Copy examined by Josiah Willard Secretary Lib. 2. 39. Pa. 

[I find in 3 Coll. Book. n° 1. p. 11. as follows, viz.] 4 

Dec. 10. 1646. 

1 wholly & fully resign, grant, sell & make over all yt Farm of. 600. t^ conve y. 
Acres given me by y e General Court, lying near Andover by Merri- ^^"bSJoiSb 
mack, to y e College at Cambridge forever foik e Lit>. i. foi" 

° XT ,1 1 TIT 1 81 - j0hn Ballan - 

By me Nathanael Ward tine Register. 

Acknowledged y e day & year abovesaid, before me John Winthrop 
Governour. 
Recorded y e 22 (2) 1647. By William Aspinal. V. Recorder. 5 

N. B. This conveyance by M r Ward to y e College, was for a debt Ma 18 1664 

of L. 20. due from him to y College (Coll. B. 2. p. 19) B. 3. p. 42 6 &£<&£# 

for his son's expences there (Coll. B. 3. p. 7) 7 and so this Farm is said ^f ur y e e r . t0 & 

to be purchased 8 B. 3. p. 51. 9 wardB B &°to im- 

_ prove, or sell it 

for ye College 
i tt gth » i s interlined. b e n e fi t. [y e t 

2 Apparently altered from "Hewett." 

3 The word " in " is interlined. 

* The square brackets are in the original. The reference is to page [37] of 
College Book I, or page 22 of this volume. 

8 There is here a cross, referring to the marginal entry beginning "This con- 
veyance]." 

c "B. 3. p. 42" is interlined. The reference is to page [42] of the text, or 
page 209 of this volume. 

7 The reference is to page [7] of the text, or page 176 of this volume. 

8 The word " purchased " is underscored. 

9 There is here a dagger, referring to the marginal entry beginning "May. 18. 
1664." The reference is to page [51] of the text, or page 217 of this volume. 

10 The square brackets are in the original. 



284 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Notwithstand all yt preceeds, I dont find yt this Farm was ever 
laid out, nor was y* 5 College ever possess'd of, & thro y e negligence of 
former times never was benefitted by it 

[106] 

At a General Court held at Boston y e 7 nth day of y* 5 eigthmonth. 
1640. 
jbert cook's M r Robert Cook of Charlestown, in Regard of his Father's hundred 

,nt of 800. t # . 

'*• Pound adventured in y^ Joint Stock, is granted eight hundred Acres 

of Land, where he can find it without Prejudice to any Plantation 
granted or to be granted. 

Copy examined P r Josiah Willard Secretary. Lib. 1. P. 349. 

[I find] ! in y e Inventory of v* 5 College Lands An. 1654. [B. 2. p. 18. 
&] 2 B. 3. p. 41. 3 — "M r Robert Cook of Charlestown, his Gift of a 
"Grant of eight hundred Acres, made him by y* General Court." 

I dont find yt ys Grant was seasonably sought after, nor yt it was 
ever laid out, y e College was never possess'd of nor benefited by it; 
should it not be petition'd for ? 

nerai courts At y e Second Session of y e General Court held at Boston the 19. 

it of. 800. « J 

of October. 1652. 

In Answer to y e Petition of y* President & Fellows of Harvard 
College, y e Court doth grant them eight hundred Acres of Land, and 
Liberty to Imploy such as they please to find out such a place or 
places as - th o y - may be most commodious & convenient for them, 
and to return to this Court what they have done therein, to y e end it 
may be laid out & confirmed to them. 

A true copy, examined P r Josiah Willard Secretary. 

I dont find, yt ys was ever pursu'd or laid out. 

[107] 

From Edward Jackson's Will. (Jun. 11. 1681) Lib. 5. p. 116. 

F^wriJack- I do give unto y e College at Cambridge, Broughton's Chronologie 
&c Also I do give to y e said College, a Tract of Land at Billerica 

1 The square brackets are in the original. 

2 The square brackets are in the original. 
8 The reference is to page [41] of the text, or page 208 of this volume. Here 

the words "in this article," in a different hand, have been interlined and then 
crossed out. 



3 400. Acres. 



COLLEGE ANNUITIES IN NEW ENGLAND 285 

being four hundred Acres granted to me by y e Town of Cambridge, 
as by their Town Book doth appear. Also such debts as my Executors 
shall receive at any time from any debtor or debtors of mine in old 
England, my will is, yt such debts shall be given to y e said College. 

Attest, Samuel Danforth, Register. 

Tho this Will is of so ancient a date, I dont find y e least hint 1 of it 
(as I remember) in y e College Books, nor had I any plane notice of 
it till very lately, when I enquir'd, & procur'd y e above attested copy. 

I find among certain Papers by me, as follows viz. 

Thedore Atkinson of Boston, Feltmaker, by an Instrument bearing Mr Atkinson's 
date y e 13. day of October. 1671. gives & grants to y e President & 
Fellows of Harvard College in Cambridge, and to their Successors in 
y e said Society forever, to y e use of y e said College from & Immedi- 
ately after his decease; a piece of Land lying at y e southward of 
Boston, containing by breadth & length about twenty rods of Ground, 
bounded with a Highway westerly, with Land given to y e Church of 
Charlestown northerly, with Land given by him to y e Church of 
Ipswich Easterly, and with a High Way yt leads to M r Eliakim 
Hutchinson's ground, southerly. 

Recorded with y e Records of Deeds for Suffolk Dec. 17. 1695. 
Lib. 17. pag. 178. 

P r Joseph Webb clerk. 

[I dont find, yt y e College ever sought after this Land, or was any 
way benefitted by it. I think I've heard, as tho y e donor was so 
fancifull as to give away more Land than he had, or at least y e same 
piece of Land first to one & then to another.] 2 

[108] 

Annuities in N. England belonging to Harvard College. 
John Newdigate of Boston bv an Instrument dated Jun. 11. 1650. Mr wewdi- 

° ^ gate's Annuity. 

(recorded March 15. 1702. with Records of Deeds for Suffolk. B. 21. 
Pag. 201. P r Addington Davenport Register) grants ■&■ and establishes 
upon Harvard College in Cambridge in N. England, five Pounds per 

1 The word " hint " is interlined. 

2 The square brackets are in the original. Underneath this entry is written 
in pencil "(Pres* Wadsworth.)." 



286 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Annum to be paid out of y e Rents of his Farm at Rumney Marsh. 
See more of this, Coll. Book. n°. 4. latter end. p. 4. 1 Tis but L. 4. pr 
An. yt's usually pd, I suppose, by it's passing from Countrey pay, to 
money. 
John Giover Extracted from y e Will of M r John Glover of Boston, bearing date 
the. 11. April. 1653. viz 

And further, yt my son Habakkuk shall have y e said half of my 
House in Boston next Goodman Hudsons, with y e half of y e yard and 
other Housing & Tanpitts, my son Habakkuk paying within one year 
to my son Thomas Glover ten pounds, and to my son Nathanael 
Glover fourty pounds, and to Harvard College at Cambridge, for 
and toward y* 5 Maintainance of a Fellow there, five pounds a year 
forever. And if my beloved Wife can spare to give y e said five pounds 
a year in her life time, I doubt not but she will give it. 

examined P r Joseph Marrion Register. 

M r Glover's Will is registred) 
in Suffolk. B. 1. p. 93. ( 

It's 2 butL. 4. P r An. yt's usually reciev'd, I suppose y* 5 reason is, 
'twas first p d in goods or Countrey pay, as then call'd, and since yt 
in money. 

See concerning ys Annuitie Coll. B. 1. p. 49. 3 &. B. 2. p. 38. B. 3, 
p. 52. 4 

The College Books speak of Major Robert Sedgwick of Charles- 
town, his giving to y e College a shop in Boston ('tis sometimes call'd, 
two small shops 5 ) standing by y e great ordinary, 6 called y e Ship Tav- 
ern. 7 This Shop was let by President Dunster to Richard Taylor. Jan. 
13. 1646/7. See Coll. B. 1. p. 15. 8 It seems ys shop was afterwards 
made void by William Phillips, -aad owner of y e great Tavern, and y e 
Tavern-House was Ingaged to pay annually to the College 9 twenty 

1 The reference is to [349] of College Book IV. 

2 A letter, probably "L," is here crossed out. 

8 The reference is to page [75] of College Book I, or page 56 of this volume. 
* The reference is to page [52] of the text, or page 217 of this volume. 

6 The words "two small shops" are underscored. 
The words "great ordinary" are underscored. 

7 The words "Ship Tavern " are underscored. 

8 The reference is to page [41] of College Book I, or page 24 of this volume. 
» A letter or word is here crossed out. 






ANNUITY TO THE COLLEGE 287 

shillings. Coll. B. 2. p. 19. See Coll. B. 3. 7. 42. 51. 1 An. 1663. L. 9. 
was due to y e College from F Phillips B. 3. p. 47. 2 y e same B. p. 50. 3 
Feb. 1. 1668. W 111 Phillips is behind for Rent. L. 11. 
I dont find yt any part of ys L. 11. was ever paid, or any Rent since. 

[109] 

The College Books speak of an Annuity of L. 7. from Capt Scarlet's J£& Bc& l le ^ 
Estate. Jan. 1. 1676 4 I dont find yt more than L. 10. of it was ever 
paid. See Coll. Book. 3. 75. 82.5 b. 4. p. 48.* 

The Corporation ordered their Treasurer. Nov. 7. 1681. to sue for 
this Annuity, if he could not otherwise get it. B. 1. p. 57. 7 B. 3. p. 73. 8 
I dont find yt ys was su'd for, nor any of it rec d to this day. 

The Incomes of y e Ferry between Boston & Charlestown were ^charlestown 
early granted by y e General Court to Harvard College. 

Book first of y e Records for y e Massachusetts Bay Page. 288. 9 An. 
Dom. 1640. The Ferry between Boston & Charlestown, is granted to 
y e College. 

The College now receives L. 260. pr An. from those to whom y e 
Ferry is leased. 



By y e last Will & Testament of Elder Penn 1( > (Ruling Elder of y e 
old church in Boston) L. 10. pr An. are to be given to poor Scholars, 
out of y e Rents of his Farm at Pulling Point; but this money is dis- 
pos'd & order'd by y e Elders & Deacons of y e old church in Boston ; 
so yt neither Corporation nor overseers of y e College have any thing 
to do in y e disposition of said L. 10. pr An. 



Elder Penn 



1 The references are to pages [7,42,51] of the text, or pages 176, 209, 217, 
of this volume. 

2 The reference is to page [47] of the text, or page 214 of this volume. 

3 The reference is to page [50] of the text, or page 216 of this volume. 

4 "Jan. 1. 1676" is interlined. 

5 The references are to pages [76,83] of the text, or pages 246, 252, of this 
volume. 

6 The reference is to page [48] of College Book IV. 

7 The reference is to page [83] of College Book I, or page 69 of this volume. 

8 The reference is to page [74] of the text, or page 243 of this volume. 

9 Massachusetts Colony Records, i. 304. 

10 Apparently altered from " Peen." 



288 COLLEGE BOOK III 



[110] 



lopkinton, The Rents of y e Town of Hopkinton (which Lands were partly 
purchased with moneys given by y e Will - March. -tt-±6ut of Edward 
Hopkins Esqr, dated March. 7. 1657. & partly given by y e general 
Court of y e Massachusetts Bay, in an Act of theirs. Nov. 7. 1716) 
are to be annually -gsv given, three Quarters thereof, to six Bachelours 
(or Masters, in want of Bachelours) of Art residing at y e College, and 
performing such Exercises in Theologie as y c Corporation shall 
appoint them; and the other Quarter of said Rents, to y e Grammar 
school master for y e time being of y e Town of Cambridge, who by 
vertue of this pension, is oblig'd to teach seven scholars in said school 
in Grammar Learning, from time to time gratis. 

The management of these Hopkinton Lands, is in y e hands of 
Trustees according to a decree of Chauncery in great Brittain (y e 
decree of wch Court recover'd y e Legacy given by Esq r Hopkins) 
so yt neither Corporation nor overseers of y e College, have any thing 
to do in renting said Lands, or in receiving Rents from y e Tenants. 
But when y e President Informs y e Trustees of Hopkinton, yt y e 
Bachelours, or in want of ym, Masters, of Art (wch are annually 
chosen by y e Corporation, and presented to y e Trustees for their 
Approbation) on Esqr Hopkins foundation, have resided at y e College 
& perform'd y e Exercises, as aforesaid, then y e Trustees order their 
Treasurer to -paid pay to such Bachelours or Masters, their proportion 
of y e foresaid Rents. 

Annuities in Great Brittain belonging to Harvard College 
in New England. 

p Penoyer's A clause of M r William Penoyr's Will, bearing date May. 20. 1670. 

jacy. 

And for and concerning my Messuage in Norfolk let unto Robert 
More at y e yearly Rent of fourty four Pound Per Annum, my Will is, 
yt out of y e Rents and Profits thereof ten pound pr Annum be paid 
forever to y e Corporation for propagating y e Gospel in New England ; 
and yt with y e Residue thereof two Fellows and two Scholars forever 
be educated and brought up in y e College called Cambridge College 
in New England, of which I desire one of them so often as occasion 
shall present, may be of y e line or posterity of y e said Robert Penoyr, 



COLLEGE ANNUITIES IN GREAT BRITAIN 289 

if they be capable of it; and y e other of y e Colony of Nox, 1 or of Now or late 
late called New haven Colony, if conveniently may be. And I declare copy of Mr p s 

^ . . WiU n >ss. papers 

my mind to be, yt eight years or thereabouts, is a convenient time No 25 - 3 
for y e Education of each scholar respectively, and about yt standing 
others to be taken into their places, which nevertheless as to him, I 
leave to y e Master and Governour of y e said College. This to be 
performed after y e death of my Wife Martha Penoyer. See Coll. B. 
n°. 1. p. 29. 4 & Treasurer Brattles B. p. 21. B 

N. B. These Rents are duely rec d by y* 5 College Treasurer, tho y* 
Rents -ef [ 111 ] ^-f late have, on one account or other, been very low 
of late years, to what they were formerly. 

John Dodderidge Esqr of Bremeridge in y e County of Devon (in 
old England) in his last Will and Testament, which was proved at 
London Jun. 20. 1659. before y e Judges for Probate of Wills [Pell. 
380] 6 has these words, viz. 

1 Also I give & bequeath unto y e College in New England, towards 
'y e maintainance of Scholars there, y e yearly sum of ten pounds to 
1 be forever Issuing & going forth out of my said Rectory of Fremington 
' in y e County of Devon. 

I dont find by 7 y e College Books, yt ys Annuity has been paid to y e 
College, since Feb. 1684. See 8 Coll. B. n°. 4. p. 51. 9 & Treasurer Brat- 
tle's Fol. Book. p. 204. 10 

The Corporation of y e College have been for more than ten years 
past writing to England, to M r Lewis Gregory., Cap* Talamy, M r 
Newman about this matter; they have give in 11 sundry Letters of 

1 The word " Nox " is underscored. 

2 This marginal entry, in the hand of President Langdon, is underscored, and 
refers to the word " Nox " in the text. 

3 This marginal entry is in the hand of President Langdon. 

4 The reference is to page [55] of College Book I, or pages 38-39 of this 
volume. 

5 The reference is to page 21 of College Book V. 

6 The square brackets are in the original. 

7 The word "by" is interlined. 

8 A letter is here crossed out. 

9 The reference is to page [51] of College Book TV. 
10 The reference is apparently to College Book V. That Book contains only 

134 numbered pages; but as there is an allusion to the Dodderidge bequest on 
page 24, it is possible that President Wadsworth inadvertently wrote " p. 204 " 
instead of "p. 24." 
n The words "give in" are interlined. 



290 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Attorney to sue for it in y* Court of chancery; M r Newman now has 
such a Letter, however, y* matter has not hitherto been brought 
actually to a Tryal in chauncery, but I hope it quickly will. 

Ksqr. Boyle O ut °f y* Estate of f* Hon ble Esqr Boyle of great Brittain, fourty 
five pound sterling annually is to be paid to y 6 President & Fellows 
of Harvard College i in Cambridge in N. England, ' to be by them 
1 Imployed & bestowed for y e Salary of two other Ministers, to teach 
*y e Natives in or near his Majesties Colonies there, in y* Christian 
* Religion. 

See Coll. B. 4. p. 33. 34. 38. 39. 42. 2 

This money is paid annually to y e Coll. Treasurer w th y* usual 
Exchange for L. 45. sterl. by y e Commissioners in Boston 3 for propa- 
gating the Gospel among y* 5 Indians. The Corporation of y* College 
Indeavour to dispose these moneys according to y e foresaid directions ; 
tho sometimes they have (for want of Ministers actually teaching f* 
Indians, to recieve it) dispos'd it 4 towards y e educating persons at y e 
College, to prepare them for preaching to y e Indians. 

[1X2] 

Inquire after y e Will of M r Robert Thorner 5 (in old England) dated. 
May. 31. 1690. & y e Will of Dr Daniel Williams 8 (of great Brittain) 
See Coll. Book N°. 4. at y e later end, for M r Thorner's 7 Will. p. 3. 8 
for D r Williams's 9 Will. p. 7. 10 

A Plat of y e College Farm at Lunenbourg. Look back. p. 102. 11 

[Here follows, in the hand of President Wadsworth, Plan B, between pages 
200-201 of this volume. — Editor.] 



1 Apparently altered from "Colledge." 

2 The references are to pages [33, 34, 38, 39, 42] of College Book IV. 

3 The words "in Boston" are interlined. 

4 The word "it" is interlined. 

5 The name "Robert Thorner" is underscored. 
8 The name "Daniel Williams" is underscored. 

7 The word "Thorner's" is underscored. 

8 The reference is to page [350] of College Book IV. 

9 The word " Williams's " is underscored. 

io The reference is to page [346] of College Book IV. 

u The reference is to page [103] of the text, or pages 280-281 of this volume. 
There are no names on Plan B. 



J^fc" 0ftfri/Jur& 




Qrauf/f fa ^ J&& 



,'j2. 




wdf u? mi i/rtcA). 



COLLEGE FARM AT TOWNSHEND 291 

[113] 

College Farm at Townshend. Look back. p. 102. 103. 1 

[Here follows, in the hand of President Wadsworth, Plan C, between pages 
210-211 of this volume. — Editor.] 

The above Plat contains two hundred & fifty Acres of land, laid out 
for Harvard College within y e Bounds of y e Township of Townshend, 
in full satisfaction reserved in y e original Grant of said Township. 
The most Easterly corner being a Stake & Heap of stones in y* 5 Town 
line, at or near Cambridge School-Farm; from which y e line runs 
south, thirty one degrees & an half West, by Common Land one hundred 
and sixty Poles, to a black oak tree; there turning a right Angle & 
runing West 31 \ degrees north on Common Land two hundred & 
fifty Poles, to a black oak Tree marked for a Corner; there making 
a right Angle & runing north 31^ degrees East, on Common Land 
one hundred & sixty Poles, to a stake & stones in y e Town line, 
thence turning & runing East 31 \ degrees south, in y e line of y e Town- 
ship two hundred & fifty Poles to y e Corner first mentioned, all of 
which Corners are well marked and a sufficient number of Boundaries 
made in y e several lines 

Examined & approved by Laid out December. 1735. 

us y e Subscribers By order of y e Committee 



William Lawrence 
Jasher Wyman 
Amos Whitney 



for y e Proprietors of Town- 
Committee, shend. 

John Stephens Surveyor. 



Entred in y e Records of y e Proprietors of Townshend (tho not y e 
Plat) p. 318. 

[114] 

Mem. March. 10. 1735/6. The Steward had a Note to pay to 
Capt. W m Lawrence L. 8-7 s -0 d . for charges about y e College Farm at 
Townshend; besides, L. 13-5-9. formerly p d to Capt. Bordman & M r 
Jones, on y e same account in general. 

Mem. one hundred Acres were laid out for y e College by M r Jones 
& Capt. Bordman; and afterwards. 75. Acres at each end of it (250. 
in all) by Capt. Lawrence, M r Wyman, M r Whitney. 2 

1 The references are to pages [103-104] of the text, or pages 280-281 of this 
volume. The name "m r Jones" appears on Plan C. 

2 President Wadsworth's hand ends here. 



292 COLLEGE BOOK III 

[115] 

Articles l of Agreement for division and Partition indented made 
and concluded on the twentieth day of November in the ninth Year 
of his Majesties Reign Annoq Domini 1735 between Edward Hutchin- 
son of Boston in the County of Suffolk in the province of the Massa- 
chusetts Bay in New England Esq r Henry Flynt of Cambridge in the 
County of Middlesex in the province aforesaid Esq r Nathaniel Apple- 
ton of Cambridge afores d Clerk and Andrew Boardman Steward of 
Harvard College in Cambridge aforesaid Esq r or any three of them a 
Committee appointed and impowered by the President and Fellows 
of Harvard College in Cambridge afores d the eighteenth of August 
1735 as by the Records of the College may appear to make 2 such ami- 
cable Agreements and Settlements for and in behalf of said College 
with the Church and Town of Rowley in the County of Essex referring 
to the Division and Settlement of sundry parcles of Land given and 
bequeathed to said Harvard College and Church and Town of Rowley 
by the Rev d M r Ezekiel Rogers late of Rowley aforesaid Clerk de- 
ceased on the one Part and Deacon Humphrey Hobson Thomas 
Lambert Esq r Ephraim Nelson Gentleman Joseph Jewet 3 Jun r 
yoeman 4 and John Northend Gentleman a Committee appointed by 
said Church of Rowley and Ephraim Nelson Nathaniel Mighil 
Jeremiah Chaplin Gentleman Samuel Dickinson yoeman 5 and 
Thomas Lambert Esq r a Committee appointed by said Town of 
Rowley to joyn with the Committee aforesaid in the Division and 
final Settlement of said Parcles of Land bequeathed as aforesaid on 
the other part as 6 followeth. To wit whereas the said President and 
Fellows of said Harvard College and the said C hh and Town of 
Rowley by vertue of the last Will 7 and Testament of the said late 
Rev d M r Ezekiel Rogers of Rowley deceased are seized and possessed 
of sundry Parcles of upland Meadow and Wood Land in their own 
right as of fee in Rowley afores d and that the said President and 



This agreement is written in an unknown hand. 

The words " to make" are interlined. 

The letter " w " in this word has been altered. 

The letters " oe " in this word have been altered. 

The letters " oe " in this word have been altered. 

Written over "that," erased. 

Altered from "will." 



COLLEGE LANDS AT ROWLEY 293 

Fellows and the said C^ 1 and Town might know have and enjoy their 
respective rights in 4s- said several Parcles of Land given and be- 
queathed as aforesaid in severalty. Wherefore we y e said Edward 
Hutchinson Henry Flynt Nathaniel Appleton and Andrew Board- 
man in the capacity aforesaid for and in behalf of said President and 
Fellows of said Harvard College and their Success r s and we the said 
Humphrey Hobson Tho s Lambert Ephraim Nelson Joseph Jewet i 
Jun r and John Northend Ephraim Nelson Nathaniel Mighil Jere- 
miah Chaplin [ 116 ] Samuel Dickinson and Thomas Lambert in the 
Capacity aforesaid for and in behalf of the said Church and Town 
of Rowley aforesaid and their Success r s have mutually covenanted 
and agreed and by these presents do mutually covenant and agree in 
and to the division partition and final Settlement of said Lands as 
follows Videlicet Imprimis That the said President and Fellows of 
Harvard College and their Success r s shall and may from henceforth 
and forever hereafter Have Hold use occupy possess and enjoy as 
their part and share of said Lands the several peices and parcles of 
said Land for the use of said College 2 as follows To wit A Certain 
peice or parcle of salt Marsh and upland at a place called Sandy- 
bridge containing by Estimation fifteen Acres be it more or less 
bounded westerly on Land belonging to the Church and Town form- 
erly given them by said 3 Rev d M r Ezekiel Rogers deceased Southerly 
and Eastwdly on a Creek and partly on Jeremiah Hobson till it 
comes to the Road then crossing said Road Eastwardly on Capt n 
Pickard to the notherly Corner and notherly on a high way also a 
high way running 4 cross 5 said Land also another peice of Salt Marsh 
called 6 Cowbridg Marsh about nine or ten Acres be it more or less 
bounded westerly on the Church and Town Land given them by M r 
Ezekiel Rogers afores d southerly partly on James Platts and partly 
on Richard Doel Eastwardly 7 on Pickards Land and Notherly partly 
on said Chh and Town Land and partly on Josiah Bishop. Also 
about three quarters of an Acre of salt Marsh be it more or less called 

1 The letter " w " in this word has been altered. 

2 The word " College" is interlined. 

3 Substituted for "the," crossed out. 

4 Written over a word erased. 

5 This word has been altered. 

6 The word "called" is interlined. 

7 The letter "w"in this word has been altered. 



294 COLLEGE BOOK III 

high way Marsh bounded westwardly and southerly by Deacon Boyn- 
ton 1 Eastwardly, with with Jonathan Todd and Notherly with 
widdow Pickard Also a peice of fresh Meadow called Satchels Meadow 
about six Acres be it more or less bounded westwardly on the Chh and 
Town Land given them by -feke- said M r Rogers southerly and East- 
wardly by a brook and Notherly and northwestwardly on John North- 
end which peice of salt and fresh Meadow and upland are supposed 
to yield one year with another about 2 thirty 3 Loads of Hay Also all 
that lot or tract of Land laid out to M r Ezekiel Rogers's Living at a 
place called Hounsley Hill containing about thirty Acres be it more 
or less bounded as on record in Rowley records also the lower Homelot 4 
or Homestead containing about six Acres more or less bounded noth- 
erly Eastwardly and Southerly on high ways and Westwardly on 
Thomas Lambert Jun r and Deacon Hobson Also the upper House 
Lot on the other side of the high Way containing about eight Acres 
more or less bounded southerly on the High Way Eastwardly on the 
late Rev d M r Pay tons Homestead and the [ 117 ] High way or Common 
Land notherly on Benjamin Smith and the Horse pasture and west- 
wardly on Deacon Hobson Also the Horse pasture adjoyning to said 
upper house Lot containing about eleven Acres more or less bounded 
Eastwardly on Benjamin Smith Notherly on the Rev* 1 M r Jewet and 
John Steward Westwdly on Joseph Broklebeuck southerly on Cap* 
Mighil and Jeremiah and Humphrey Hobson and said upper House 
Lot Also a peice of arable Land about six Acres more or less lying 
near M r Ezekiel Northends bounded notherly on the high Way 
Eastwardly on s d Ezekiel Northend southerly on David Hammand 
Westwdly on Land in possession of John Todd Also a parcel of 
upland and Marsh being yt 5 part 6 of warehouse pasture which be- 
longed to said 7 M r Rogers about fifteen Acres more or less bounded 
westerly on M r Broadstreet and the Creek eastwardly on the River 
called warehouse River & the shipyard and notherly on Thomas 
Lambert Esq 1 " a High way to the shipyard running through part of it 

1 Apparently altered from " Baynton." 

2 The word "about" is here interlined. 

3 The word "about " was here interlined and then erased. 
« Altered from "Houselot." 

5 "yt" is interlined. 

« Here "yt" was interlined and then crossed out. 

7 The word "said" is interlined. 



COLLEGE LANDS AT ROWLEY 295 

Also eight Wood Lots in the three thousand Acres so called marked 
and numbred as follows To wit with the Letter A N° 10 D. N° 10 
D N° 25 E N° 3. B N° 4 S N° 7 S N° 4 S N° 14 The said several 
Lots being butted * and bounded as in the Commoners Book of 
Records in Rowley Also eight Wood Lots in the middle Commons 
so called Markt and Number'd as follows To wit with the Letter K 
N° 10 LN°5 SN°9 P N° 2 Q.N°1. R.N°11. G.N°1. TN°2 
The said several Lots being butted 2 and bounded as in the Com- 
moners Book of Records in Rowley or however these and all or any 
the aforemention'd peices or parcles of Land are otherwise bounded 
or reputed to be be bounded Also four freehold rights or Commonages 
in Mill Swamp pasture in the lower Commons lying in general with 
the rest of the Propriety in said pasture And the said Humphry Hob- 
son Thomas Lambert Ephraim Nelson Joseph Jewet Jun r and John 
Northend a Committee of the Church and the said Ephraim Nelson 
Nathaniel Mighil Jeremiah Chaplin Samuel Dickinson and Thomas 
Lambert the Committee of the s d Town of Rowley for and in behalf 
of said Church and Town do hereby remit release 3 and forever quit- 
claim unto the said President and Fellows of Harvard College and 
their Success r s in said Trust for the use of said College for ever all 
their right title Interest claim and demand whatsoever of in and unto 
all and every the forementioned parts and parcles of Land herein 
assigned and set of to said President and Fellows of said College and 
their Success r s for the use of said College for ever as aforesaid. All 
which said several peices and parcles of Land remissed and released 
as aforesaid together with the [ 118 ] Summ of one hundred pounds 
in province Bills of Credit paid for the use of said Harvard College 
is in full Satisfaction for the whole 4 right Interest and demand of 
the said President and Fellows of said Harvard College for the use 
of -the s d Harvard College in and unto all and every part of the real 
Estate of the late Rev 4 M r Ezekiel Rogers aforesaid deceased by 
Virtue of his last Will and Testament. 

Secondly that the said Church and Town of Rowley shall & may 
from henceforth and forever Have Hold use possess and enjoy for 
the use of said Church and Town as mentioned in said Will the fol- 



1 The letters " tt " in this word have been altered. 

2 This word has been altered. 

3 Altered from ' ' relate. ' ' 

4 Altered from " whose." 



296 COLLEGE BOOK III 

lowing parcels of Land To wit the salt Marsh upland and Meadow 
given by the late Rev d M r Ezekiel Rogers aforesaid being at Sandy 
bridg Cowbridg and Satchels Meadow that is to say the whole of said 
peices 1 of Land excepting what in this aforewritten Jnstrument is 
relased 2 to said College Also the whole of the Land that said Church 
and Town hold and enjoy by virtue of said M r Rogers's Will in the 
East and West End Ox 3 pastures in the additional Grant to East 
End Ox pasture called the new Ox pasture at Hawk Meadow at 
great Swamp and two Freeholds in the several late Divisions of Land 
in said Town that is to say the several Divisions or Lots of Land 
that have or may arise by vertue 4 of said Freeholds and all other 
peices of land in said Town wheresoever and whatsoever which said 
College hereafter demand by vertue of said M r Rogers's Will and the 
said Edward Hutchinson Henry Flynt Nathaniel Appleton and 
Andrew Boardman the Committee aforesaid for and in behalf of the 
said President and Fellows of said - Harv^ 1 College do hereby remise 
release and forever quitclaim unto the s d Church & Town of Rowley 
for the use of said church and town of Rowley 5 forever according to 
the Will of said M r Rogers all their right title interest and Demand 
whatsoever of in and unto all and every the aforementioned parts 
and parcles of Land herein assigned and set of to the said Chh and 
Town forever as afores d And in Testimony hereof and that the 
aforementioned division partition and setlement may remain firm 
and stable and be held good and valid by the said Parties and their 
Success r s respectively for ever according to the true intent and mean- 
ing of these presents the respective Committee for Harvard 6 College 
for the Chh and for the Town of Rowley have to these presents inter- 
changeably set their hands and Seals the day and year first aforewritten 
Signed sealed and delivered 



in the presence of us f The Names and ac- 

Benjamin Smith -J knowlegment on th 

Edward Sanders. [ following Page. 



1 Substituted for "parcels," crossed out. 

2 Altered from "related." 

3 The first letter in this word has been altered. 

4 The words "that have or may arise by vertue" are written over some words 
erased. 

6 The words "of Rowley for the use of said church and town of Rowley" are 
interlined. 

8 The letter "H" in this word is written over "Th." 



COLLEGE FARM AT WALTHAM 297 

[119] 

Essex, Sc: Rowley Nov r 20 th 1735 Thomas Lambert o 

Then Thomas Lambert Esq r Ephraim Nelson o 

Ephraim Nelson Humphry Hobson Humphry Hobson O 

Joseph Jewet John Northend Jeremiah Joseph Jewet O 

Chaplin Nathaniel Mighill Samuel John Northend O 

Dickinson all personally appered and Jeremiah Chaplin O 

acknowleged the above foregoing written Nathaniel Mighill O 

Instrument to be their free act and Deed Samuel Dickinson O 

Before Daniel Appleton J s P a 

Essex ss Rec d on Record Aug. 26. 1736. Recorded Libro. 72. 
Folio. 6. & examined, Attest John Higginson Register. 1 

N. B. The Moneys w ch the Lands in Rowley were sold for as by the 
foregoing Deed were laid out in the Purchase of a Farm. at. Waltham 
of one M r Caverly containing 164. Acres Vid. the Survey'd Plan as 
Enterd. pag. 123, 124. 2 The Deed of w ch Land is Recorded in the 
Records of the County of Middlesex. Lib. pa. 3 

[120-121] 

[These two pages 4 are filled with a plan of Rutland, in the hand of President 
Holyoke. See Plan D, reproduced in this volume between pages 220-221. — 
Editor.] 



1 These two lines are in the hand of President Wadsworth. 

2 The reference is to pages [124, 125] of the text, or pages 300, 301, of this 
volume. 

3 This entry is in the hand of President Holyoke. 

4 As stated in the editorial note, Plan D fills pages [120-121] of the text. On 
page [120] appear the names of Brookfield, Leicester, and Sumpoag Pond. There 
are forty-nine lots, of which thirty-three are numbered from 1 to 33; ten are 
lettered O-U, W, X, Y; three are neither numbered nor lettered, but are marked 
"Meadow;" two are neither numbered nor lettered nor marked; and one (in 
the lower right-hand corner) is lettered N and marked "College." The owner- 
ship of the thirty-three numbered lots is given as follows, Holyoke's spelling 
being preserved: 1, Forster now J. Waldo; 2, Wright Wilder & Stevens; 3, A 
Davenport now Charnock & Franklyn; 4, Jon a Willards Heirs; 5, Col Browne 
& Dyer; 6, Jn° Smith & Jeffries; 7, Moses Parker now Oulton & Waldo; 8, 
Josiah Willard's Heirs; 9, Col° Chandler; 10, Tho s Hutchinson; 11, Col° Fitch; 
12, Salter & Bill; 13, Col° How & M r Waldo; 14, Col° Townsend now Col° 
Minot; 15, Henry Willard's Heirs; 16, Rev d M r Parsons; 17, Col° How; 18, 
Col Tayler; 19, Sam 1 Wright; 20, Edmonds's Heirs now Cap* Smith; 21, Dan 1 
Willard's Heirs; 22, Rob* Blood's Heirs; 23, Forster now Oulton & Waldo; 24, 
Paul Dudley Esqs; 25, Hay ward & Benj a Parker; 26, Rev d M r Sam 1 Willards; 
27, Cap* Jacob Stevens; 28, Jos. Willards; 29, Coll° Winthrop; 30, Col Winslow 



298 



COLLEGE BOOK III 



[122 1 ] 

A true Plan of the College Farm in the West Wing of the Town of 
Rutland, it being the South easterly Corner Farm of that Wing 
mark'd N. pag. 119, 2 Survey 'd by Thomas Harman Surveyor, John 
& Robert Samond being Chain men, who were all sworn to the Truth 
of this Survey before Jos. Convers. Just. Pac. 

This Farm viz both Pond & 3 Upland contains 274. Acres & 94 
Rods plann'd in this Page by a Scale of fifty Rods to an Inch; but 
the Original Plan taken by the aboves d Harman by a Scale of 25. 
Rods to an Inch. June 11. 1751 : vid. Supra. 4 pag. 102. 5 

The Field Notes round the Pond are 6 as Followeth. 

Beginning at the S. West Corner, where the Town Line 7 crosseth 
the Pond viz at 1. Thence running 







Rods. 






Rods 




f 2 N. 12 


W. 20.*] 




f 14. 


S. 38°. 


W. 8.^ 




3 N. 8- 


E. 18. 




15. 


S. 20. 


W. 10. 




4 N. 3. 


E. 18. 




16. 


S. 36. 


E. 20. 




5 N. 


26 




17. 


S. 28. 


W. 3. 




6 N. 10. 


W. 14. 




18. 


S. 21. 


E. 36. 


To- 


7 N. 15. 


E. 36 


- To« 


19. 


S. 5. 


E. 18. 


8 N. 2. 


W. 26 


20 


S. 22. 


W. 14. 




9 N. 8. 


E. 24 




21. 


S. 9. 


W. 44. 




10 N. 16. 


E. 37 




22 


W. 27. 


S. 18 




11 E. 15. 


S. 59 




23 


S. 11. 


E. 6. 




12 S. 9. 


W. 38 




1. 


W. 5° 30' 


N. 61. 




U3 S. 1. 


E. 10 4 




L 




) 



a 

o 

CO 

o 

o 

o 

o 

*-- 
e 

o 



Where it began. 8 

(written over a number and a name erased); 31, John Willards Heirs; 32, Cap* 
Brintnall; 33, Coll° Bulkley's Heirs. 

On page [121] appear the following: Leicester, Meeting-house, ministers Lot, 
Province Farm, Saw Mill Farm, Judge Sewal's Farm, Worcester. There are also 
the following words: "Mem The original Plan upon the same Scale, is upon 
File;" "Setled Part of Township of Rutland Six Miles Contents;" "Enter'd 
here Jan. 12. 1754. by E. Holyoke." 

1 The entries on page [122] of the text are in the hand of President Holyoke. 

2 The reference is to page [120] of the text. See Plan D, between pages 220- 
221 of this volume. 

8 "&" is interlined. 

* Written over "infra," erased. 

* The reference is to page [103] of the text, or pages 280-281 of this 
volume. 

c The word "are" is interlined. 
7 The word " Line " is interlined. 

e After the figure "1," the words "Where it first began" were originally writ- 
ten, then erased and over them written the words in the text. 



COLLEGE LAND AT BILLERICA 299 

Enter'd here by E. Holyoke Jan 16. 

1754. 

Mem° The original Plan by Harman is upon File. 

[Here follows, in the hand of President Holyoke, Plan E, between pages 230- 
231 of this volume. 1 — Editor.] 

[123 2] 

Enter'd here Jan. 14. 1754. P E. Holyoke. 

Vid. infra p. 93. 3 

Mem The original plan upon the same Scale is upon File. 

[Here follows, in the hand of President Holyoke, Plan F, between pages 240- 
241 of this volume. 4 — Editor.] 



A plan or Plat of a Tract of Land 
lying in Billerica at a Place call'd 
Shawshin belonging to Harvard- 
College containing near 230 Acres 
Taken from a Scale of 40 Perch to 
an Inch, The easterly Line was 
Setled as in this Plan, & Each 
of the Boundaries consented to, 
as may fully appear, by a Settle- 
ments under the Hands & Seals 
of the Parties. Sept. 25. 1744. 
V Caleb Brooks. Surv r 



1 Plan E mentions "James Brownings Land," "W m Browning's Land," "Jn° 
Moor's Land," "Swamp," "a Ridge of Upland," and "a little Brook;" and 
contains the following entries: "These Lots in the Old Town are prick' d on to 
this E. Side of the College Farm;" "This Line divides the Coll. Land from Lot. 
6 pa. 119 [page 120 of the text] inscrib'd Jn° Smith & Jeffries now claim'd by 
W m & George Harper;" "Part of Lot. N° 1: pa. 119 [page 120 of the text]. 
Claim'd by Col° S. Waldo;" "Butter-nut Brook so called from Butter nut 
Trees that grow by it. neither are any known besides these, within Three Miles 
of this Place;" "Sumpoag Pond w ch covers 93 Acres & 61 Rods of Ground." 

2 The entries on page [123] of the text are in the hand of President Holyoke. 

3 The reference is to page [94] of the text, or page 269 of this volume. 

4 Plan F mentions "Farm-house," "Shawshin River," Jacob Walker's house, 
Jacob Walker's inclosure; and contains the entry that "This End of the Farm 
to the Road is 109% Acres." 



300 



COLLEGE BOOK III 



[124 1 ] 

This Plan on this & the other Side 2 describes The Farm in Waltham 
called Rogers's Farm w ch belongs to Harvard-College in Cambridge, 
vid. pag. 95. 118. 3 laid out by a 4 Scale of 30 Perches in an Inch; by 
Benj a Johnson, The original Plan as taken by the s d Johnson 5 being 
upon file. 

An Account of the several Divisions in this Farm together their 
several improvements & 6 Contents in Acres &c. here follows. 

r no 



The N° Mark - 



9. 
10. 
11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 
18 
19 



is improv'd in 







Acres 


Roods 


Perches 


Pasture . . . 


19. 


1. 


28 


Land w th out 








Fence . . . 


5. 


3 





Mowing 




6 


0. 


16 


Mowing 




4 


2 


20 


Pasture 




2. 





16 


Orchard 




1. 


0. 





Pasture 




10. 


3. 





Pasture 




14. 








Pasture 




24. 


0. 





Pasture 




18. 


0. 





Pasture 




16. 


3. 





Mowing 




2. 








Orchard 7 near 








y e House . . 


3. 


0. 





House & barn 








& Land . . 


0. 


2. 


10 


A Fruit- 








Garden . . . 


0. 


2. 





A small Orch- 








ard .... 


0. 


1. 


30 


Pasture . . . 


2. 


0. 





Pasture . . . 


3 


2. 





Mowing Tilling 








& Orcha 


rd . 


29 


2. 






1 The entries on page [124] of the text are in the hand of President Holyoke. 

* By "the other Side " is meant page [125] of the text, or Plan G, between 
pages 250-251 of this volume. 

3 The references are to pages [96, 119] of the text, or pages 271, 297, of this 
volume. 

« The word "a" is interlined. 

8 The word "Johnson" is interlined. 

8 The words "several improvements &" are interlined. 

7 Written over a word erased. 



cffl£jt7U&&f 




■- 



jrfmtw^m^r 






m* 










.*, 



vJ si 



^ 



^1 



m e 



^ 



COLLEGE FARM AT WALTHAM 



301 



Here followeth an Account of the Proportion of Fence 1 to be made 
by y e 2 several Borderers upon this Farm together with the College 
Proportion of s d Fencing, as contained w th in the several Braces, 
noted by the Letters of the Alphabet. 



The Brace mark d 





Perches 


John Fisk .... 


62. 


The College . . . 


62. 


George Adams . . 


31. 


The College . . . 


31. 


Jon a Sanderson 


27. 


Deacon Sanderson 


5. 


The College . . . 


5. 


Jon a Sanderson 3 . 


20. 


The College . . . 


47. 


The College . . . 


67. 


Thomas Hammond 


69. 


John Lawrence . 7" 


16. 


The College . . . 


16. 


The College . . . . 


48. 


Samuel Stearns . . . 


44. 


David Mead . . . . 


43. 


The College . . . . 


43. 



A 

b 
c 
d 
e. 1 
f 

g 

e. 2 contains the 

h Proportion of 

J Fence to be 

k made by 

1 

m 
n 
o 
p. 

q 



[125 4] 

This Plan taken by Ben. Johnson Nov. 20. 1750. was enterd here 
Jan 19. 1754 By E. Holyoke And contains 164. Acres. 

[Here follows, in the hand of President Holyoke, Plan G, between pages 250- 
251 of this volume. 5 — Editor.] 

[126 6 ] 

A Plan of the Sink from the Kitchin of the New Building & of the 
Drains from Stoughton & the Massachusetts. 

1 The word "Fence" is interlined. 

2 The word "y 6 " is interlined. 

3 Written over "The College," erased. 

4 The entries on page [125] of the text are in the hand of President Holyoke. 
6 Plan G shows a Pond and nineteen lots; and contains the following entry: 

"***** These Asterisms beginning in N°. 6. shew the high way of 2 Rods Wide 
which the College gave leave to be laid out thro' the Farm for the use of the 
Town of Waltham Anno 1761. vid. Coll. Book N° 7. pag. 92. 95." 

6 The entries on page [126] of the text are in the hand of President Holyoke. 
This page is not numbered in the original. 



302 COLLEGE BOOK III 

Mem° The Asterisk* ! near the Mouth of the sink is 9 feet from 
the Front of the New Building, in which place there is in the Sink an 
opening at present stop'd with 2 a large Slate, on y e West side, in order 
to receive (if there ever shou'd be need of it) a Drain running parallel 
to the New Building. 

[Here follows, in the hand of President Holyoke, Plan H, between pages 260- 
2G1 of this volume. 3 — Editor.] 

[127 4 ] 

[Here follows, in the hand of President Langdon, Plan I, facing page 270 of 
this volume. 5 — Editor.] 

cghi represents the proper bounds of the college land & the opposite 

sides are equal, 
efgba is the land inclosed, 
abed is M r 6 Bordman's land in the President's improvement 

ab = 45J links 

be = 10i 

bg = 145J 

gf = 158 

gh = 174 

hi = 135 

ef = 67 

dc = 58 

cghi is, 23490 sq e 7 links equal to 37$ Rods 

fhide is 5560 Links — Coll : land improved by M r Boardman 

abed is 543 do. 

5017 Ballance due from M r Boardman to 8 the College, 
equal to 8 Rods 



1 Altered from "Aster-ism." 

2 The words " an opening at present stop'd with " are interlined. 

3 Plan H mentions the "New Building on the foundation of that which was 
burnd," Massachusetts, Stoughton, "Fence behind Stoughton," "Ditch in y e 
Presidents Orchard," "Privy." 

4 The entries on page [127] of the text are in several unknown hands. 

5 Plan I mentions "Presidents House Lot," "M r Wiggleswo[r^]," "College 
Land in the President's Improvement," "College Land in M r Boardman's Im-